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9:00 am - Career Center Open House

Career Center Open House

  Start: March 2, 2015 at 9:00 am     End: March 2, 2015 at 12:00 pm
 Location:JGB 2.112 Martineau Career Services Suite
 Contact:Chelsea Ochoa, chelsea.ochoa@jsg.utexas.edu, 5122320893
JSG students, faculty and staff are invited to come by the Career Center for coffee and bagels.

12:00 pm - Soft Rock Seminar - Reynaldy Fifariz

Soft Rock Seminar - Reynaldy Fifariz

  Start: March 2, 2015 at 12:00 pm     End: March 2, 2015 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222

3:00 pm - Climate Forum speaker series: Prof. Elinor Martin

Climate Forum speaker series: Prof. Elinor Martin

  Start: March 2, 2015 at 3:00 pm     End: March 2, 2015 at 4:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Kai Zhang, kzkaizhang@gmail.com
Elinor Martin (Assistant Prof. from Oklahoma Univ.)

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10:00 am - Employer Spotlight Day: TCEQ

Employer Spotlight Day: TCEQ

  Start: March 3, 2015 at 10:00 am     End: March 3, 2015 at 3:00 am
 Location:JGB 2.112 Martineau Career Services Suite
 Contact:Maurine Riess, mriess@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-7673
EMPLOYER SPOTLIGHT DAYS
A career services program designed to bring employers and students together in a relaxed, informative setting.

TCEQ will be on hand to visit with students and to talk about current full-time and internship openings.

Where: JGB 2.112 Career Center
Time: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Students are welcome to stop by at any time during the day.
Refreshments will be provided. Business casual dress recommended.

4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: PhD Talk

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: PhD Talk

  Start: March 3, 2015 at 4:00 pm     End: March 3, 2015 at 5:00 pm

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10:30 am - BEG Seminar

BEG Seminar

  Start: March 5, 2015 at 10:30 am     End: March 5, 2015 at 11:30 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
William W. Simpkins
Professor and Chair, Department of Geological and Atmospheric Sciences
Smith Family Foundation Departmental Chair in Geology
Iowa State University

Abstract:
Enteric viruses have been observed in the Ames aquifer, an alluvial/buried valley aquifer composed of sand and gravel that supplies drinking water to Ames, Iowa (pop. 59,000). The focus of this study was the Downtown well field, where continuous pumping induces flow from the South Skunk River (SSR) nearly 1.4 km away into the well field. Because the SSR watershed contains 13 wastewater treatment plants and 109 swine CAFOs upstream, it was hypothesized that enteric viruses of both human and animal origin could be drawn into the well field by induced infiltration. The experimental design consisted of four sampling sites along a groundwater flow path at distances of 3.1 m to 2 km from the SSR. Velocity estimates predict that viruses would travel to Site D at the farthest point within two years. Fifty samples were collected and analyzed for adenovirus, enterovirus, norovirus, rotavirus, Bacteroides, and Hepatitis E virus (HEV), as well as Cl, ?18O, and ?2H, during seven sampling events (October 2011 to October 2012). Untreated sewage was sampled twice. Viruses were analyzed using real-time qPCR and RT-qPCR methods. At least one virus was detected in 42% of the samples, with groundwater showing detections in 39% of samples in the unconfined part of the aquifer next to the SSR and in 28% of the samples in the confined part of the aquifer. Adenovirus Subgroup A and HEV were the most frequently detected. Sewage samples showed the highest concentrations of adenovirus subgroups A and C, D, F, but contained no HEV. Sequencing showed adenovirus A31 to be the only serotype in the SSR and sewage; G3 HEV was the only genotype present and only in the SSR. This evidence suggests that the SSR is the source of G3 HEV (likely a swine source) and adenovirus A31 (human source) in the aquifer, thus confirming the original hypothesis about groundwater transport via induced infiltration. The occurrence of G1 norovirus and Campylobacter jejuni in two municipal wells, but not in the SSR, suggests possible entry through leaks in the sanitary sewer systems and/or well casing. In the case of enteric viruses in the Downtown well field, human enteric viruses come both river and sanitary sewer sources, while animal enteric viruses appear to come solely from the South Skunk River.

4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Owen A Anfinson

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Owen A Anfinson

  Start: March 5, 2015 at 4:00 pm     End: March 5, 2015 at 5:00 pm

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9:00 am - BEG Friday Seminar Series

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: March 6, 2015 at 9:00 am     End: March 6, 2015 at 10:00 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
John R. Dribus
Global Geosciences Advisor
Schlumberger

Abstract:
Since the Macondo incident occurred in the Gulf of Mexico, the oil and gas industry has been diligent in following a three-step approach to addressing various drilling hazards that may be encountered in deep water: Identification, Prevention, and Mitigation. This presentation focuses on the important step of understanding the geologic origin of various hazards in deep water and around salt by reviewing the geologic origin, characteristics, and behaviors of the three deep water hazard types:

1. Man-made surface hazards including linear geometry and single site geometry hazards.
2. Sea-floor hazards including pockmarks, mud volcanoes, and mass sediment movement.
3. Sub-surface geologic hazards including shallow water flows, reactivated faults, and gas chimneys.

In addition, various potential drilling hazards may also be encountered when drilling massive salt and layered evaporates to reach prospective targets below. These challenges may occur when drilling:
1. Into the top of an allochthonous salt canopy (cap rock issues),
2. Through massive salt and layered evaporite complexes (including sediment inclusions, salt-to-salt sutures, and mobile layered evaporates), and
3. Emerging from salt or evaporites (including rubble zones, feeders, mobile bitumen) and other potential hazards.


2:00 pm - UTIG Seminar Series: Brandon Schmandt, University of New Mexico

UTIG Seminar Series: Brandon Schmandt, University of New Mexico

  Start: March 6, 2015 at 2:00 pm     End: March 6, 2015 at 3:00 pm
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Nick Hayman, hayman@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-7721
 URL:Event Link
"Seismic Structure beneath EarthScope’s USArray and the Origin of the Yellowstone Hotspot"

Abstract:

The seismic component of the EarthScope program includes >2500 broadband seismographs progressively deployed across the contiguous United States since 2005. The resulting data facilitate seismic imaging from the crust to deep within the mantle and are providing new insights into convective processes beneath North America such as the sinking and fragmentation of the Farallon slab and mantle upwelling beneath areas of intraplate volcanism such as the Yellowstone hotspot. Recent imaging indicates that the heat source for Yellowstone magmatism is rooted in the lower mantle and a buoyant plume is rising through a gap between fragments of the Farallon slab. A relatively local increase in broadband seismograph coverage near Yellowstone has also improved imaging of the crustal scale magmatic system, which shows two concentrated low-velocity anomalies thought to represent melt reservoirs in the shallow and deep crust.

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12:00 pm - Soft Rock Seminar - Eric Petersen

Soft Rock Seminar - Eric Petersen

  Start: March 9, 2015 at 12:00 pm     End: March 9, 2015 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222

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9:00 am - AAPG Distinguished Lecturer Seminar

AAPG Distinguished Lecturer Seminar

  Start: March 10, 2015 at 9:00 am     End: March 10, 2015 at 10:00 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
Chris Wojcik
Geophysical Advisor with Deepwater Exploration
Shell

Abstract:
Direct Hydrocarbon Indicator (DHI) support for hydrocarbons in the Niger Delta has been recognized for several decades. Largely unconsolidated Tertiary shallow marine and deepwater clastics are characterized by strong amplitude response related to hydrocarbon presence. Bright-spot amplitude anomalies have been an attractive exploration target since early 70s. However, even in a well-calibrated basin as the Niger Delta, amplitudes do not always ‘work’. Both false positives, as well as hydrocarbon-bearing reservoirs without any DHI support, are fairly common. The remaining exploration potential in the Niger Delta is still significant thus there is a clear driver to improve our ability to assess the potential for DHI support beyond classic bright-spot plays, as well as to polarize exploration risks to avoid costly failures.

The assessment of any seismic anomaly always includes an observational component and a predictive component. A comprehensive and robust predictive framework must be based on a detailed, geologically-driven integration of the available data across different scales, from a thin section to a seismic loopset, and with a good understanding of geologic controls of elastic rock properties. Key geological variables, such as reservoir and seal texture, pressure history and diagenesis, impact the type, magnitude and detectability of DHI’s. The rock properties knowledge and understanding of geologic controls can be organized into robust, basin or play-wide predictive frameworks enabling forward modeling of any subsurface scenarios and comparison with the actual seismic data in the prospective areas.

The classic Niger Delta bright-spot play can be considered mature, so there is a clear need to extend the amplitude-driven exploration to include other types of DHI’s such as dim spots and other more subtle anomaly types. The dim spot plays, with generally weaker hydrocarbon signal, are elusive, but they are recognized as holding large, generally under-explored potential. This paper presents an overview of key controlling factors that impact seismic response and cause rapid transition from bright spots to dim spots, and the transition from amplitude to AvO anomalies. Many clastic Tertiary basins globally follow similar stratigraphic and diagenetic evolution, thus the Niger Delta example may be a good analogue for subtle DHI plays elsewhere.

4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: PhD Talk

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: PhD Talk

  Start: March 10, 2015 at 4:00 pm     End: March 10, 2015 at 5:00 am

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10:00 am - Employer Spotlight Day: PBW

Employer Spotlight Day: PBW

  Start: March 12, 2015 at 10:00 am     End: March 12, 2015 at 3:00 pm
 Location:JGB 2.112 Martineau Career Services Suite
 Contact:Maurine Riess, mriess@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-7673
EMPLOYER SPOTLIGHT DAYS
A career services program designed to bring employers and students together in a relaxed, informative setting

Pastor Behling & Wheeler will be on hand to visit with students and discuss current openings.
Where: JGB 2.112 Career Center
Time: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Students are welcome to stop by throughout the day. Refreshments will be provided.
Business casual dress recommended.

4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Mike Hudec

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Mike Hudec

  Start: March 12, 2015 at 4:00 pm     End: March 12, 2015 at 5:00 pm

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9:00 am - BEG Friday Seminar Series

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: March 13, 2015 at 9:00 am     End: March 13, 2015 at 10:00 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
John Harju
Associate Director for Research
Energy & Environmental Research Center
University of North Dakota

Abstract:
Total oil in place estimates for the Bakken Petroleum System range from 300 billion barrels (Bbbl) to as high as 900 Bbbl. Estimates for primary recovery range from 3% to 12% depending on reservoir characteristics. When considering these low recovery factors in the context of such a large resource, it is clear that small improvements in productivity could increase technically recoverable Bakken oil by billions of barrels. While the use of CO2 in conventional reservoirs is a widely applied and well understood practice, its use for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) in tight oil reservoirs is a relatively new concept. In conventional reservoirs, heterogeneity, wettability, gravity, and relative permeability characteristics have a significant impact on the effectiveness of an EOR scheme, and fracture networks could be detrimental to EOR operations. In tight oil reservoirs, like the Bakken, which rely on fracture networks for productivity, the conventional notion of positive and negative attributes may or may not apply. A research program is being conducted to determine the viability of using CO2 for EOR in the Bakken. The key elements of the program include the development and integration of new and existing reservoir characterization and laboratory analytical data (core analyses, well logs, oil analyses, etc.) and static and dynamic modeling. Specific aspects of the project include
1) detailed geological characterization of selected Bakken reservoirs; 2) characterization of Bakken oils from the selected reservoirs; 3) laboratory experimental work to determine rates of hydrocarbon diffusion from Bakken matrix materials in the presence of CO2 under reservoir conditions; 4) static geomodeling, including the integration of multimineral petrophysical analysis, discrete fracture networks, and dual porosity-permeability elements; and 5) dynamic simulation of potential CO2 injection scenarios. Initial experimental data and modeling results indicate CO2 injection may substantially improve oil production while storing significant amounts of CO2. The results of this project are being used to plan and implement a pilot-scale CO2-based EOR test in a Bakken reservoir.

10:30 am - UTIG Seminar Series: John Snedden, UTIG

UTIG Seminar Series: John Snedden, UTIG

  Start: March 13, 2015 at 10:30 am     End: March 13, 2015 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Nick Hayman, hayman@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-7721
 URL:Event Link
"Interaction of Deep-water Deposition and a Mid-Ocean Spreading Center, Eastern Gulf of Mexico Basin, USA"

Abstract:

The general position of a Jurassic-Early Cretaceous spreading center in the eastern Gulf of Mexico has been suggested for many years, yet the precise location has not been defined. New seismic reflection and refraction data and plate reconstructions allows for delineation of this Tithonian to Valanginian age ocean ridge system and illuminate its prolonged influence on deep-water Cretaceous sedimentation. The extinct spreading center displays morphological characteristics associated with slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges: 1) large and wide axial valleys, ranging from 5 to 20 km wide; 2) deep axial valleys, often over 2 km deep; 3) normal faults that dip toward axial valleys; and 4) discontinuous, isolated basement highs, with elevations over 1km above regional oceanic basement depth that reflect local variations in magma supply.

Correlation from Florida Platform wells to this extinct spreading center confirms the precise time of oceanic crustal emplacement and thus estimation of spreading rate, consistent with plate reconstructions and morphotectonic observations. Reflections tied to the Top Haynesville-Buckner, Cotton Valley-Bossier, and Cotton Valley-Knowles downlap onto contemporaneous oceanic crust, confirming the depositional history of the area. These correlations imply that source rock intervals such as the Tithonian and Oxfordian are absent in a large portion of the abyssal plain south of the Florida escarpment.

The extinct spreading center remained a major element of the deep-water seascape, diverting sediment gravity flows during the Mesozoic. Pronounced depositional thicks occur north of the ridge line confirming that it acted as a partial barrier to seismogenic debris flows initiated by the Chicxulub impact but derived from the Florida Platform area.

The extinct spreading center and its associated seamounts are prominent structural highs that are draped by prospective Paleogene and younger reservoir intervals. Several of these features have been leased by oil companies for possible future drilling. Exploration here would test the outer limits of several Cenozoic play fairways, both from a reservoir and source rock standpoint.


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Undergraduate Externships

Undergraduate Externships

  Start: March 19, 2015     End: March 19, 2015
 Location:Austin
 Contact:Chelsea Ochoa, chelsea.ochoa@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-0893
 URL:Event Link
Participate in the undergraduate externship program! More information on externship sites can be found on GeoSource.

An externship is an unpaid career exploration opportunity for undergraduate students. Externs spend a day shadowing and learning at a host organization during an academic break. Hosts can be alumni or friends of the Jackson School, or companies looking to build their presence with students.

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12:00 pm - Soft Rock Seminar - Joseph Levy

Soft Rock Seminar - Joseph Levy

  Start: March 23, 2015 at 12:00 pm     End: March 23, 2015 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222

3:00 pm - Climate Forum speaker series: Prof. Katharine Hayhoe

Climate Forum speaker series: Prof. Katharine Hayhoe

  Start: March 23, 2015 at 3:00 pm     End: March 23, 2015 at 4:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Kai Zhang, kzkaizhang@gmail.com
Katharine Hayhoe (Prof. from Texas Tech Univ.)

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4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: PhD Talk

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: PhD Talk

  Start: March 24, 2015 at 4:00 pm     End: March 24, 2015 at 5:00 pm

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4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Julia Clarke

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Julia Clarke

  Start: March 26, 2015 at 4:00 pm     End: March 26, 2015 at 5:00 pm

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9:00 am - BEG Friday Seminar Series

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: March 27, 2015 at 9:00 am     End: March 27, 2015 at 10:00 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
Dr. Svetlana Ikonnikova
Energy Economist
Bureau of Economic Geology

Abstract:
There are an increasing number of geologists and engineers that have become involved in shale gas research. However, the current fall in oil prices demonstrates how much the demand and funding for our research depends on energy prices. This talk will discuss in what way and to what extent shale gas drilling and profitability depends on economic parameters and how much it relies on other non-economic variables.

The talk will start with an overview of the key drivers for new shale gas/oil well drilling based on the discounted cash flow model. We will review the value of liquids, sensitivity to the natural gas price, and economic limit. Then, we will dig deeper and look at how operators may adjust to prices and keep their profitability by managing completion costs and by rationing drilling locations. The objective is to show in simple terms how economic parameters are integrated with engineering and geologic knowledge to support operator’s decision to drill. The role of geologic uncertainty as well as the knowledge of the major geologic attributes will be addressed.

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12:00 pm - Soft Rock Seminar - David Brown

Soft Rock Seminar - David Brown

  Start: March 30, 2015 at 12:00 pm     End: March 30, 2015 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222

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4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Speaker Series: PhD Talk

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: PhD Talk

  Start: March 31, 2015 at 4:00 pm     End: March 31, 2015 at 5:00 pm

     
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