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Interviews

Interviews

  Start: October 1, 2014     End: October 1, 2014
 Location:See GeoSource for details
 Contact:Maurine Riess, mriess@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-7673
ExxonMobil
Hess Corporation

12:00 pm - iPGST Seminar: Andreas Kronenberg, Texas A&M University

iPGST Seminar: Andreas Kronenberg, Texas A&M University

  Start: October 1, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: October 1, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Nikki Seymour, nikki.m.seymour@utexas.edu

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Info Sessions

Info Sessions

  Start: October 2, 2014     End: October 2, 2014
 Location:JGB 2.218
 Contact:Maurine Riess, mriess@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-7673
Apache 5:15 PM
PetroTel 6:30 PM

Interviews

Interviews

  Start: October 2, 2014     End: October 2, 2014
 Location:See GeoSource for details
 Contact:Maurine Riess, mriess@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-7673
Hess Corporation

4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Andreas Kronenberg

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Andreas Kronenberg

  Start: October 2, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: October 2, 2014 at 5:00 pm

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Interviews

Interviews

  Start: October 3, 2014     End: October 3, 2014
 Location:See GeoSource for details
 Contact:Maurine Riess, mriess@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-7673
Apache
PetroTel

10:30 am - Mrinal Sen, UTIG

Mrinal Sen, UTIG

  Start: October 3, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: October 3, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Nick Hayman, hayman@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-7721
"Pushing the Limits of Seismic Resolution"

Abstract:

Seismic resolution is dictated by the frequency and seismic wave velocity. The seismic waves see the reservoir in their entirety albeit at a very low resolution. Typically vertical resolution of seismic waves is defined to be one quarter of the wavelength based on travel time. Beyond this, one has to make use of amplitude information. In the recent past, several attempts have been made to increase the resolution that can be achieved by seismic data. Several new field geometries have been implemented that include wide azimuth, multi-azimuth and wide angle surveys. These have resulted in the development of new processing tools for seismic data analysis. I will review three primary developments, namely, full waveform inversion (FWI), basis pursuit inversion (BPI) and seismic fracture characterization. Unlike conventional velocity analysis tools such as tomography, FWI makes use of the complete wavefield data resulting in a much improved imaging. The BPI imposes a wedge-dictionary constraint in time-domain deconvolution to decipher thin layers that are below seismic resolution. Seismic fracture characterization uses rich azimuth data to estimate spatial maps of fracture density and fracture directions.

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Interviews

Interviews

  Start: October 6, 2014     End: October 6, 2014
 Location:See GeoSource for details
 Contact:Maurine Riess, mriess@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-7673
ExxonMobil Data Management
PetroTel

9:00 am - Career Center Open House

Career Center Open House

  Start: October 6, 2014 at 9:00 am     End: October 6, 2014 at 12:00 pm
 Location:JGB 2.112
 Contact:Chelsea Ochoa, chelsea.ochoa@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-0893
Come by for Bagels and Coffee
9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. while they last!
JSG Students only

12:00 pm - Soft Rock Seminar: MacKenzie Day

Soft Rock Seminar: MacKenzie Day

  Start: October 6, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: October 6, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Kealie Goodwin, kealiegoodwin@utexas.edu

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Interviews

Interviews

  Start: October 7, 2014     End: October 7, 2014
 Location:See GeoSource for details
 Contact:Maurine Riess, mriess@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-7673
Shell

4:00 pm - Environmental Careers Panel

Environmental Careers Panel

  Start: October 7, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: October 7, 2014 at 5:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Chelsea Ochoa, chelsea.ochoa@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-0893
Learn from professionals and alumni working as environmental geoscientists. Panelists include representatives from environmental consulting firms and local government.

4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Naresh Neupane

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Naresh Neupane

  Start: October 7, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: October 7, 2014 at 5:00 pm

5:15 pm - Info Session

Info Session

  Start: October 7, 2014 at 5:15 pm     End: October 7, 2014 at 6:15 pm
 Location:JGB 2.218
 Contact:Maurine Riess, mriess@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-7673
Talisman Energy
5:15 PM
JGB 2.218

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Info Sessions

Info Sessions

  Start: October 8, 2014     End: October 8, 2014
 Location:JGB 2.218
 Contact:Maurine Riess, mriess@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-7673
Peregrine Petroleum 5:15 PM

Interviews

Interviews

  Start: October 8, 2014     End: October 8, 2014
 Location:See GeoSource for details
 Contact:Maurine Riess, mriess@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-7673
Shell
Talisman Energy

12:00 pm - iPGST Seminar: Ruohan Gao

iPGST Seminar: Ruohan Gao

  Start: October 8, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: October 8, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Nikki Seymour, nikki.m.seymour@utexas.edu

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Interviews

Interviews

  Start: October 9, 2014     End: October 9, 2014
 Location:See GeoSource for details
 Contact:Maurine Riess, mriess@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-7673
Peregrine Petroleum
EP Energy

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10:30 am - UTIG Seminar Series: Cyril Grima, UTIG

UTIG Seminar Series: Cyril Grima, UTIG

  Start: October 10, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: October 10, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Joe MacGregor, joemac@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0411
 URL:Event Link
"Leveraging Radar Sounding with Surface Reconnaissance: From Antarctic Science to Planetary Landing Sites"

Abstract:

Radar sounders are active remote sensing instruments whose signal can penetrate through the ground down to several kilometers in icy environments. While the radar plateform is moving horizontally, the recording of radio reflections from buried geophysical interfaces does provide a vertical cross-section (i.e. radargram) of the subsurface structure and geometry. Radar sounders are deployed on airborne plateforms over terrestrial polar terrains and planetary spacecrafts orbiting the Moon and Mars. UTIG is the prime investigator of a radar concept for the exploration of the jovian moon Europa to search for its hidden subsurface ocean.

However, while the radar sounders are commonly used for their capability to retrieve the geometry of subsurface geologic structures, the amount of power reflected by the surface also contains precious informations on its roughness and composition. I will present a reflectometry technique, the Radar Statistical Reconnaissance (RSR), that has been matured over the last two years at UTIG to extract these properties from the surface echo.

Some applications in Antarctica with the UTIG's High Capability Radar Sounder (HiCARS) demonstrate the RSR capabilities in terms of surface composition assessment, roughness inversion, and near-surface liquid phase detection. The RSR is especially robust in deriving the surface snow density over large regions, promising to increase the accuracy of the Antarctic surface mass balance (SMB) models. Surface density is a measurement of its cohesiveness and load-bearing capabilities, while roughness is a proxy for blocks distribution and sizes. Those two properties are crucial in assessing the safety of potential landing sites for planetary crafts. I will show how the RSR can contribute in a near-future to the selection of Martian landing sites for the NASA's Insight Lander and the 2020 Mars rover. These capabilities can be extended to site reconnaissance on Europa that is a NASA's programmatic goal for a follow-on lander.



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12:00 pm - Soft Rock Seminar: Michael Toomey

Soft Rock Seminar: Michael Toomey

  Start: October 13, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: October 13, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Kealie Goodwin, kealiegoodwin@utexas.edu

6:30 pm - Info Session

Info Session

  Start: October 13, 2014 at 6:30 pm     End: October 13, 2014 at 8:00 pm
 Location:ECJ 1.204
 Contact:Chelsea Ochoa, chelsea.ochoa@jsg.utexas.edu, 5122320893
URS Corporation
6:30 PM
ECJ 1.204

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4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Jonathan Laronne

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Jonathan Laronne

  Start: October 14, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: October 14, 2014 at 5:00 pm

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12:00 pm - iPGST Seminar: Peter Gold

iPGST Seminar: Peter Gold

  Start: October 15, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: October 15, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Nikki Seymour, nikki.m.seymour@utexas.edu

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11:30 am - Total Recruiting Event

Total Recruiting Event

  Start: October 16, 2014 at 11:30 am     End: October 16, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:San Jacinto Residence Hall: Multipurpose Room 207B
 Contact:Chelsea Ochoa , chelsea.ochoa@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-0893
Geoscience students: You are invited!

Come and meet Total HQ and Houston-based staff and discover Total's activities worldwide. The presentations will be followed by a networking event. Snacks will be provided.

San Jacinto Residence Hall
Multipurpose Room 207B

Total: A global force in the oil, gas, chemical and new energy industries- recruits 10,000 people each year. Why not you? Total is 100,000 employees in 130 countries.

www.careers.total.com

4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Russell Carter

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Russell Carter

  Start: October 16, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: October 16, 2014 at 5:00 pm

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10:30 am - UTIG Seminar Series: Jay Pulliam, Baylor University

UTIG Seminar Series: Jay Pulliam, Baylor University

  Start: October 17, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: October 17, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Harm Van Avendonk, harm@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0429
 URL:Event Link
"Lithospheric Modification at the Southern Edge of Laurentia Revealed by Broadband Seismology"

Abstract:

The southern margin of Laurentia has been modified by a wide range of tectonic processes, including deformation due to repeated orogenies and continental collisions (i.e. Llano, Ancestral Rockies, Ouachita, Laramide) as well as ongoing rifting (at the Rio Grande Rift) and completed rifting (which created the Gulf of Mexico, GoM). Artifacts of these processes are likely to remain at lithospheric depths beneath the region but, until recently, the tools needed to examine the 2D and 3D structures at mantle depths were not available. With the passage of the EarthScope’s USArray stations and two targeted broadband deployments, new images of the region’s lithosphere have emerged. These images reveal lithospheric-scale anomalies that correlate strongly with surface features such as a large fast anomaly that corresponds to the southern extent of the Laurentia (or “Great Plains”) craton and a large slow anomaly associated with the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen. Other features were unanticipated, including slow shear velocities beneath the Texas-GoM margin, a layer that is bounded at its top and bottom by seismic discontinuities, and high levels of seismic anisotropy.

Lithospheric thinning associated with the Rio Grande Rift appears to be propagating eastward and eroding the Great Plains craton. A large, seismically fast anomaly imaged beneath west Texas and southeastern New Mexico has implications for the region’s structural evolution. The size, seismic velocity, and location of this anomaly suggests that it may be the result of a “step instability,” in which progressive deformation has locally removed mantle lithosphere beneath the eastern flank of the Rio Grande Rift, resulting in thickened lithosphere at the western edge of the Great Plains craton and uplift beneath the rift flank.


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12:00 pm - Soft Rock Seminar: Chenglin Gong

Soft Rock Seminar: Chenglin Gong

  Start: October 20, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: October 20, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Kealie Goodwin, kealiegoodwin@utexas.edu

6:00 pm - Alumni Networking Reception in conjunction with GSA

Alumni Networking Reception in conjunction with GSA

  Start: October 20, 2014 at 6:00 pm     End: October 20, 2014 at 8:00 pm
 Location:Mahony & Sons Burrard Landing
 Contact:Kristen Tucek, ktucek@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-775-6745

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4:00 pm - TBPG Talk

TBPG Talk

  Start: October 21, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: October 21, 2014 at 5:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Chelsea Ochoa, chelsea.ochoa@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-0893
 URL:Event Link
Did you know that you can become a licensed professional geologist in the future?

The Texas Board of Professional Geoscientists (TBPG) will be here on Tuesday, October 21st to talk about the Professional Geoscientist license and the Geoscientist-in-Training Program.

Why get licensed?
Who can get licensed?
What is the process?

Come find out! Tuesday, October 21st at 4 PM in JGB 3.222.

4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Bruce Frederick

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Bruce Frederick

  Start: October 21, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: October 21, 2014 at 5:00 pm

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4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Frieder Klein

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Frieder Klein

  Start: October 23, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: October 23, 2014 at 5:00 pm

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10:30 am - UTIG Seminar Series: Dave Schneider, NCAR

UTIG Seminar Series: Dave Schneider, NCAR

  Start: October 24, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: October 24, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Yuko Okumura, Yukoo@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0383
 URL:Event Link
“Understanding Antarctic climate change in the context of global warming”

Abstract:

The Antarctic Ice Sheet and circumpolar Southern Ocean play unique roles in the climate system, strongly regulating the distribution of energy. The Antarctic Ice Sheet surface reflects 80% or more of the solar radiation it receives in the summer, and in winter it emits to space much of the heat received from lower latitudes. The Southern Ocean accounts for an estimated 40% of the global oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon, and absorbs excess heat from greenhouse gasses. However, predicting the role and response of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean in global climate change has proven very challenging, due in part to the complex nature of atmosphere-ocean-ice sheet interactions and in part due to sparse observations. For example, there is no agreed-upon explanation for the modest increase in Antarctic sea ice extent since 1979, and differing interpretations on the roles of stratospheric ozone depletion and tropical sea surface temperatures in the strengthening of the westerly winds over the Southern Ocean. Furthermore, our work has shown that sea ice has increased amidst cooling Southern Ocean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and cooling or unchanging coastal East Antarctic air temperatures. These trends are remarkable against the backdrop of global warming, and this talk will interpret the roles of natural variability as well forcing by ozone depletion and tropical SSTs in driving these trends. We will use traditional climate observations as well as ice core proxies to characterize natural variability, and a series of atmospheric model simulations to investigate the causes of recent trends, with a focus on the wind trends.


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12:00 pm - Soft Rock Seminar: Kim Miller

Soft Rock Seminar: Kim Miller

  Start: October 27, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: October 27, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Kealie Goodwin, kealiegoodwin@utexas.edu

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4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Anna Svartman, Kevin Befus

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Anna Svartman, Kevin Befus

  Start: October 28, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: October 28, 2014 at 5:00 pm

6:00 pm - Alumni Networking Reception in conjunction with SEG

Alumni Networking Reception in conjunction with SEG

  Start: October 28, 2014 at 6:00 pm     End: October 28, 2014 at 8:00 pm
 Location:Bubba Gump Shrimp Co., Denver CO
 Contact:Kristen Tucek, ktucek@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-775-6745

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12:00 pm - iPGST Seminar: Harm van Avendonk

iPGST Seminar: Harm van Avendonk

  Start: October 29, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: October 29, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Nikki Seymour, nikki.m.seymour@utexas.edu

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4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Jessica Warren

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Jessica Warren

  Start: October 30, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: October 30, 2014 at 5:00 pm

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9:00 am - BEG Friday Seminar Series

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: October 31, 2014 at 9:00 am     End: October 31, 2014 at 10:00 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
Venkat Lakshmi
Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences
University of South Carolina

Studies of the land surface hydrological cycle using
modeling, observations and remote sensing

Abstract:
Land surface hydrology is comprised of complex processes. Precipitation is partitioned into infiltration and runoff depending on antecedent soil moisture conditions, the properties of the soil and its abilities to conduct water away from the surface, the slope of the land surface and the amount of atmospheric demand for evapotranspiration.The observed solar radiation and the computed downward longwave radiation drive the energy budget and evapotranspiration. However in reality the spatial variability both the land surface properties (soil and vegetation) as well as the meteorological inputs (precipitation and radiation) are not accurately known. This incurs errors in the computer simulations of water and energy budgets. Satellite remote sensing has broad spatial view of the land surface and is able to average the heterogeneities and provide data for use in hydrology such as soil moisture, surface temperature and vegetation density.

In the first part of my talk, I will use an established land surface model (Variable Infiltration Capacity) to study the simulations of the vertical profile of the land surface soil moisture and the surface temperature on a 1/8 degree grid in the Upper Mississippi River Basin over a period of 50 years from 1950-1999 on a daily time step. I have used vegetation densities from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument. The hydrological balance is checked with the observed stream flows at the various gauging stations and the distributed model response of surface temperature is compared to the surface temperature derived from the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS).

In the second part of my talk I will use an innovative change detection algorithm based on active radar observations to downscale soil moisture obtained by a lower resolution passive radiometer. In hydrological studies dealing with catchment hydrology we require high resolution data sets and satellite remote sensing is unable to provide these data sets. Therefore combining information from satellite sensors will help us to achieve our targets. I will use data from the Soil Moisture Experiment 2002 (SMEX02) held in Ames Iowa and SMAPVEX12 held in Manitoba Canada to demonstrate this approach.

10:30 am - UTIG Seminar Series: Rodrigo Fernandez-Vasquez, UTIG

UTIG Seminar Series: Rodrigo Fernandez-Vasquez, UTIG

  Start: October 31, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: October 31, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Sean Gulick, sean@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0483
 URL:Event Link
"Deglaciation of Marine Environments, Lessons and Questions from Patagonia and the Antarctic Peninsula"

Abstract:

Retreat of marine ice bodies from continental shelves and fjords is a complex process where internal ice dynamics is affected by atmospheric, oceanic and geological factors. During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) ice extended to the edge of the continental shelf in the Antarctic Peninsula (AP). The maximum western extent of what constituted the second largest ice body in the southern hemisphere, the Patagonian Ice Sheet (PIS; or Patagonian Ice Cap for some) is still unknown although partial evidence suggest that it might have reached the shelf break in some areas while others might have terminated on land. Geographic proximity, coupling of ocean and atmospheric systems, and some glacial history evidence suggest a certain level of connection between the ice sheets of Patagonia and the AP at least during the last few thousand years before the deglaciation of the continental shelf.

Variable levels of detail exist about the history of deglaciation along the western Antarctic Peninsula. About three decades of marine surveys have resulted on the collection of large amounts of bathymetric and multibeam data, and of hundreds of sediment cores. Today, there is a good understanding of sea floor geomorphological features related to ice retreat dynamics but age control of these features or post glacial sediments is still a methodological challenge. On the other hand, the knowledge of the deglaciation history of the Patagonian continental shelf and fjords is restricted to a handful of fjords with virtually nothing known about the continental shelf.

I will present results of seismic data, sediment cores and bathymetry collected over several cruises, along with results of well cited publications to provide an overview of what is known and what we still need to understand respect to the deglaciation of these regions. I will discuss the possible meaning of early post-glacial sedimentary facies and mechanisms acting during initial grounding line retreat, including the role of sediment flux to the ice/bed interface, the influence of climate and ocean changes and sea level rise. I will also introduce research ideas included in submitted and in-preparation proposals that will drive my research over the next years.

  
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