Faculty & Research Scientists


James A AustinJames A Austin
Stratigraphic evolution of a wide range of marine and lacustrine environments around the world
Jaime D BarnesJaime D Barnes
Stable isotope geochemistry, metamorphism and volatile transport in subduction zones, fluid-rock interaction and metasomatism, geochemical cycling, stable chlorine isotopes
Whitney  BehrWhitney Behr
Mechanics and kinematics of deformation in continental lithosphere, rheology of the crust and upper mantle, mechanisms of strain localization, experimental rock mechanics, tectonic geomorphology and long term slip rates on large-scale strike-slip faults.
William D CarlsonWilliam D Carlson
Field, analytical, and experimental studies of metamorphic petrogenesis, with emphasis on the rates and mechanisms of metamorphic reactions. Geological applications of high-resolution X-ray computed tomography. Analytical and computational studies of intracrystalline and intergranular diffusion.
Elizabeth J CatlosElizabeth J Catlos
The geological evolution of the Turkey (various regions), Himalayas (India and Nepal), south India (Tamil Nadu), and Slovakia (Carpathians); models for heat, mass, and fluid flow along tectonic structures; developing techniques for isotopic microanalysis; applying mineral equilibria to estimate environmental conditions during dynamic recrystallization; accessory mineral geochronology; stone decay and deformation mechanisms. Overall, I am interested in developing and applying petrochemical and geochemical techniques to the study of lithosphere dynamics.
Gail L ChristesonGail L Christeson
Marine seismology, mid-ocean ridge structure and emplacement processes, oceanic crustal structure, ocean-bottom seismology, seismic refraction
Ian W DalzielIan W Dalziel
Tectonics, geodynamics, geography of ancient times, plate reconstructions, structural geology
Ian J DuncanIan J Duncan
Expertise in geomechanic and geochemistry applied to: risks associated with CO2 sequestration; hydraulic fracturing for shale gas production; environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing; and the water-energy nexus. Current research focuses on the scientific, environmental and public policy aspects of unconventional natural gas production, the water-energy nexus, and carbon capture and storage. He has a particular interest in risk analysis, decision making, and legal/regulatory issues related to fracing, CO2 sequestration, CO2-EOR, and energy production.
Peter  EichhublPeter Eichhubl
Fault and fracture mechanics, diagenesis and low-temp. geochemistry, fluid flow and transfer processes in sedimentary basins, deformation mechanisms of the upper crust, structural control of mass and heat transfer in sedimentary basins, effects of chemical mass transfer on the mechanical and hydraulic behavior of fractures and faults, chemical interaction between fluids and minerals
Brent Elliott
Andras  FallAndras Fall
Fluids in diagenetic and hydrothermal systems, Fluid inclusion techniques, Fracture analysis, Structural diagenesis, Unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs, Raman spectroscopy
Peter P FlaigPeter P Flaig
Research Focus: North Slope-Alaska, Central Transantarctic Mountains-Antarctica, Canada, Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway of North America - Clastic sedimentology - Fluvial sedimentology - Paleoenvironmental reconstruction of continental to shallow-marine systems using sedimentology, stratigraphy, architecture, and ichnology in outcrop studies - Photography and high-resolution imagery (e.g. LiDAR, GigaPan) of clastic systems - Paleopedology - Remote logistics.
Peter B FlemingsPeter B Flemings
Stratigraphy, basin analysis, basin-scale fluid flow, pore pressures in seafloor sediments, submarine landslides, oil and gas migration, methane hydrates, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP)
Cliff FrohlichCliff Frohlich
Seismology, deep earthquakes, Texas earthquakes, moonquakes, statistical analysis of earthquake catalogs
Julia F GaleJulia F Gale
Natural fracture / vein systems in sedimentary and metamorphic rocks; structural geology; tectonics
James E GardnerJames E Gardner
Volcanology, volcanic eruption processes, magmatic processes, experimental petrology, volatiles in magmas, degassing of volatiles from magmas, control of degassing behavior on volcanic eruptions and formation of ore bodies
Omar  GhattasOmar Ghattas
Computational geoscience and engineering, simulation and optimization of complex solid, fluid, and biomechanical systems, inverse problems, optimal design, and optimal control
Stephen P GrandStephen P Grand
Seismic imaging of Earth's mantle, tomography, dynamics of flow in the mantle, regional seismic studies
Sean S GulickSean S Gulick
Studies of convergent margins to examine tectonic influences, structural deformation, fluid flow, and earthquake hazards; imaging and geologic sampling of in situ tectonic and crater laboratories: microplates, triple junctions, transitional plate boundaries, and bolide impacts; and quantitative high-resolution marine geological and geophysical studies of tectonic and climate interactions on glaciated orogenic margins.
Bob A HardageBob A Hardage
Seismic stratigraphy interpretation; reservoir characterization; acquiring, processing, and interpreting downhole and surface seismic data; multicomponent seismic technology
Nicholas W HaymanNicholas W Hayman
Currently active projects include studies of ocean-crustal faulting, the dynamics of continental rifting, evolution of forearc basins and accretionary prisms, and mudrock microstructure. Also many projects involve sailing on research vessels to study active spreading centers in various corners of the globe.
Mark A HelperMark A Helper
Dr. Helper is a field geologist, a generalist whose interests span igneous and metamorphic petrology, structural geology, tectonics, mineralogy and planetary field geology. His current research explores geochemical and isotopic similarities of Proterozoic and Archean crust in East Antarctica and the southwestern U.S., the Precambrian geology of Texas, and the origin of epidote blueschists in the Klamath Mountains of northern California. Recent senior honors theses under his supervision have examined the mineralogy of Texas ...
Brian K HortonBrian K Horton
Tectonics of sedimentary basins, evolution of orogenic systems, sediment provenance and routing systems, nonmarine depositional processes.
Michael R HudecMichael R Hudec
Salt tectonics, 3-D computer modeling, kinematic models for evolution and growth of salt structures, structural geology, cross-section restoration and balancing, seismic interpretation
Martin P JacksonMartin P Jackson
The primary goal of my research lies in developing (1) strategies for predictive multiscale, multiphysics computational models which can be utilized to guide the rational design and fabrication of next generation nanoscale devices and (2) a detailed understanding of the relationship between the synthesis, structure, and properties of nanostructured materials and systems.
Joel P JohnsonJoel P Johnson
Process geomorphology, feedbacks between channel morphology and hydrology and sediment transport, landscape sensitivity to climate and lithology, bedrock river erosion, flash floods, arroyo erosion, canyon formation, debris flows, environmental monitoring and sensor networks, laboratory flume experimentation, numerical modeling, tsunami sediment transport and deposition.
Richard A KetchamRichard A Ketcham
High-resolution X-ray computed tomography, CT scanning, 3D image analysis, fission-track dating, thermochronology, structural geology, tectonics, digital morphology, trabecular bone
J. Richard KyleJ. Richard Kyle
Ore deposits geology, strata-controlled mineral resources, metals & industrial minerals exploration, ore petrology, characterization of ore-forming fluids, high resolution X-ray computed tomography applications to ore genesis & processing, geology of energy critical elements, resources & society, geology & mineral resources of Texas
John C LassiterJohn C Lassiter
Earth's origin and evolution, isotope and trace element geochemistry, the role of crust and lithospheric mantle recycling in the generation of mantle chemical heterogeneity, the origin and distribution of water and other volatile elements in the Earth's interior, and the thermal and chemical evolution of the Earth's core and core/mantle boundary
Stephen E LaubachStephen E Laubach
Structural diagenesis, structural geology, fracture analysis, fluid inclusion and cathodoluminescence studies, rock mechanics, mechanical and fracture stratigraphy, hydrocarbon exploration and development in deep and/or structurally complex areas, tight gas sandstone, coalbed methane, shale gas; geologic aspects of hydraulic fracturing, application of borehole-imaging geophysical logs to stress and fracture evaluation, structural evolution of North American Cordillera, fracture history of NW Scotland, regional fracture studies Argentina.
Luc L LavierLuc L Lavier
Tectonics; the structural and geodynamical evolution of continental and oceanic rifts, as well as collisional environments; numerical techniques to model tectonic processes on crustal and lithospheric scales; deformation; subduction
Lawrence A LawverLawrence A Lawver
Marine geophysics, plate tectonics, magnetics, gravity, heat flow, seismic studies, paleogeographic reconstructions of Gondwana, the Polar Regions, East Asia, and the Western Pacific
Jung-Fu  LinJung-Fu Lin
Mineral physics, physics and chemistry of planetary materials, solid-Earth geophysics and geochemistry, high-pressure diamond anvil cell, X-ray and laser spectroscopy
Randall MarrettRandall Marrett
Structural geology, tectonics, deformation processes in the upper continental crust, folds, faults, opening-mode fractures, fluid flow through fracture systems, applications of fractals, natural hazards
Kirk D McIntoshKirk D McIntosh
Structure and development of continental margins along convergent and transpressive plate boundaries; sediment accretion, subduction, and erosion at convergent margins; forearc and backarc extension and compression; fluid dynamics in accretionary prisms; shallow-subduction seismicity
Kitty L MillikenKitty L Milliken
Petrography and geochemistry of siliciclastic rocks; diagenesis; electron microbeam methods: X-ray mapping, cathodoluminescence imaging; micro-scale reservoir characterization
Sharon  MosherSharon Mosher
Structural petrology, field-oriented structural geology, the evolution of complexly deformed terranes, strain analysis, deformation mechanisms, the interaction between chemical and physical processes during deformation
Maria-Aikaterini  NikolinakouMaria-Aikaterini Nikolinakou
Maria-Katerina Nikolinakou is currently a Research Associate at the Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences, at the University of Texas at Austin. She works for the AGL and GeoFluids consortia. Maria is a Civil/Geotechnical Engineer. She received her Science Doctorate on Theoretical Soil Mechanics from MIT in 2008. She holds a M.Sc. in Geotechnical Engineering from MIT and a Civil Engineering degree from NTUA, Greece. Before joining the Jackson School, she worked ...
Timothy B RoweTimothy B Rowe
Vertebrate paleontology, evolution and development of the vertebrate skeleton, phylogenetic systematics, the early history of mammals and their extinct relatives among Synapsida, the history of birds and their extinct relatives among Dinosauria, the history of other amniotes, high-resolution X-ray computed tomography, CT scanner, DigiMorph, informatics
Mrinal K SenMrinal K Sen
Seismic wave propagation including anisotropy, geophysical inverse problems, earthquakes and earth structure, applied seismology, petroleum exploration including 4D seismology
Timothy M ShanahanTimothy M Shanahan
Paleoclimatology, paleoceanography, paleolimnology, sedimentary geology and geochemistry, organic geochemistry, isotope geochemistry, compound-specific stable isotope analysis
John M SharpJohn M Sharp
Hyrdogeology; flow in fractured rocks; thermohaline free convection; fracture skin effects; regional flow in carbonate rocks; hydrology of arid and semi-arid zones; subsidence and coastal land loss; effects of urbanization; alluvial aquifers; hydrogeology of sedimentary basins;hydrological processes in ore deposit formation; and hydrogeophysics.
Thomas H ShipleyThomas H Shipley
Marine seismology; subduction processes occurring at converging plate margins; the role of fluids in accretionary trench margins and their influence on the distribution of low-shear-strength fault zones; 3D seismic techniques
Ronald J SteelRonald J Steel
Dr. Steel's research is aimed at using clastic sedimentology to address problems in basin analysis, dynamic stratigraphy and clastic reservoirs. I am particularly interested to decipher the signatures of tectonics, climate, sea level change and sediment supply in stratigraphic successions.
Daniel  StockliDaniel Stockli (Theme Lead)
Thermo-/Geochronology, Tectonics and Structural Geology, Isotopic Provenance Analysis, Archeometry, Geothermal Exploration, and Thermal Maturation
Frederick W TaylorFrederick W Taylor
Tectonic geomorphology and stratigraphy at convergent plate margins Paleoclimate, fossil corals as a proxy for past sea-surface temperatures.
Estibalitz  UkarEstibalitz Ukar
Harm J Van AvendonkHarm J Van Avendonk
Van Avendonk is an active-source seismologist who specializes in the acquisition and inversion of seismic refraction data on land and at sea. Often these seismic refraction data are used for a tomographic inversion. The resultant seismic velocity models help us to interpret the composition of the Earthís crust and mantle, the geometry of sedimentary basins, and the structure of plate boundaries.
Laura Wallace
Crustal deformation, GPS/Geodesy, active plate boundary processes, subduction tectonics, geohazards
Jake WalterJake Walter
ice sheet and glacier dynamics, tectonic tremor and slow slip, earthquakes, seismic triggering of earthquakes and other phenomena
Lesli J WoodLesli J Wood
Outcrop analysis of clastic systems architecture and sequence stratigraphy; seismic geomorphology and sedimentology of clastic systems; tectonics and sedimentation of active margin basins; shallow hydrocarbon features and shale diapirism; remotely sensed study (lidar, 2-D, 3-D and multicomponent seismic multibeam bathymetry and sonar) of clastic depositional systems.
Christopher K ZahmChristopher K Zahm
Reservoir characterization, flow modeling in fractured reservoirs, porosity-permeability evolution

Postdoctoral Researchers


Owen A AnfinsonOwen A Anfinson
Specializes in the use of heavy mineral geochronology and thermochronology to understand the geologic evolution of sedimentary basins and their source regions. Past Research Topics Include: Ph.D.- New Insights into Arctic Tectonics: U-Pb, (U-Th)/He, and Hf Isotopic data from the Franklinian Basin, Canadian Arctic Islands; M.S.- Sediment Sources for Catastrophic Glacial Outburst Flood Rhythmites and Quaternary Eolian Deposits at the Hanford Reach National Monument, Washington; B.A.- Stratigraphy and ...
Celia  DalouCelia Dalou
Experimental petrology, high-pressure experiments, volatiles cycle in the mantle, halogens in melts minerals and fluids, halogens and trace elements partitioning during mantle melting
Zhiqiang  FanZhiqiang Fan
Poroelastic modeling of sedimentary basins, Fracture and damage mechanics of rocks, Borehole stability, Natural and Induced hydraulic fracture, Fluid injection induced earthquake
George B FisherGeorge B Fisher
Tectonic and Fluvial Geomorphology, Cosmogenic and Fallout Radionuclides, Remote Sensing, Spatial Analyses
Ryan McKenzieRyan McKenzie
I am broadly interested in Earth surface system evolution, thus my research focuses on sedimentary geology, geochemistry, and paleontology. My field-based projects utilize integrative methods that include detrital zircon geochronology and provenance, carbonate isotope geochemistry, paleontology and biostratigraphy.
Andrew J SmyeAndrew J Smye
Radiogenic isotope systematics of metamorphic rocks; U-Th-Pb geochronology; 40Ar/39Ar thermochronology; Thermal models of crustal evolution; Metamorphic petrology; Phase equilibria calculations; Exhumation mechanisms; Subduction-related devolatisation; Fluid--mineral/rock interaction
Hejun  ZhuHejun Zhu
Seismic inversion based on full wavefield information; Statistic inverse problems and uncertainty quantification; Seismic structure of the crust and upper mantle; Numerical simulations of seismic wave propagation

Adjunct/Emeritus Faculty‚Äč & Research Scientists


Douglas  SmithDouglas Smith
Research on mantle evolution using tools of mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry.
James T SprinkleJames T Sprinkle
Invertebrate paleontology; evolutionary biology; fossil and living echinoderms; echinoderm systematics; Paleozoic marine communities and ecosystems; paleoecology; crinoids; blastoids; rhombiferans; eocrinoids; parablastoids; blastozoans; edrioasteroids; edrioblastoids; starfish; stylophorans; ctenocystoids; helicoplacoids; Cambrian evolutionary fauna; Paleozoic evolutionary fauna; Ordovician radiation; Cambrian explosion; environment & earth science
Paul L StoffaPaul L Stoffa
Multichannel seismic acquisition, signal processing, acoustic and elastic wave propagation, modeling and inversion of geophysical data
Robert H TathamRobert H Tatham
Dr. Tatham's research is presently on interpretation and analysis of multi-component seismic data. In particular, by considering both seismic P-wave and S-wave data, many of the effects of solid rock properties and pore-fluid properties may be separated.

Research Staff


Rodrigo A Fernandez-VasquezRodrigo A Fernandez-Vasquez
Glacial geology, marine geology, tectonics, tectonics-climate-glacial interactions, sedimentary processes on fjords, rivers and coastal environments, paleomagnetism (block rotations, anisotropy of susceptibility). Current Spatial/Temporal areas of research: Cz/Pleistocene-Holocene of Patagonia and the Antarctic Peninsula.
Tucker F HentzTucker F Hentz
Siliciclastic sequence stratigraphy, sandstone petrology, continental depositional systems, field mapping and stratigraphy
Eric W JamesEric W James
Isotope geochemistry, igneous petrology, analytical chemistry
Alison M Koleszar
Staci L LoewyStaci L Loewy
Jiemin  LuJiemin Lu
Diagenesis; CO2-rock-water geochemistry; stable isotopes; geology, geochemistry, and basin modeling related to CO2 geological storage.
Nathaniel R MillerNathaniel R Miller
Sedimentary geochemistry, isotope geochemistry, Earth system evolution, Q-ICP-MS, microanalytics, GIS, Neoproterozoic climate
Ian O NortonIan O Norton
Plate tectonics, structural evolution of continental margins, reconciliation of observations from structural geology with regional tectonics
Robert M ReedRobert M Reed
Microstructural analysis of rocks, particularly small-scale deformation structures and pores in mudrocks.
Douglas  SmithDouglas Smith
Research on mantle evolution using tools of mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry.
Donggao  ZhaoDonggao Zhao
Electron microbeam and X-ray techniques, mantle mineralogy and petrology, environmental mineralogy, nuclear waste management, and materials science.

Graduate Students


Tricia G AlvarezTricia G Alvarez
Tricia Alvarez is a PhD student at the Jackson School of Geosciences at The University of Texas at Austin. She completed a B.Sc. in Geology at The University of the West Indies in 2001 and an M.S. in Geosciences at the University of Texas at Austin in 2008. Her research interest at the Jackson School of Geosciences is focused on the study of sedimentary basins in the context of their tectonic setting with emphasis on ...
Veronica J AndersonVeronica J Anderson
My research focuses on understanding the tectonic history of the Eastern Cordillera using a variety of methods, with an emphasis on using paleoclimatic proxies to understand the effects of surface uplift on Colombian climate. I have utilized organic geochemical proxies for paleotemperature (the MBT/CBT index) and for the isotopic composition of rainfall (hydrogen isotopes in leaf waxes) in order to quantify surface uplift in the Eastern Cordillera. I am also analyzing sedimentary provenance data ...
Kate Atakturk
Understanding metamorphic core complexes in western Turkey through petrological, geochemical, and geochronologic work. Focus on metamorphic petrology and studying garnets to identify the pressure, temperature, and crystallization timing recorded by metamorphic rocks. Using data to construct structural interpretation of the region's formation.
Rachel  BernardRachel Bernard
My research, under the guidance of Dr. Whitney Behr, focuses on using peridotite xenoliths to better constrain the rheology of the upper mantle.
Meredith A Bush
Meredith is a fourth year PhD student, focusing on the evolution of contractional mountain belts and intra-continental basins. Meredith is interested in the tectonics of sedimentary basins in intra-continental settings, clastic sedimentology and provenance analysis. Her current field areas include the Qaidam basin on the Tibetan Plateau, the Raton basin in Colorado and New Mexico, and the Galisteo-El Rito basin of New Mexico. Her research includes a variety of analytical techniques, including magnetostratigraphy, detrital mineral ...
Benjamin L ByerlyBenjamin L Byerly
I use the major element, trace element, and isotopic (Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf-Os) chemistry of abyssal peridotites and mantle xenoliths to understand the evolution of the lithospheric and asthenospheric mantle.
Owen A CallahanOwen A Callahan
My research is focussed on the interplay between fault and fracture permeability, hydrothermal fluid flow, alteration, mechanical properties, and deformation. I am currently working on projects in Dixie Valley, NV, and in the North Cascades, WA. I worked as a geologist in the geothermal industry for 5 years before returning to graduate school.
Amanda Z CalleAmanda Z Calle
My research is focused on the Cenozoic sedimentary, structural and exhumational history of the Eastern Cordillera to modern Chaco foreland basin in southern Bolivia. A multidisciplinary approach of source-to-sink, geochronology, low-temperature thermochronology and structural mapping will be used. Inherited pre-Andean structures and their response to contractional settings will also be evaluated to decipher the Cenozoic evolution of this part of the Central Andes.
Tomas N CapaldiTomas N Capaldi
I am a first year PhD student, focusing on Cenozoic to modern tectonic evolution of the dissected Bermejo foreland basin in western Argentina. My research involves clastic sedimentology and stratigraphy, provenance and geochronology, low-temperature thermochronology, and petrography. By applying these various techniques I will better understand the style and timing of upper-crustal deformation associated with ongoing Pampean flat slap subduction.
Michael Cloos
Drew R Eddy
Sarah George
Sarah is a first year masterís student focused on the interplay between regional tectonics and sedimentation. Specifically, she is working on elucidating the timing and mechanisms of shortening, exhumation, and basin evolution in the Andes of northern Peru. Methods include field work, U-Pb geochronology and (U-Th)/He thermochronology.
Adam S Goldsmith
Understanding the role of radiation damage on helium diffusion kinetics in zircon through the characterization of alpha-radiation damage by Raman spectroscopy a la Nasdala, et al 1995,2001,2004.
Nicole HartNicole Hart
Modern thermochronometric dating techniques have become increasingly powerful tools with a diverse range of applications in quantifying tectonic and sedimentary processes at rifted continental margins. While detrital zircon U-Pb is commonly used in detrital provenance studies, zircon (U-Th)/He (ZHe) dating has been shown to be a complimentary tool that not only constrains sediment provenance, but also the exhumation history of a sediment source region(s). In particular, analysis of ZHe lag time - time ...
Emily Hernandez GoldsteinEmily Hernandez Goldstein
I am currently pursuing my PhD under the supervision of Daniel Stockli. My research combines geochemistry, mineralogy and plate tectonics to better understand how minerals form, water-rock interactions, and the thermal and temporal evolution of ocean-continent transitions. I am developing a method that uses magnetite to date serpentinites in order to better understand how continents break up to form oceans. My research interests broadly involve novel geo/thermochronology techniques with applications to tectonics.
Lily  JacksonLily Jackson
My current research focuses on determining timing and magnitude of major paleo-elevation changes affecting the Peruvian Andes. My current methods include detrital zircon geochronology, hydrogen stable isotope paleoaltimetery with volcanic glasses, and traditional methods in sedimentology.
Jacob S Jordan
Kory L Kirchner
Alissa J Kotowski
Chang Lu
Chelsea Mackaman-Lofland
My research focuses on the structural and tectonic evolution of the Argentine Andes. I will be using a combination of structural analysis and thermochronometry to provide modern age constraints for deformation and exhumation events in the Frontal and Pre-Cordillera. Ultimately, this work seeks to relate observed crustal shortening and related age constraints to the structures observed at depth (significantly, at the transition from normal to flat-slab subduction) in order to better characterize the mechanisms that ...
Alison MacnameeAlison Macnamee
My research focuses on the evolution of geothermal systems, extensional tectonics, and integrated applications of thermochronometry. I study the relationship between geothermal fluid flow and the structural settings that host these systems. In doing so I employ a range of thermochronometers including apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He and 4He/3He techniques to elucidate the thermal and tectonic evolution of extensional provinces, and to record thermal events associated with fluid flow. By testing the sensitivity of ...
Jonathan  MajorJonathan Major
I consider myself primarily an applied structural geologist and tectonicist, but I have a wide range of interests and research experiences. My current research is focused on understanding the interactions between structures, fracturing, and geochemistry, primarily focusing on fracture systems found in mudrocks. My dissertation project is assessing fault and top seal behavior in CO2-rich systems by looking at an natural analog near Green River, Utah. I am combining field work, experimental geomechanics, petrography, ...
Edward W Marshall
My current research project looks at mantle hydration and metastomatism underneath the Colorado Plateau. My research will look into the timing and circumstances of the alteration as well as the rheologic implications on the stable Colorado Plateau. Prior research has been in the petrology and geochemistry of the Allsaw Anorthosite in the Ontario Grenville province, oxygen fugacity of the upper zone of the Bushveld Complex and the serpentinites of the Philadelphia area.
Renas I MohammedRenas I Mohammed
Renas is working on the Zagros fold-thrust belt and foreland basin in Iraq's northern region, Kurdistan. His fields of interest are assessing the effect of sedimentation on deformation sequence and styles, and the controls on wedge dynamics of the northwestern Zagros orogenic belt. He is also interested in understanding the competitive role of axial and transverse drainages in filling sedimentary foreland basins and how sediment dispersal pattern change in response to thrust propagation. In his ...
Stephanie J MooreStephanie J Moore
My research interests are focused on small-scale processes in metamorphic systems and include: crystallization of porphyroblasts, chemical equilibrium/disequilibrium, rare-earth element and trace element zoning in garnet, and geochemistry of fluid infiltration.
Nicholas D PerezNicholas D Perez
My work focuses on understanding the Cenozoic deformation history of the central Andes of southern Peru. I use a mix of basin analysis (sedimentology/stratigraphy, provenance, geochronology) and structural (field mapping, balanced cross sections, thermochronology) techniques. With this work I will address questions regarding the timing and mechanisms responsible for crustal thickening found in the central Andes. I am also interested in how inherited structures influence subsequent shortening and basin development in orogens.
Michael G PriorMichael G Prior
My current research focuses on brittle deformation within the lower plate of metamorphic core complexes. I am using a combination of structural analysis and apatite (U-Th)/He dating to determine the fault-slip history along low-angle normal faults (LANFs). The Bullfrog Hills and Bare Mountain in westernmost Nevada expose several LANF splays that have exhumed Proterozoic to Devonian rocks during southern Walker Lane transtensional deformation. The cooling history of detachment splays has important implications for the ...
Sebastian G RamirezSebastian G Ramirez
I am currently working on two sub-projects. The first aims at understanding the conditions of Kumano forearc basin (offshore Japan) nucleation and early evolution through 3D-seismic and sandstone petrography provenance analyses. The second involves the study of the Cretaceous-to-Recent sedimentary record in the northernmost Neuquen basin (western Argentina) through traditional field work and detrital zircon analysis. My goal is to better constrain the timing and characteristics of early Andean compression and to test whether or ...
Sean M SanguinitoSean M Sanguinito
My research is focused on using low temperature thermochronometers such as apatite fission track, and apatite and zircon (U-Th/He) to explore unroofing styles of metamorphic core complexes. Specifically I am attempting to determine if displacement during the evolution of unroofing changes from low angle detachment faulting to high angle normal faults. My two field areas are the Harcuvar Mountains in western Arizona and the Santa Catalina-Rincon Mountains in southeastern Arizona.
Nikki M SeymourNikki M Seymour
I am a field geologist whose particular interests are structural geology and tectonics. My research uses geo- and thermochronology to understand the timing and thermal structure of continental rifting at magma-poor margins to answer an outstanding question in plate tectonics -- How do you break a continent?
Timothy A ShinTimothy A Shin
Expertise: Tectonics and Structural Geology, Thermo-/Geochronology, Petrology, and Geochemistry. I am interested in crustal and lithospheric dynamics and how they affect our environment and planet. I like to combine field-based geological, structural, and petrological observations with geo-/thermo- chonometric and geochemical analyses to elucidate the fundamental processes that drive the tectonics that have and continue to shape our world and resources. I am interested in a range of problems from extensional to contractional tectonics ...
Pamela  SpecialePamela Speciale
My research interests include paleopiezometry, rock mechanics and strain localization in the lithospheric mantle. I am examining stress-grainsize relationships in feldspar and orthopyroxene in naturally deformed rocks, in an effort to test experimental extrapolations of these relationships to estimating stress in the lithosphere. I am also exploring the mechanisms and longevity of strain localization in the lithospheric mantle through experimental deformation of dry olivine aggregates.
John M Swartz
Xinyue  TongXinyue Tong
My research interest focuses on understanding the deep-Earth geodynamics and seismology using laboratory mineral physics results. Specifically, I am interested in using laser spectroscopic techniques coupled with high-pressure diamond anvil to investigate transport properties of mantle minerals at extreme pressures and temperatures.
Marin C Trautman
Guangliang  WuGuangliang Wu
My research focuses on tectonics, geodynamics and structural geology coupling numerical simulations and geological/geophysical data. I am a geologist and geophysicist. I observe, record, and analyze geological and geophysical phenomena to single out the most important controlling factors. Using these information I develop conceptual models. Then I do forward and inverse geodynamics modeling constrained by the geological and geophysical data to gain insight into geological/geophysical problems, and to understand how they evolve through ...
Yu Xia
Jing  YangJing Yang
My Area of Expertise: Diamond Anvil Cells, Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction, Conventional X-ray Diffraction, Brillouin Light Spectroscopy, Impulsive Stimulated Light Scattering, Raman Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, Electron Probe Mircron-analyzer, Matlab Programming
Graduate Student Position in Mineral Physics Lab (Graduate)
The mineral physics lab at the Department of Geological Sciences, Jackson School of Geosciences, the University of Texas at Austin invites applications for graduate student positions towards a Master's or Ph.D. degree in mineral physics. The Jackson School of Geosciences has exceptionally well-funded research programs and offers a number of scholarships to support graduate students for an extended period of time. Candidates with strong background and/or interest in physics (solid state physics), math, and geophysics/geochemistry are strongly encouraged to apply. Our mineral physics research programs focuses on high pressure-temperature experimental studies on materials properties using synchrotron X-ray and optical spectroscopies in a diamond anvil cell. Information about the graduate student programs at the Jackson School is available at: http://www.jsg.utexas.edu/. Please contact Dr. Jung-Fu Lin at afu@jsg.utexas.edu for further information.
Posted by: Jung-Fu Lin

 
Innovative Detrital Provenance Studies - Double Dating PLUS (Graduate)
A major thrust of my current research the development and application of more comprehensive isotopic detrital provenance tools. U-Pb on zircon is clearly the big work horse, but only goes so far and sometimes yields "no" useful info, e.g., if the source of the sediment is mostly recycled sediment. We have extensively pursued double dating of zircons by U-Pb and He, as zircon He ages yield very interesting insights into the thermal and tectonic history of the source terrane; often yielding very different insights than crystallization ages. The combination is powerful, but I think we can take things so much farther by combining double dating with other constrains. People have tried fission track (not precise enough), Hf/Hf (to get mantle separation model ages), etc., but what we want to do and are working on is really Double Dating ++, combining zircon U-Pb-He dating with a variety of other geochemical aspects to more comprehensive understand detrital provenance and improve paleo-tectonic reconstructions. For example, trace-element thermometry (Ti in zirc), REE on zircon (met vs mag origin), Hf/Hf (see above), oxygen isotopes, etc. and also to develop rutile in an analogous manner (e.g., Zr in rut thermometry, Cr/Nb ratio (mafic vs granulitic), REE, etc.). The sky is the limit and what can learn so much. The issue in part it, how much can a single grain tell us before it's gone? The project sounds very laboratory oriented, but it's really a combination of field and lab work. We have identified a few possible case study areas, e.g., Morocco; great exposures, long-lived and preserved record of basin deposition since the Precambrian. My group is already working on some case studies in NE Africa (Egypt), Sevier FTB and foreland basin, and the Colombian Llanos and Magdalena Basins.
Posted by: Daniel Stockli

 
Exhumation of the Central Alps, Switzerland (Graduate)
Being Swiss, I have had a long-standing interest in the Alps and over the past few yearsI have had two students working on the exhumation of the eastern Alps (Engadin) and the Molasse foreland basin. Over the past decade different models have explored the role of climate (incl. Messinian salinity crisis) vs tectonics (out-of-sequence thrusting etc.). The exhumation of the northern Alpine external massives (esp. central Aar Massif) in Switzerland is key in solving this problem. We have a detailed study in the western Aar Massif and it has really questioned a lot of the thinking in terms of the late-stage structural and tectonic reconstruction of the Alps and the evolution of the Alpine critical taper. This is also a project a lot of people would be very interested in in terms of the results. I have collected some samples, but a lot more work needs to be done in the field and the laboratory. Some of the sampling might require good fitness etc. or more. In addition to surface sampling, there are also a lot of tunnels and the potential of 3D modeling to really understand and solve this problem.
Posted by: Daniel Stockli

 
Research in structural diagenesis (Graduate or Undergraduate)
Fundamental and applied research on fractures, particularly as these studies apply to petroleum reservoirs, is conducted under the auspices of the Fracture Research and Application Consortium at The University of Texas at Austin. The academic program of research, mentoring and teaching is led by staff of the Bureau of Economic Geology, the Department of Petroleum & Geosystems Engineering and the Department of Geological Sciences. Students in the Energy & Earth Resources Graduate Program also participate in FRAC sponsored research projects. For further information on opportunities for fracture studies within the program see the FRAC pages on opportunities in Geology, Petroleum Engineering, Geophysics, and Energy Economics. FRAC welcomes Visiting Scientists from industry and from other academic institutions. Contact Steve Laubach for more information about these opportunities. A key part of the FRAC academic program is the Structural Diagenesis Initiative, a new teaching and mentoring perspective on interacting mechanical and chemical processes at high crustal levels in the Earth. For more information on the initiative see the Structural Diagenesis Initiative web site. If you are a prospective student, please see the admissions information on the Petroleum & Geosystems Engineering or Jackson School of Geosciences web sites.
Posted by: Stephen Laubach

 
General Opportunities in Field and Laboratory Based Studies (Graduate or Undergraduate)
My position does not permit sole supervision of graduate student theses, but I co-supervise or serve on graduate student theses committees, particularly those involving aspects of GIS, GPS, structural geology, tectonics and petrology/mineralogy. I have supervised several undergraduate student honors thesis, both lab- and field-based, and look forward to continuing to do so.
Posted by: Mark Helper

 
Granitic rocks from the Biga Peninsula of western Turkey (Graduate or Undergraduate)
This project involves a field, geochemical and geochronological study of a number of granite plutons located in the Biga Peninsula of western Turkey. The objective is to decipher their tectonomagmatic histories to understand large-scale dynamics of extension in the back-arc of the northern Aegean. Back-arc basins are major components of numerous subduction zones around the world and deciphering the processes occurring in the Aegean back-arc region allows us to evaluate the role of the subducting slab, a prior tectonic history, strike-slip dynamics, and magma migration in the development of these key plate tectonic features. The Aegean is atypical of back-arc basins in general, and a number of processes complicate its geology, including the closure of branches of Tethyan oceans and strike-slip deformation. How the geology of the Biga Peninsula links to that of Greece and Bulgaria is also debated. Data generated in this project will be used to evaluate models for Aegean extension and to understand how the geology of the Biga Peninsula relates to that elsewhere in the region. Elements that are fundamental to models for Aegean extension are located in the field area, including Tethyan sutures, extensional structures, and active strands of the North Anatolian Shear Zone. With Dr. Tolga Oyman (Dokuz Eylul University)
Posted by: Elizabeth Catlos

 
Geochronology of the Ordovician (Graduate or Undergraduate)
The Ordovician time scale is bracketed by major extinction events, including one that is the 2nd largest in Earth's history. The goal of this project is to date zircon grains collected from bentonite (clay-rich) samples from Ordovician exposures from a range of locations (Canada, US, Scandinavia) to further understand the late Ordovician Hirnantian Ice Age and the big end Ordovician extinction. The project would involve analysis of sedimentary and volcanic rocks, petrology, geochemistry, zircon geochronology, and tectonic interpretations. With Dr. Michael Brookfield (Univ. Mass Boston)
Posted by: Elizabeth Catlos

 
Nature, age, and emplacement of ophiolite complexes in NW India (Graduate or Undergraduate)
During the mid-Mesozoic to Eocene, the Indian subcontinent moved over 60 degrees latitude north towards Asia, closing the ancient Neo-Tethyan Ocean. This ocean plays a central role in reconstructing a number of orogenic systems extending from Europe to Asia, but debated issues remain because exposures of the former ocean and its sub-basins are affected by plate collision, arc and terrane accretion, and later deformation. The goal of this project is to date and geochemical analyze an isolated basic-ultrabasic massif that overlies shelf limestones of the northern Indian passive margin in NW India. The ophiolite body currently has no comprehensive published geochemical studies which would allow comparison with other complexes across the Himalayan range and its ages have large errors. The project involves geochronology of metamorphosed mafic igneous rocks, petrology, and tectonic interpretations. With Profs. M. Brookfield (Univ. Mass Boston) and G.M. Bhatt (Univ. Jammu).
Posted by: Elizabeth Catlos

 
International Research Experiences for Students (IRES): Closing Oceans: Assessing the Dynamics of Turkish suture zones (Graduate or Undergraduate)
I currently have a proposal in review with the National Science Foundation that requests funds to provide 4 weeks of geological field-based research and training experiences across Turkey for undergraduate and graduate students. They will conduct research within a multidisciplinary, regional framework focusing on investigating arc accretion processes that occurred in Turkey during the closure of branches of ancient ocean basins. Because of its Tethyan suture zones and fragments, Turkey is an ideal location to develop models for accretionary orogenesis and how continents grow. Students will partner with Turkish researchers to explore a multidisciplinary range of geological concepts discussed in their courses while making a significant impact on our understanding of processes related to the formation of continental crust. Students will visit field areas across Turkey to develop a regional-scale perspective. All IRES students will undego an intense pre- and post-departure program developed with the assistance of Turkish colleagues and numerous UT Austin resources. If funded, recruitment will begin in Fall 2015. The recruitment plan is geared towards attracting members of underrepresented groups and all IRES student participants will be US citizens or permanent residents, as required by the program solicitation. We target high-achieving graduate students and sophomore level undergraduates or internal transfers majoring in geology because others at higher levels will likely have time constraints on their summers due to degree-required field camp. Consideration will also be made for students attending other geoscience departments in Texas outside the Jackson School. With Drs. Rich Kyle and Brent Elliott (Jackson School); Tolga Oyman (Dokuz Eylul University, Dept. Geological Engineering), Bora Rojay (Middle East Technical University, METU Dept. of Geological Engineering) and Sebnem Duzgun (METU Dept. of Mining Engineering), and Aykut Akgun (Karadeniz Technical University, Dept. Geological Engineering).
Posted by: Elizabeth Catlos

 
Fault and fracture processes, structural diagenesis (Graduate)
Graduate student projects combine the fields of fault and fracture mechanics and low-temperature geochemistry addressing deformation mechanisms of the upper crust, structural control of mass and heat transfer in sedimentary basins, the effects of chemical mass transfer on the mechanical and hydraulic behavior of fractures and faults, and the chemical interaction between fluids and minerals. Projects usually require the integration of field and laboratory analytical or numerical work and preference goes to applicants that are equally comfortable in the field and in the lab. Research topics include field- and core-based structural geology, geomechanics, geofluids, geochemistry, and natural resources including CO2 sequestration. A current research emphasis lies in Structural Diagenesis which combines the traditionally separate fields of brittle structural geology and diagenesis/geochemistry. Preference goes to PhD applicants with a prior MS degree and MS applicants with undergraduate research experience, preferentially through completion of a senior's thesis. Applications should be submitted to the MS or PhD program in Geological Sciences (GEO). Please contact Peter Eichhubl (peter.eichhubl@beg.utexas.edu for further details.
Posted by: Peter Eichhubl

 
(U-Th)/He Geo- and Thermochronometry Lab(U-Th)/He Geo- and Thermochronometry Lab
The UT (U-Th)/He Geo- and Thermochronometry Laboratory is a state-of-the art facility for the development of (U-Th) dating and its applications to tectonics, petrology, volcanology, stratigraphy, geomorphology, and geoarcheology. The facility houses: (1) 3 fully-automated UHV He extraction lines with 2 diode lasers, 1 Nd:YAG lasers, cryogenic purification systmes, quadrupole mass-specs, and step-heating apparati for diffusion measurements, (2) a Helix SFT magnetic sector noble gas mass-spectrometer with automated UHV gas extraction system with diode and excimer laser, (3) two Element2 HR-ICP-MS instruments for solution and laser ablation analysis for thermo- and geochronometery, as well as a dedicated clean room and sample preparation laboratories.

Academic Seismic Portal at UTIGAcademic Seismic Portal at UTIG
The portal is the gateway to the Marine Seismic Data Center (MSDC). MSDC's goal is to support education and research with access to and preservation of academic active-source seismic data. Our partner, the Academic Seismic Portal at LDEO, has a complementary seismic inventory primarily of field data. These cooperating data centers, part of the Marine Geoscience Data System, are supported by the National Science Foundation.

Cathodoluminescence SystemCathodoluminescence System
The desktop cathodoluminescence system provides valuable visual information from rocks and minerals not seen using regular light petrography or other electron beam equipment. Here, electrons bombard a regular rock thin section and the sample glows in visible light. A high-resolution digital camera captures the images. Applications include examining carbonate textures, quartz overgrowths and filled fractures in sedimentary rocks and understanding mineral zoning and fluid interactions in intrusive igneous rocks.

Core Research Center (Austin)Core Research Center (Austin)
The Austin Core Research Center (CRC), located adjacent to Bureau headquarters, is the Bureau of Economic Geology's main core repository for core and rock material donated to the university. More than 500,000 boxes of core and cuttings from wells drilled throughout Texas, the U.S., and the world are available at this facility for public viewing and research. Austin, Houston, and Midland core facilities have combined holdings of nearly 2 million boxes of geologic material. The Integrated Core and Log Database (IGOR) is a searchable database for all CRC core and well cutting holdings. Public facilities include core examination layout rooms and processing rooms for slabbing core. Other services are available upon request.

Core Research Center (Houston)Core Research Center (Houston)
The Houston Research Center (HRC), is located on the west side of Houston, Texas, six miles north of I-10 and two miles south of U.S. Highway 290. This state-of-the-art climate-controlled facility is equipped to permanently store and curate over 900,000 boxes of geologic core and cuttings. The Houston, Austin, and Midland core facilities have combined holdings of nearly 2 million boxes of geologic material. In addition to the climate-controlled core and cuttings warehouse, the HRC complex has offices, laboratories, and a well-lit core layout room available for visiting scientists. There are also two conference rooms to accommodate guests attending short courses and seminars. Other services are available upon request. Nominal fees are charged to rent table space and to view core. The HRC has space dedicated for storing samples and cores acquired by NSF-funded research. The HRC curates this material and facilitates continued access to the material by researchers. The Integrated Core and Log Database (IGOR) is a searchable database for all core and well cutting holdings.

Devine Geophysical Test SiteDevine Geophysical Test Site
The 100-acre Devine Test Site (DTS) is located less than 50 miles southwest of San Antonio, Texas, in Medina County, Texas. The site is managed by the Exploration Geophysics Laboratory (EGL), an Industrial Associate Program at the Bureau of Economic Geology. It is a state-of-the-art public-domain geophysical research facility for academia and industry donated to the university in 1998 by BP. The test site is used for surface-based seismic and potential-field experiments performed in conjunction with downhole and crosswell experiments.

Dual-frequency Geodetic Quality GPS ReceiversDual-frequency Geodetic Quality GPS Receivers
We have 5 Trimble Net-RS receivers, tripods, choke ring antennas. One is with Tiffany Caudle at BEG used to support the Optech Lidar system. The other 4 are in JGB 3.122 and used by various groups.

Electron MicroprobeElectron Microprobe
Installed in 2002-2003, the JEOL JXA-8200 electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) is equipped with five wavelength dispersive spectrometers (WDS), an energy dispersive detector (EDS), and two image detectors in secondary and backscattered electron modes. The primary aim of the microprobe is quantitative elemental analysis of minerals on a microscale with high precision (less than a percent relative for major constituents) and low detection limits (commonly a few tens to few hundreds ppm)

Environmental Scanning Electron MicroscopeEnvironmental Scanning Electron Microscope
Installed in the fall of 2001, this is a 30 kV tungsten gun high-resolution environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) with a 3.5 nm resolution in high vacuum, low vacuum, and environmental modes at 30 kV. The ESEM is equiped with a Peltier cooled stage, a heating stage, an EDS sytem (EDAX), a EBSD system (HKL Ė Oxford Instruments), and a cathodoluminescence detector (Gatan).

Experimental Petrology LabExperimental Petrology Lab
A state-of-the-art laboratory that consists of three DelTech furnaces for TZM-style pressure vessels and eleven cold-seal pressure vessel systems, four of which are equipped with rapid-quench capabilities. The pressure line for the cold-seal vessels allows for controlled, continuous decompressions. Combined, the experimental facilities allow experiments to be run at up to ~1250 degrees C and from atmospheric to 4000 bars pressure, depending on temperature. The lab also is equipped with a one-atmosphere gas-mixing furnace for homogenization of glasses in controlled atmospheres. Recent funding from the National Science Foundation will allow the laboratory to acquire a Piston Cylinder Apparatus to allow experimental conditions to be extended to 1700 degrees C and up to 4 GPa (40,000 bars) pressure.

Fission Track Thermochronology LaboratoryFission Track Thermochronology Laboratory
Enables analysis of fission tracks in apatite and zircon to constrain the low-temperature time-temperature (t-T) history of sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks.

Fluid Inclusion Lab (DGS)Fluid Inclusion Lab (DGS)
The fluid inclusion laboratory is based around a modified USGS-type gas-flow heating/freezing stage capable of microthermometry of fluid inclusions over a range of 700° to -180°C. The stage is mounted on an Olympus BX51 microscope with a 40X long-working distance objective, 2X image magnifier, and digital camera for image capture. The microscope also has capability for UV fluorescence petrography. Complementary facilities are available for reflected and transmitted light petrography and image capture.

Geometrics GEODE Seismograph SystemsGeometrics GEODE Seismograph Systems
The Department has 2 boxes (total 48 Channels) with 48 vertical phones and 16 3 component phones).

Geophysical Equipment for GlaciologyGeophysical Equipment for Glaciology
We have a custom built, low-frequency, short-pulse, ground-based radar system to image deep (>100 m) internal layers and the base of the ice sheet. Frequencies used with this system include 1, 2, 5 and 10 MHz. We also have a GSSI high-frequency (100MHz) ground-based radar system which can be used in several configurations and with a range of antennae frequencies. In addition, we have 7 GNSS GPS units for high-precision positioning, as well as multiple data loggers and time-lapse cameras for use in glaciological settings.

Geophysics SoftwareGeophysics Software
Landmark and Geoquest software is used for processing and interpreting 3 dimensional seismic data.

High Temp. Stable Isotope LabHigh Temp. Stable Isotope Lab
This newly renovated lab is overseen by Jaime Barnes and houses a ThermoElectron MAT 253 with associated peripheral devices and instrumentation (TC/EA, GasBench II, Conflo IV, online silicate laser extraction line, general purpose vacuum extraction lines, Cl purification line). Instrumentation permits measurements of the stable H, C, N, O, S, and Cl isotope ratios of silicate, phosphate, and carbonate minerals, volcanic gases, air, and waters

High-Resolution X-ray Computed Tomography FacilityHigh-Resolution X-ray Computed Tomography Facility
Provides high resolution non-destructive, density maps of solid samples (rocks, fossils, etc) up to a maximum size of 50 cm diameter by 150 cm high (50 kg mass). Equipment: An industrial CT scanner that is an adaptation of medical CAT scanners.

Hockley Seismic StationHockley Seismic Station
Part of the USGS Seismic Network, the Hockley Station vault is 472 meters below surface in a salt mine. Site Geology: Located in the Willis Formation that is made of clay, silt, sand, and minor siliceous gravel. Deposited in the lower Pleistocene and is approximately 200 feet thick.

HR-ICP Mass Spectrometers
Equipment available: Thermo Element2 HR-ICP-MS with ESI autosampler system for solutions; and Thermo Element2 HR-ICP-MS with Photonmachines Analyte G2 Excimer laser ablation system.

Infrared (FTIR) SpectroscopyInfrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy
This lab uses Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) analyses to measure dissolved water and carbon in natural and experimental silicate glasses. The lab is equipped with a Thermo Electron Nicolet 6700 FTIR spectrometer and Continuum IR microscope, equipped with automated x-y-z stage and stage purge system so that the spectrometer, microscope, and sample position are all purged with dry air that has <10 ppm CO2 for very precise measurements of CO2 poor glasses. Dedicated polishing facilities are also available for sample preparation.

Isotope Clean Lab (Lassiter)Isotope Clean Lab (Lassiter)
Within the Department of Geological Sciences there are three clean-room laboratories supplied with HEPA-filtered class 100 air where sample preparation and ion-exchange chromatography for isotopic analysis may be done under ultra-clean conditions, making possible very low analytical blanks (e.g., < 1 pg Pb for U-Pb geochronology, and <10 pg Sr). There are also two other laboratories with HEPA-filtered work stations where sample preparation and ion-exchange chromatography are performed. These labs are affiliated with the Mineral Separation Facility (see description).

Mineral Physics LabMineral Physics Lab
The Mineral Physics Laboratory has a variety of diamond anvil cells (DACs) and relevant facilities that allow the study of planetary materials (minerals, fluids, glasses, single-crystal and polycrystalline compounds) under under extreme high pressure-temperature conditions. The DACs are integrated with laser and synchrotron X-ray spectroscopic techniques to probe material properties.

Mineral Separation Facility
Includes shatterboxes for sample pulverization, a crusher, a disc mill pulverizer, a Rogers table, a Wilfly table, a mica table, sieves, heavy liquids and Franz magnetic separators for mineral separation.

Ocean-Bottom Seismometer (OBS)Ocean-Bottom Seismometer (OBS)
An Ocean-Bottom Seismometer (OBS) is a seismometer that can be deployed on the seafloor for weeks or months, recording either earthquakes or man-made seismic signals. To withstand pressures at large depth (up to 5500 m) in the oceans, all electronics of this instrument are kept inside a glass sphere which can withstand such pressures. The sensors of all instruments (discussed below) include a 3-component accelerometer and a hydrophone, all designed for seismic data with a dominant frequency near 10 Hz. The seismic data are recorded on flash memory. Correct timing of the seismic recording is provided by an accurate clock, which also resides inside the sphere. After a seismic study on the seafloor is complete, the instrument is brought back to the sea surface using an acoustic release mechanism. UTIG has long been involved in marine seismology. The development of a UTIG OBS instrument program began in 1978.

Paleomagnetic LabPaleomagnetic Lab
There are several aspects to our laboratory that make it different from others. One is our automatic handler system created at California Institute of Technology and adapted for our needs. Scientists and students can keep up with changes to our system by keeping in touch with the other 6 similar systems in the world and RAPID Consortium at http://rapid.gps.caltech.edu/. It also includes a cryogenic magnetometer and portable magnetic susceptibility meter (TerraPlus KT-10 Plus).

Petrographic Microscopes
Micro-scale imaging of rocks using directly observed visible light. Equipment: Low-power stereo microscopes, high resolution low-magnification scanned imaging, transmitted and reflected cross-polarized microscopy, high resolution 3D light microscopy (Edge R400) UV-stimulated fluorescence microscopy, microscope-mounted CL Photomicrography systems for all of these methods, both digital (Polaroid DMC) and conventional film.

Portable High-Resolution Multichannel Seismic System (MCS)Portable High-Resolution Multichannel Seismic System (MCS)
UTIG owns and maintains elements of a self-contained, portable, high resolution multichannel seismic (MCS) system that has been used over the past several years in salt- and fresh-water depths from ~4m to over 1km, on vessels from 10m to 35m in length. The 24-channel system is designed to be transported worldwide and to be installed on vessels of opportunity. Survey design, navigation, data acquisition, and near real-time MCS processing can be performed on non-dedicated laptops in the field. Deployment and recovery of gear is done by hand, requiring as few as 3 persons. The only constraints on the system are weight limits of the vessel and electrical requirements of the dedicated air compressors. For platforms with insufficient electrical capabilities, a fuel-powered generator or air compressor can be rented as a substitute.

Quadrupole ICP Mass Spectrometer
The Quadrupole ICP-MS laboratory (with laser ablation) is used for elemental determinations in a wide range of liquid (e.g., natural waters, dissolved sediments/rocks, digested biomass) and solid (e.g., rocks, minerals, glasses) samples. The ICP-MS instrument is an Agilent 7500ce, capable of measuring trace element concentrations in solution over a nine-order linear dynamic range, from ppt to 100s of ppm. Sample introduction systems include a Micromist concentric nebulizer with a Peltier-cooled spray chamber for aspirating solutions, and a New-Wave UP¨193-FX 193 nm excimer laser ablation system for micro-sampling of solids. Sub-ppm detection limits are obtained routinely by laser ablation. The Agilent 7500ce is equipped with a collision/reaction cell, allowing for quantification of environmentally important matrix/plasma-sensitive elements such as As, Se, and Fe. The instrument is housed in a positive-pressure HEPA-filtered laboratory equipped with a weighing station, laminar flow bench, and Type 1 (18.2 M?) ultrapure water station.

Scanning Electron Microscope Lab (DGS)Scanning Electron Microscope Lab (DGS)
Installed in 2008, this is a high-performance, 30 kV tungsten gun scanning electron microscope with a high resolution of 3.0 nm. The low vacuum mode allows for observation of specimens which cannot be viewed at high vacuum due to a non-conductive surface. This SEM has three detector systems - secondary electron (SE), backscattered electron (BSE), and X-ray EDS detectors.

Structure LabStructure Lab
The structural geology lab is where rocks are processed for structural geology and tectonics research. Storage space and all necessary equipment are available for preparing slabs, thin sections, and mineral separation for geochronology.

Sub-Bottom Profiling SystemsSub-Bottom Profiling Systems
UTIG owns and maintains an integrated sonar system for use in conducting Compressed High Intensity Radar Pulse (CHIRP) subbottom profiling of the upper sediment layers of the ocean bottom or various fresh water systems. The 3200-XS system was purchased in 2007 from Edgetech Corp. of West Wareham, MA (see www.edgetech.com) and can be deployed in water depths from ~2 m to >300 m with an optimum towing height of 3-5 m above seafloor. Deployment and recovery of the towfish can be done by shipboard winches for shallower deployments or a larger UTIG-owned Electro-Hydraulic winch. Constraints on vessel size are dependent on shipboard winches capability of handling either the large (190kg SB-512i) or small (76 kg SB-216S) towfish. Power control, navigation, video display, data acquisition and data storage are all performed by one topside processing unit. The system can be powered by 18-36 VDC or 110/240 VAC (auto-ranging). The system is presently comprised of: 3200-XS topside computer processor, 4-transducer SB-512i towfish, 1-transducer SB-216s towfish, electro-hydraulic winch with 500 m of armored tow cable, 3 shallow water tow cables of 10, 25, and 50 m length, GPS navigation system.

Superconducting Gravimeter LabSuperconducting Gravimeter Lab
A GWR superconducting gravimeter (precision ~0.01 micrGals) configured to be transportable, used in hydrologic and other studies. This is usually deployed in the field for campaigns of months and longer.

Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) LabThermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) Lab
Measures the isotopic compositions and elemental concentrations of Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, Lu-Hf, U-Th-Pb, Li, B, Mg, K, Zr, and REE. Equipment: Seven-collector Finnigan-MAT 261 thermal ionization mass spectrometer (1987) A single-channel ion-counting systems.

U-Pb Geochronology Clean Labs
Within the Department of Geological Sciences there are three clean-room laboratories supplied with HEPA-filtered class 100 air where sample preparation and ion-exchange chromatography for isotopic analysis may be done under ultra-clean conditions, making possible very low analytical blanks (e.g., < 1 pg Pb for U-Pb geochronology, and <10 pg Sr). There are also two other laboratories with HEPA-filtered work stations where sample preparation and ion-exchange chromatography are performed. These labs are supported by the departmental sample preparation facility, which includes shatterboxes for sample pulverization, and a crusher, a disc mill pulverizer, a Rogers table, a Wilfly table, a mica table, sieves, heavy liquids and Franz magnetic separators for mineral separation.

Volcanology LabVolcanology Lab
This lab is equipped with a Spectrex PC-2200 Laser Particle Counter and several sets of 8" brass mesh sieves to analyze volcanic particles in sizes from centimeters down to 1 micrometer for determining size distributions of volcanic tephra deposits and their componentry.

Walter Geology LibraryWalter Geology Library
The primary research collections of the library presently include more than 100,000 book and journal volumes and 46,000 geologic maps, among them the publications of the U.S. Geological Survey, most state geological surveys, and those of many foreign countries. Regional emphasis of the collection is on the Southwestern United States, Texas, and Mexico. The Institute and Bureau also have extensive libraries related to their specific research areas.

Center for Computational Geosciences & Optimization
The Center for Computational Geosciences and Optimization addresses modeling of the solid and fluid earth systems, with emphasis on large scale simulation and inversion on supercomputers. Problems of interest include forward and inverse modeling of regional and global seismic wave propagation, mantle convection, atmospheric and subsurface contaminant transport, ocean dynamics, and flow in porous media. Research in the CCGO is conducted jointly with collaborators from the Jackson School of Geosciences, other ICES centers, the College of Engineering, the Department of Computer Sciences, other universities including Carnegie Mellon, Penn, MIT, Columbia, and Emory, and Sandia National Labs. Related inverse and optimization problems in the mechanical and biomedical engineering sciences are also being pursued.
Applied Geodynamics Laboratory
The Applied Geodynamics Laboratory (AGL) is dedicated to producing innovative new concepts in salt tectonics. This research comprises a mix of physical and mathematical modeling and seismic-based mapping and structural-stratigraphic analysis of some of the world's most spectacular salt basins.
Fracture Research and Application Consortium
The Fracture Research and Application Consortium (FRAC) is an alliance of scientists from the Bureau and the departments of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering and Geological Sciences that seeks fundamental understanding of fractures and fracture processes dedicated to conquering the challenges of reservoir fractures.
High-Resolution X-ray Computed Tomography Facility
The High-Resolution X-ray Computed Tomography Facility at The University of Texas at Austin (UTCT) is a national shared multi-user facility supported by the Instrumentation and Facilities Program of NSF's Earth Sciences (EAR) directorate. UTCT offers scientific researchers across the earth, biological and engineering sciences access to a completely nondestructive technique for visualizing features in the interior of opaque solid objects, and for obtaining digital information on their 3D geometries and properties.
Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation
The George E. Brown, Jr. Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (NEES) is a national, networked, simulation resource that includes geographically-distributed, shared-use, next-generation experimental research Equipment Sites built and operated to advance earthquake engineering research and education through collaborative and integrated experimentation, theory, data archiving, and model-based simulation. The goal of NEES is to accelerate progress in earthquake engineering research and to improve the seismic design and performance of civil and mechanical infrastructure systems through the integration of people, ideas, and tools in a collaboratory environment. Open access to and use of NEES research facilities and data by all elements of the earthquake engineering community, including researchers, educators, students, practitioners, and information technology experts, is a key element of this goal.
PLATES
A program of research into plate tectonics and geologic reconstructions, the PLATES Project is supported by an industry consortium. Our primary objectives are to model past and present plate movement, compile comprehensive databases, develop plate motion computer software and apply plate motion models.
Structural Diagenesis Initiative
Structural diagenesis is a new perspective on interaction of mechanical and chemical processes at high crustal levels in the Earth. SDI promotes the growth of this new discipline.
Texas Consortium for Computational Seismology
The mission of the Texas Consortium for Computational Seismology is to address the most important and challenging research problems in computational geophysics as experienced by the energy industry while educating the next generation of research geophysicists and computational scientists.

Collecting depth profiles at the Poza Verde Posted by Marcus Gary

Photos of research of the Sistema Zacaton karst area

Collecting depth profiles at the Poza VerdeStaging for a dive at CaracolDEPTHX being lowered into El Zacaton.Sheck Exley and Jim Bowden after discovering Zacaton was deep.Camping area at La Pilita.Deploying a decompression system for dive exploration.Aerial view of El Zacaton (left) and the resurgence of Nacimiento.Poza Verde with the Miocene granitic peak of Granadillas in the background.Floating islands are called El ZacatonEl Zacaton