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12:00 pm - Soft Rock Seminar: Jasmine Mason

Soft Rock Seminar: Jasmine Mason

  Start: November 3, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: November 3, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Kealie Goodwin, kealiegoodwin@utexas.edu

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4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Lauren Andrews, Peter Zamora

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Lauren Andrews, Peter Zamora

  Start: November 4, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: November 4, 2014 at 5:00 pm

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12:00 pm - iPGST Seminar: Rudra Chatterjee

iPGST Seminar: Rudra Chatterjee

  Start: November 5, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: November 5, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Nikki Seymour, nikki.m.seymour@utexas.edu

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4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Rowan Martindale

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Rowan Martindale

  Start: November 6, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: November 6, 2014 at 5:00 pm

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9:00 am - BEG Friday Seminar Series

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: November 7, 2014 at 9:00 am     End: November 7, 2014 at 10:00 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
Kutalmis Saylam
Lidar and Remote Sensing Specialist, BEG

Determining wetlands distribution, lake depths and volumes, and topography using airborne lidar and imagery on the North Slope, Deadhorse area, Alaska: field campaign and preliminary bathymetric results

10:30 am - UTIG Seminar Series: Peter Clift, Lousiana State University

UTIG Seminar Series: Peter Clift, Lousiana State University

  Start: November 7, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: November 7, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Kirk McIntosh, kirk@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0480
 URL:Event Link
"The Asian Monsoon and Its links to Cenozoic Orogenesis"

Abstract:

The Asian monsoon represents the most dramatic proposed example of how the solid Earth may cause changes in atmospheric and oceanic circulation and trigger climate change on a regional or even global scale. It has been suggested for several years now that rising of the Tibetan Plateau has caused the monsoon to strengthen around 8 Ma yet modeling also highlights the potential importance of the Himalayan barrier and the retreat of shallow seas from central Asia in shaping regional climate. Theoretical models also suggest that a strong monsoon would drive rapid exhumation in the Himalaya. However, this does not correlate with the 8 Ma climate event because exhumation is known to have started by around 23 Ma, although formation of the Lesser Himalayan duplex is known to have started in the Late Miocene. Are models or observations at fault? It is noteworthy that the best 8 Ma monsoon proxies are driven by wind and upwelling, not rainfall or run-off making their interpretation more complex than was first believed. Recent investigations of cores for seawater salinity and for chemical weathering intensity from the South China Sea now suggest that 8 Ma was a time of regional drying and that monsoon intensification likely happened around the start of the Miocene ~24 Ma. This change is broadly in line with ODP data from the Bay of Bengal and from industrial and DSDP boreholes in the Arabian Sea. In this scenario, rising of the plateau following the start of India-Asia collision at ~50 Ma caused the monsoon to strengthen after it reached a critical threshold at approximately half its present size. The onset of stronger summer rains then caused faster focused erosion along the Himalaya front, allowing the Greater Himalaya to begin their exhumation and shedding large volumes of clastic material into the Indian Ocean, peaking around the time of the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum at 16 Ma. Scientific drilling in 2014 and 2015 now targets the period of initial monsoon intensification, which is poorly defined and these expeditions seek to demonstrate whether the monsoon operated in a relatively uniform fashion across Asia or whether there are major differences between south, southeast and eastern Asian marginal seas.



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Annual Tailgate Celebration

Annual Tailgate Celebration

  Start: November 8, 2014     End: November 8, 2014
 Location:Holland Family Student Center
 Contact:Kristen Tucek, ktucek@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-775-6745

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12:00 pm - Soft Rock Seminar: Anastasia Piliouras

Soft Rock Seminar: Anastasia Piliouras

  Start: November 10, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: November 10, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Kealie Goodwin, kealiegoodwin@utexas.edu

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4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Nicholas Perez, Lichun Wang

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Nicholas Perez, Lichun Wang

  Start: November 11, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: November 11, 2014 at 5:00 pm

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4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Andrew Smye

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Andrew Smye

  Start: November 13, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: November 13, 2014 at 5:00 pm

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9:00 am - BEG Friday Seminar Series

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: November 14, 2014 at 9:00 am     End: November 14, 2014 at 10:00 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
Brian A. Smith, PhD, PG
Aquifer Science Team Leader
Barton Springs/Edwards Aquifer Conservation District

Hydrologic Influences of the Blanco River on the
Trinity and Edwards Aquifers, Central Texas

Abstract:
The Blanco River of central Texas provides an important hydrologic link between surface and groundwater as it traverses two major karst aquifer systems—the Trinity and Edwards Aquifers. The Blanco River is characterized by alternating gaining and losing stretches due to the presence of springs that discharge water into the river and swallets that drain water from the river. Trinity units outcrop in the western part of the study area, and Edwards units outcrop in the eastern part of the study area. Normal faulting along the Balcones Fault Zone has juxtaposed the older, underlying Trinity units against the Edwards units. The region consists primarily of Cretaceous limestone, dolomite, and marls. One of the more significant springs along the Blanco River is Pleasant Valley Spring. During below-average flow conditions, Pleasant Valley Spring becomes the headwaters of the Blanco River even though the headwaters, under wet conditions, are about 50 km upstream. Water that enters the Edwards Aquifer from the Blanco River can eventually discharge at both San Marcos Springs to the south and Barton Springs to the north. Tracer tests have confirmed flow to both springs under drought conditions. During periods of extreme drought, when other recharging streams are dry, the Blanco River can provide enough water to the Edwards Aquifer that will help maintain flow at Barton Springs. Some of the water recharging the Trinity Aquifer enters a deep flow system that has been penetrated by monitor and water-supply well at depths of about 400 m on the east side of the study area. In this area, low-permeability units of the Upper Trinity provide hydraulic separation between the water-bearing Middle Trinity and the overlying Edwards. Potentiometric and geochemical data suggest that water encountered in these deep Middle Trinity units comes from recharge areas along the Blanco River where the units are exposed at the surface. In the western part of the study area increasing rates of pumping from the Trinity Aquifer are reducing heads in the aquifer and are subsequently reducing springflows (such as from Jacob's Well and Pleasant Valley Spring) that sustain the Blanco River. Decreasing flow in the Blanco River can lead to less recharge to the Edwards Aquifer and less discharge from San Marcos and Barton Springs. A better understanding of these aquifer systems and how they are influenced by the Blanco River is important for management of groundwater in an area undergoing significant population growth.

10:30 am - UTIG Seminar Series: Aaron Wech, U.S. Geological Survey

UTIG Seminar Series: Aaron Wech, U.S. Geological Survey

  Start: November 14, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: November 14, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Laura Wallace, lwallace@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0324
 URL:Event Link
"Using Messy Seismicity to Investigate Earthquakes and Plate Boundary Dynamic"

Abstract:

Tectonic tremor, a messy seismic signal characterized by enduring 1-10 Hz signals, is observed beneath the locked zone of many faults. In subduction zones, it is often accompanied by slow slip, an intermediate mechanism for accommodating plate motion between a megathrust rupture and stable sliding. While it is evident these phenomena play a critical role in relieving stress on the plate interface, the nature of these signals makes tracking them difficult, however, and a clear understanding of the processes controlling their behavior remains elusive. Here I’ll try and make the case that tracking this behavior is both interesting and important by presenting an overview of we do and don’t know, how it relates to hazards, and what it means for the physics of earthquakes and plate boundary dynamics.

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12:00 pm - Soft Rock Seminar: Kelsi Ustipak

Soft Rock Seminar: Kelsi Ustipak

  Start: November 17, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: November 17, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Kealie Goodwin, kealiegoodwin@utexas.edu

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4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Jin Liu, Travis Swanson

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Jin Liu, Travis Swanson

  Start: November 18, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: November 18, 2014 at 5:00 pm

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12:00 pm - iPGST Seminar: Jean Cline, UNLV

iPGST Seminar: Jean Cline, UNLV

  Start: November 19, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: November 19, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Nikki Seymour, nikki.m.seymour@utexas.edu

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4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Jean Cline

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Jean Cline

  Start: November 20, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: November 20, 2014 at 5:00 pm

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9:00 am - BEG Friday Seminar Series

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: November 21, 2014 at 9:00 am     End: November 21, 2014 at 10:00 pm
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
***NO STREAMING VIDEO OF THIS TALK***

Andrew Duncan
Senior Geoscience Advisor, Reservoir Development Services
Baker Hughes

Borehole Imaging at Baker Hughes

Abstract:
Borehole Imaging was an evolutionary step-change from the dipmeter technology of the 80s and early 90s. It is around 20 years since Baker Hughes launched their first wireline borehole imagers, and from that time there have been multiple advances in imaging technology. Imaging tools are now routinely employed in both water and oil-based mud systems, on wireline and on LWD. Most major and independent oil and gas operators are aware of the basic capabilities of these tools, but not all have a complete understanding of the range of interpretation possibilities they provide. This overview will discuss the principal tool types available in industry and touch on how such tools can help us to gain invaluable information from the subsurface.

10:30 am - UTIG Seminar Series: Onno Oncken, Freie Universität Berlin

UTIG Seminar Series: Onno Oncken, Freie Universität Berlin

  Start: November 21, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: November 21, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Nick Hayman, hayman@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-7721
 URL:Event Link
"Locking, Mass Flux and Topographic Response at Plate Boundaries – The Chilean Case"

Abstract:

On the long term, convergent plate boundaries have been shown to be controlled by either accretion/underplating or by subduction erosion. Vertical surface motion is coupled to convergence rate - typically with an uplift rate of the coastal area ranging from 0 to +50% of convergence rate in accretive systems, and -20 to +30% in erosive systems. Vertical kinematics, however, are not necessarily linked to horizontal strain mode, i.e. upper plate shortening or extension, in a simple way. This range of kinematic behaviors - as well as their acceleration where forearcs collide with oceanic ridges/plateau - is well expressed along the Chilean plate margin.

Towards the short end of the time scale, we here find that fault motion as well as vertical motion may exhibit reversal of motion from the preseismic to the postseismic stage, and may show extensional as well as compressional deformation to temporally coexist next to each other. This complexity is suggested to be chiefly controlled by seismic cycle related forearc bending and unbending causing fault triggering in the upper plate, a mechanism unique to forearcs. In addition, the short term deformation time end appears to exhibit a close correlation with the frictional properties and geodetic locking at the plate interface. Corroborating analogue experiments of strain accumulation during multiple earthquake cycles, forearc deformation and uplift focus above the downdip and updip end of seismic coupling and slip and are each related to a particular stage of the seismic cycle, but with opposite trends for both domains. Similarly, barriers separating locked domains along strike appear to accumulate most upper plate faulting interseismically. Hence, locking patters are reflected in topography. From the long-term memory contained in the forearc topography the relief of the Chilean forearc seems to reflect long term stability of the observed heterogeneity of locking at the plate interface. Finally, the nature of locking at the plate interface controlling the above kinematic behavior appears to be strongly controlled by the degree of fluid overpressuring at the plate interface suggesting that the hydraulic system at the interface takes a key role for forearc response.

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12:00 pm - Soft Rock Seminar: Rattanaporn Fong-Ngern

Soft Rock Seminar: Rattanaporn Fong-Ngern

  Start: November 24, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: November 24, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Kealie Goodwin, kealiegoodwin@utexas.edu

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4:00 pm - Master's Thesis Day

Master's Thesis Day

  Start: November 25, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: November 25, 2014 at 7:00 pm
Part of Tech Sessions Speaker Series.

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Legend
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