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5:00 pm - Sandia Laboratory Info Session

Sandia Laboratory Info Session

  Start: February 1, 2016 at 5:00 pm     End: February 1, 2016 at 6:00 pm
 Location:JGB 4.102 Barrow Conference Room
 Contact:Maurine Riess, mriess@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-7673
Dr. Nedra Bonal, Jackson School of Geosciences alumnus, will be here to discuss job and internship opportunities at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM.

http://www.sandia.gov/careers/index.html

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9:00 am - Sandia Laboratory Info Session

Sandia Laboratory Info Session

  Start: February 2, 2016 at 9:00 am     End: February 2, 2016 at 10:00 am
 Location:ROC 2.201 Conference Room (Pickle Research Campus)
 Contact:Maurine Riess, mriess@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-7673
Dr. Nedra Bonal, Jackson School of Geosciences alumnus, will be here to discuss job and internship opportunities at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM.

http://www.sandia.gov/careers/index.html

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4:00 am - De Ford Lecture Series: Charlie Kerans

De Ford Lecture Series: Charlie Kerans

  Start: February 4, 2016 at 4:00 am     End: February 4, 2016 at 5:00 am

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10:30 am - UTIG Seminar Series: Joellen Russell, University of Arizona

UTIG Seminar Series: Joellen Russell, University of Arizona

  Start: February 5, 2016 at 10:30 am     End: February 5, 2016 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Pedro Di Nezio, pdn@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0389
 URL:Event Link
"The Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling (SOCCOM)"

Abstract:

Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling (SOCCOM) is a 6-year observational and modeling research project focused on the role of the Southern Ocean in the anthropogenic carbon budget, ocean biogeochemistry, and climate change. The operational goal of SOCCOM is to deploy nearly 200 Argo-compatible biogeochemically-sensored (BGC) profiling floats equipped with pH, oxygen, nitrate and bio-optical sensors throughout the Southern Ocean waters south of 30°S. These climate-ready BGC-floats are calibrated at the time of deployment by high accuracy biogeochemical measurements, and they operate year around, including in ice-covered waters. The data from the BGC-floats is being assimilated by a Southern Ocean State Estimate (SOSE) model that incorporates biogeochemical processes, and this gridded SOSE output is used to constrain high-resolution coupled atmosphere-ocean model simulations designed to both increase our understanding of Southern Ocean processes and to reduce the uncertainty of projections of the future trajectory of the Earth’s carbon, climate and biogeochemistry. Recent results of SOCCOM as well as the exciting next steps being developed will be presented.

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4:00 pm - De Ford Lecture Series: Yolanda Gil

De Ford Lecture Series: Yolanda Gil

  Start: February 11, 2016 at 4:00 pm     End: February 11, 2016 at 5:00 pm

5:00 pm - Alumni Reception during NAPE in Houston

Alumni Reception during NAPE in Houston

  Start: February 11, 2016 at 5:00 pm     End: February 11, 2016 at 7:00 pm
 Location:Hilton of the Americas in downtown Houston, Ballroom of the Americas B
 Contact:Kristen Tucek, ktucek@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-471-2223
Join fellow Longhorn alumni and friends of the Jackson School of Geosciences, Cockrell School of Engineering, and McCombs School of Business for a networking reception in Houston.

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10:30 am - UTIG Seminar Series: Sarah Penniston-Dorland, University of Maryland

UTIG Seminar Series: Sarah Penniston-Dorland, University of Maryland

  Start: February 12, 2016 at 10:30 am     End: February 12, 2016 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Laura Wallace, lwallace@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0324
 URL:Event Link
"Strength and Heat in the Subduction Channel: Evidence from Metamorphic Rocks and Geodynamic Models"

Abstract:

The thermal structure and flow of material within subduction zones are closely linked and are important for our understanding of seismicity within subduction zones and for the generation of arc magmas. This is a talk in two parts investigating evidence from metamorphic rocks for the thermal structure and degree of material flow within subduction zones. Evidence from natural rocks is compared to that generated from computational geodynamic models.

Part 1. Thermal structure: The maximum-pressure P-T conditions (Pmax-T) and prograde P-T paths of exhumed subduction-related metamorphic rocks are compared to predictions of P-T conditions from computational thermal models of subduction systems. While the range of proposed models encompasses most estimated Pmax-T conditions, models predict temperatures that are on average colder than those recorded by exhumed rocks. In general, discrepancies are greatest for Pmax< 2 GPa where only a few of the highest-T modeled paths overlap typical petrologic observations and model averages are 100-300 °C colder than average conditions recorded by rocks. Prograde P-T paths similarly indicate warmer subduction than typical models. Our compilation and comparison suggest that exhumed high-P rocks provide a more accurate constraint on P-T conditions within subduction zones, and that those conditions may closely represent the subduction geotherm. While exhumation processes in subduction zones require closer petrologic scrutiny, the next generation of models should more comprehensively incorporate all sources of heat. Subduction-zone thermal structures from currently available models do not match the rock record, and this mismatch has wide-reaching implications for our understanding of global geochemical cycles, the petrologic structure of subduction zones, and fluid-rock interactions and seismicity within subduction zones.

Part 2. The Catalina Schist contains a spectacular, km-scale amphibolite facies mélange zone, thought to be part of a Cretaceous convergent margin plate interface. In this setting, mafic and ultramafic blocks ranging from cms up to 100s of m in diameter are surrounded by finer-grained matrix. All blocks throughout the mélange contain assemblages consistent with upper amphibolite-facies conditions, suggesting a relatively restricted range of depths and temperatures over which the mélange formed. This apparent uniformity contrasts with other mélanges, such as the Franciscan Complex, where rocks with highly variable peak metamorphic grade suggest extensive mixing of materials along the subduction interface. This mixing has been ascribed to flow of material within relatively low viscosity matrix. The Zr content of rutiles in samples from the amphibolite facies of the Catalina Schist were measured to determine peak metamorphic temperatures, identify whether these temperatures were different among blocks (within measurement error), and whether the spatial distribution of temperatures throughout the mélange was systematic or random. Resolvably different Zr contents are found among the blocks, corresponding to different peak metamorphic temperatures of 650 to 730°C at an assumed pressure of 1 GPa. No systematic distribution of temperatures was found, however. Therefore material flow within the Catalina Schist mélange was likely chaotic, but appears to have occurred on a relatively restricted scale.

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4:00 pm - De Ford Lecture Series: Fiona Whitaker, University of Bristol (UK)

De Ford Lecture Series: Fiona Whitaker, University of Bristol (UK)

  Start: February 18, 2016 at 4:00 pm     End: February 18, 2016 at 5:00 pm

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4:00 pm - De Ford Lecture Series: G. Burch Fisher

De Ford Lecture Series: G. Burch Fisher

  Start: February 25, 2016 at 4:00 pm     End: February 25, 2016 at 5:00 pm

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10:30 am - UTIG Seminar Series: Diego Melgar, UC Berkeley

UTIG Seminar Series: Diego Melgar, UC Berkeley

  Start: February 26, 2016 at 10:30 am     End: February 26, 2016 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Adrian Arnulf, aarnulf@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0376
 URL:Event Link
"The 2015 Mw8.3 Illapel, Chile Earthquake: Along-dip Segmentation of Megathrust Properties and Lessons for Local Tsunami Warning"

Abstract:

The 2015 Mw8.3 Illapel, Chile earthquake is the latest megathrust event on the Chilean subduction zone. It generated strong ground motions and a large (up to 11m runup) tsunami which prompted the evacuation of more than 1 million people in the first hours following the event. Observations during recent earthquakes suggest that these phenomena can be associated with rupture on different parts of the megathrust. The deep portion generates strong shaking while slow, large slip on the shallow fault is responsible for the tsunami. It is unclear whether all megathrusts can have shallow slip during coseismic rupture and what physical properties regulate this. We resolve a kinematic slip model using regional geophysical observations and analyze it jointly with teleseismic back-projection. These observations show that the Illapel event ruptured both deep and shallow segments with substantial slip. We find that the shallow and deep portions of the megathrust are segmented and have fundamentally different behavior. We forward calculate local tsunami propagation from the resolved slip model and find good agreement with field measurements, independently validating the slip model.

Large earthquakes are of fundamentals scientific interest, they illuminate the properties of megathrusts. However, they also have substantial impacts on societies, and many of the tools used for studying them can be applied to hazards mitigation as well. I will discus the practical problem of local tsunami warning. With the example of the Illapel earthquake, as well as some other large events, I will discuss a flexible strategy for local tsunami warning that relies on regional geodetic and seismic stations. Rapid earthquake source information, provided by methodologies developed for earthquake early warning, can be used to generate timely estimates of maximum expected tsunami amplitude with enough accuracy for tsunami warning. This approach does not require deployment of new geodetic and seismic instrumentation in many subduction zones, and could be implemented rapidly by national monitoring and warning agencies.

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10:00 am - Employer Spotlight-Schlumberger

Employer Spotlight-Schlumberger

  Start: February 29, 2016 at 10:00 am     End: February 29, 2016 at 3:00 pm
 Location:JGB 2.112 Career Center
 Contact:Maurine Riess, mriess@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-7673
Representatives from Schlumberger will be in the Career Center to meet with JSG students about job opportunities. Come by anytime from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

http://careers.slb.com/

      
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