Marine Geosciences

From tectonics at active plate margins to clastic sedimentation and carbonate systems in the marine environment, our research encompasses a wide range of marine geology and geophysics. Our researchers also study the interactions between oceanography and climate with tectonic and sedimentary systems and use a variety of techniques to past environments and paleoclimatology. Our rapid response program allows us to make timely field observations of transient geohazard events.

Research in the Marine Geosciences theme focuses on the following subthemes:

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Faculty

Jaime D Barnes

Jaime D Barnes

Stable isotope geochemistry, metamorphism and volatile transport in subduction zones, fluid-rock interaction and metasomatism, geochemical cycling, stable chlorine isotopes
Thorsten  Becker

Thorsten Becker

mantle convection; plate tectonics; structural seismology; numerical modeling; earthquakes; fluid dynamics
Patrick  Heimbach

Patrick Heimbach

Heimbach's research group (Computational Research in Ice and Ocean Systems -- (CRIOS)), in the Oden Institute is engaged in a number of projects, with main funding from NASA, NSF, and ONR. (1)
Charles  Kerans

Charles Kerans

Carbonate sequence stratigraphy, depositional systems, reservoir characterization, basin analysis, seismic interpretation, seismic stratigraphy, paleokarst analysis, carbonate diagenesis
John C Lassiter

John C Lassiter

Earth's origin and evolution, isotope and trace element geochemistry, the role of crust and lithospheric mantle recycling in the generation of mantle chemical heterogeneity, the origin and distribution of water and other volatile elements in the Earth's interior, and the thermal and chemical evolution of the Earth's core and core/...
Luc L Lavier

Luc L Lavier

Tectonics; the structural and geodynamical evolution of continental and oceanic rifts, as well as collisional environments; numerical techniques to model tectonic processes on crustal and lithospheric scales; deformation; subduction
Matthew A Malkowski

Matthew A Malkowski

Timothy B Rowe

Timothy B Rowe

Vertebrate paleontology, evolution and development of the vertebrate skeleton, phylogenetic systematics, the early history of mammals and their extinct relatives among Synapsida, the history of birds and their extinct relatives among Dinosauria, the history of other amniotes, high-resolution X-ray computed tomography, CT scanner, DigiMorph, informatics
Scott W Tinker

Scott W Tinker

Global energy supply and demand, Technology Administration, Multidisciplinary reservoir characterization, Carbonate sedimentology, Sequence stratigraphy, 3-D reservoir modeling, Resource assessment.

Lecturers

Nathaniel R Miller

Nathaniel R Miller

Sedimentary geochemistry, isotope geochemistry, Earth system evolution, Q-ICP-MS, microanalytics, GIS, Neoproterozoic climate [link: http://www.jsg.utexas.edu/news/2018/05/new-research-suggests-that-dawn-of-plate-tectonics-could-have-turned-earth-into-snowball/]

Affiliated Faculty

Kathy Ellins

Kathy Ellins

Geoscience education; Discipline Based Education Research (DBER); teacher professional development; geoscience curriculum development; undergraduate geoscience teacher preparation; climate literacy; geoscience, art and design engagement

Emeritus

William L Fisher

William L Fisher

Basin analysis, sequence stratigraphy, depositional systems, petroleum geology, resource assessment, energy policy
Lawrence A Lawver

Lawrence A Lawver

Marine geophysics, plate tectonics, magnetics, gravity, heat flow, seismic studies, paleogeographic reconstructions of Gondwana, the Polar Regions, East Asia, and the Western Pacific
Sharon  Mosher

Sharon Mosher

Structural petrology, field-oriented structural geology, the evolution of complexly deformed terranes, strain analysis, deformation mechanisms, the interaction between chemical and physical processes during deformation
Paul L Stoffa

Paul L Stoffa

Multichannel seismic acquisition, signal processing, acoustic and elastic wave propagation, modeling and inversion of geophysical data
Frederick W Taylor

Frederick W Taylor

Tectonic geomorphology, stratigraphy, and paleogeodesy/paleoseismology at convergent plate margins Paleoclimate, fossil corals as a proxy for past sea-surface temperatures. Corals as recorders of relative sea level for vertical tectonics and sea-level history.

Postdocs

Tanner Mills

Tanner Mills

Jingxuan  Wei

Jingxuan Wei

Marine geology and geophysics, active-source seismology, physical oceanography, coastal processes.

Research Scientists

Jamin S Greenbaum

Jamin S Greenbaum

Tingwei (Lucy) Ko

Source Rock Characterization Geochemistry (Organic, Biomarker, Gas Isotope) Mudrock Characterization Petrography, SEM
Kitty L Milliken

Kitty L Milliken

Petrography and geochemistry of siliciclastic rocks; diagenesis; electron microbeam methods: X-ray mapping, cathodoluminescence imaging; micro-scale reservoir characterization
Elizabeth  Spiers

Elizabeth Spiers

Michael L Sweet

Michael L Sweet


Research Staff

Jose L Abella Gutierrez

Jose L Abella Gutierrez

Marcy B Davis

Marcy B Davis

Multibeam sonar acquisition and data processing; Map, figure, project promotional materials and poster illustration using GMT, MB System, Fledermaus, Adobe CS2, ArcGIS, and csh; Web page design and maintenance; Science writing
Nathaniel R Miller

Nathaniel R Miller

Sedimentary geochemistry, isotope geochemistry, Earth system evolution, Q-ICP-MS, microanalytics, GIS, Neoproterozoic climate [link: http://www.jsg.utexas.edu/news/2018/05/new-research-suggests-that-dawn-of-plate-tectonics-could-have-turned-earth-into-snowball/]
Kutalmis  Saylam

Kutalmis Saylam

remote sensing, lidar, sea ice, marine geophysics, hydrology, lidar bathymetry
Ramon Trevino

Ramon Trevino

Sequence stratigraphic interpretations (well logs, 3-D seismic), integrated reservoir characterization, subsurface correlation and mapping (using workstation and PC) and subsurface structural interpretation (using 3-D seismic), project management, CO2 sequestration
Yujiang  Xie

Yujiang Xie

Christopher K Zahm

Christopher K Zahm

Reservoir characterization, flow modeling in fractured reservoirs, porosity-permeability evolution

Graduate Students

Soraya Alfred

Jonathan P Amendola

Jonathan P Amendola

I am interested in glaciomarine environments with particular focus on geomorphology and sediment depositional processes.

William S Bailey

Luis Escobar Arenas

Luis Escobar Arenas

The research of Luis Carlos (he/him) is focused on clastic sedimentary environments and stratigraphic architecture. He uses thin sections, lab analyses, outcrops, cores, well logs and seismic data to predict subseismic architecture and its impact on connectivity. Furthermore, he is interested in efforts to increase diversity, equity and inclusion ...

Kyle W Fouke

Hector K Garza

Andrew Gase

Andrew Gase

I use seismic and electromagnetic geophysical methods to probe the earth at lithospheric and environmental scales. My recent interests include subduction zone structure, volcanic geomorphology, and magmatic-tectonic interactions.
Landon  Lockhart

Landon Lockhart

My expertise is in petrophysics and geomechanics, and I have proficiency in log-based petrophysical analysis, in laboratory measurements, and broadly in geomechanics, both in conventional and unconventional reservoirs. A key highlight of my research is the development of a model to predict pore pressure in the Permian Basin. In this ...

Nicholas J Montiel

Ema Parker

My research focuses on employing active marine electromagnetic (EM) methods to study lithosphere-biosphere dynamics and, by extension, potential implications those mechanisms may have for the New Blue Economy. I also have a key interest in expanding the Jackson School's marine EM capabilities.
Medha  Prakash

Medha Prakash

My research interests are primarily in astrobiology and planetary surface processes. I am working Sean Gulick and Cyril Grima to better understand the geology of Schrdinger crater on the Moon using radar data. This site is of interest to upcoming Artemis missions. My previous research includes literature syntheses pertaining ...
Sabrina A Reichert

Sabrina A Reichert

Marine seismic tomography of the Blake Plateau, with consideration of magnetic and bathymetric data to illuminate the tectonic and magmatic mechanisms of continental breakup, as well as seafloor spreading phenomena in the Central Atlantic Ocean.
Fernando  Rey

Fernando Rey

My research focus is to link the stratigraphic record with tectonic processes using geochronology and geochemical signatures. I am currently working on projects in southern Patagonia (Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Rocas Verdes Back-arc basin) and Japan (Neogene opening of the Sea of Japan).I am also interested in the dispersal of ...
Kevin W Shionalyn

Kevin W Shionalyn

ice-ocean interactions, glaciology, machine learning, acoustics, geophysics
Patty  Standring

Patty Standring

Co-advised by Dr. Chris Lowery and Dr. Rowan Martindale for PhD. Current research is focused on deep ocean current changes in the southern Gulf of Mexico, surface circulation changes in the western Atlantic around the Eocene-Oligocene Transition (EOT) using stable isotopes from benthic and planktic foraminifera combined with paleoecology, and ...
Travis N Stone

Travis N Stone

Travis Stone is a fourth year PhD candidate working in the Martindale lab. He received his B.S. in Geological Sciences in 2018 from California State University, Fullerton, where he studied Triassic reefs and their recovery following the End-Permian mass extinction in the Panthalassic Ocean. Travis' research is focused on ecosystem ...
Steven J Wedel

Steven J Wedel

Clean Energy Finance, Clean Energy Technology, Sustainability, start-ups focused on saving the planet
On a general level, Marine Geosciences is a multi-disciplinary endeavor and students take a broad range of courses. This includes a Marine Geology & Geophysics Field Course to provide hands-on instruction for graduate and upper-level undergraduate students in collecting and processing Marine Geosciences data.
 

Marine Geology & Geophysics

GEO 381T Marine Tectonics
Tectonic processes within the dynamic Earth, with a focus on oceanic structures. Subjects may include fundamentals of plate tectonics; plate motion, driving forces, and mantle convection; evolution of triple junction and plate margins; plate reconstructions; earthquakes and focal mechanisms; structure and geochemistry of the Earth's interior; mantle structure and tomography; rheology and deformation mechanisms in mantle and crust; heat flow, gravity, the geoid, and paleomagnetism; hotspots and mantle plumes; seafloor spreading and oceanic spreading ridges; oceanic transform faults and fracture zones; and subduction zones, volcanic island arcs, and marginal seas. Only one of the following may be counted: Geological Sciences 338T, 371C (Topic: Tectonics I), 381T, 391 (Topic: Tectonics I). May not be substituted for any required geological sciences course.
GEO f391/f348K Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course
Each Maymester we offer a field course designed to provide hands-on instruction for graduate and upper-level undergraduate students in the collection and processing of marine geological and geophysical (MG&G) data. The course covers high-resolution air gun and streamer seismic reflection, CHIRP seismic reflection, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, sediment coring, grab sampling and the sedimentology of resulting seabed samples (e.g., core description, grain size analysis, x-radiography, etc.) [More on instrumentation here]. Scientific and technical experts in each of the techniques first provide students classroom instruction. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of at-sea field work as well as on-shore lab work. Two small research vessels are used concurrently: one for multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and sediment sampling, and the other for high-resolution seismic reflection and CHIRP sub-bottom profiling. Students rotate daily between the two vessels and lab work. Upon returning to Austin, students, working in teams, are expected to integrate the techniques into a final project that examines the geologic history and/or sedimentary processes as typified by a small area of the Gulf Coast continental shelf. This class satisfies field experience requirements for some degree programs. Enrollment is limited to 12 students.
GEO 391 Marine Geology
Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences. Some topics require additional prerequisites; these are identified in the Course Schedule. Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.
GEO 391 Marine Geology and Geophysics Topics
 

Sedimentology & Stratigraphy

GEO 380G Construction and Interpretation of 3-D Stratigraphy
Uses three-dimensional volumes of basin-filling stratigraphy to explore how depositional landscapes are preserved in the sedimentary record and how sedimentary deposits can be analyzed to produce quantitative reconstructions of past environmental states. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
GEO 380R Dynamics of Sedimentary Systems I
Explores the fundamental concepts of transport systems at the Earth's surface, focusing on principles and quantitative aspects of fluid flow, sediment transport, and bedforms, as well as atmospheric and oceanic circulation, complex systems, and the integration of small-scale processes in developing quantitative stratigraphic models. Four lecture hours a week for one semester. Geological Sciences 380E and 380R may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
GEO 383 Depositional Systems: Terrigenous Clastics
The processes, characteristics, and relationships among fluvial, deltaic, shore-zone, shelf, and slope depositional systems; depositional basin analysis used in stratigraphy and economic geology. Four lecture hours a week for one semester, with two weekend field trips. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.
GEO 383N Depositional Systems: Carbonates/Evaporites
Analysis of carbonate and evaporite depositional systems from sedimentary structures, faunal and ichnofaunal associations, grain types, vertical and lateral facies successions within time-significant packages, and sediment body geometries. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered irregularly. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.
GEO 380N Sequence Stratigraphy
Use of seismic reflection systems for quantitative stratigraphic characterization of the subsurface. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Geological Sciences 416M and 465K or their equivalents.
GEO 383S Sedimentary Basin Analysis
Quantitative and applied study of basin subsidence and sediment accumulation. The first half of the course considers theoretical basin evolution due to flexural, thermal, dynamic, and fault-related subsidence. The second half of the course involves in-depth analysis of selected basin systems and includes student research projects and presentations on assigned topics. Specific topics vary from year to year. Normally offered in the spring semester only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Geological Sciences 383 or the equivalent.
GEO 383T Tectonic Climate Interaction in Foreland Basins
Integration of recent advances in the understanding of modern and ancient foreland basin sedimentation, quantitative basin modeling, regional and global climate change, and the geometry and kinematics of fold-thrust belts. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.
 

Geophysics

GEO 383D Numerical Methods I
A survey of geophysical data analysis methods, with a focus on time series, including sampling and aliasing, convolution and correlation, statistics, linear digital filters, properties and applications of the discrete Fourier transform, and least squares. Instruction in MATLAB and Fortran and solution of data analysis problems using these two languages. Two lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
GEO 391 Earth Dynamics
The study of the evolution of the Earth lithosphere and its tectonics evolution sometimes requires a quantitative approach based on continuum mechanics. The aim of this class is to provide the basic tools to approach geological questions in a quantitative manner. The major outstanding questions concerning the formation of convergent and extensional plate margins as well as mantle convection will be addressed. This course is based on a discussion of the physical properties of earth materials and dynamic processes in the solid Earth. We will follow Geodynamics by Turcotte & Schubert, in covering topics in stress and strain, elasticity and flexure, heat transfer, gravity, fluid mechanics, rock rheology, and crustal faulting as mechanisms and consequences of plate tectonics. Other material on the rheological properties of Earth materials will be provided as the class proceeds. We will also perform numerical and analogue experiments of tectonic and geodynamics processes.
GEO 384C Geophysics I: Exploration Geophysics
Seismic, gravity, magnetic, electrical, and electromagnetic methods of exploration for petroleum and minerals. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
GEO 384S Seismic Reflection Processing
Reduction of seismic and other geophysical data from field data to final geologic cross sections, using real data sets and commercial seismic processing software. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester. Offered irregularly. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, and Geological Sciences 384R or the equivalent.
GEO 384G Subsurface Mapping on Petroleum Workstations
Introduction to basin analysis, subsurface mapping, and petroleum exploration using a workstation. Subjects may include common tectonic settings of petroleum basins, seismic stratigraphy, structural styles, and petroleum systems. Workstation techniques include well log editing, lithology interpretation, correlation of tectonic events, integration of seismic and subsurface well data, interpretation of two- and three-dimensional seismic reflection data and structure, and isopach and seismic attribute mapping. Geological Sciences 384G and 391 (Topic: Introduction to Petroleum Workstations) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.
 

Structure and Tectonics

GEO 386G GIS & GPS Applications in Earth Sciences
Theory and practice of geographic information system (GIS) and Global Positioning System (GPS) technologies, and their applications to problems in earth sciences. Laboratories and field trips provide hands-on experience with the collection, mapping, and analysis of geologic and other field data using GPS equipment and GIS software. Topics include map projections; datums and reference frames; cartographic principles; remotely sensed data (satellite and aerial photos, image radar); vector- and raster-based image formats; geospatial data resources; GIS software applications; surveying principles; GPS constellation and data structure; differential GPS; data logging schemes; GPS postprocessing software; integration of GPS and GIS in mapmaking; extant GIS applications in geology and hydrogeology. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours a week for one semester, and two weekend field trips. Offered in the fall semester only. Geological Sciences 386G and 391 (Topic: Geographic Information System and Global Positioning System Applications in Earth Sciences) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences and consent of instructor.
GEO 381K Tectonic Problems
Origin of regional structural features, complex and controversial structures; tectonic control of ore deposits. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences and consent of instructor. Course number may be repeated for credit when the topics vary.
GEO 391 Ins and Outs of Subduction Zones
GEO 380C Advanced Structural Geology
Origin of earth structures, solution of advanced structural problems, newest techniques, field techniques, and field problems. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor.
GEO 391 Continental Tectonics
 

Hydrogeology

GEO 291 Hydrogeophysics
For each semester hour of credit earned, the equivalent of one class hour a week for one semester; additional hours may be required for some topics. Offered irregularly. May be repeated for credit when the topics vary. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in geological sciences. Some topics require additional prerequisites; these are identified in the Course Schedule.
GEO 382D Crustal Geofluids
Designed to provide a technical foundation for exploring how fluids drive fundamental geologic processes in sedimentary basins. Includes characterizing pressure and stress in sedimentary basins, exploring the origin of overpressure through theory and characterization, and examining how pressure and stress couple. Problems include how sedimentation generates overpressure, how hydrocarbons are trapped in the subsurface, how mud volcanoes form, how submarine landslides are generated, and the origin of methane hydrates. Geological Sciences 382D and 391 (Topic: Crustal Fluids) may not both be counted. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.
 

Climate

GEO 380T Paleoclimatology
Examines climate records encoded in sedimentary archives through geologic time. Normally offered in the fall semester only. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor.
GEO 391 Late Pleistocene Variability

Research in Marine Geology and Geophysics

Graduate
There are opportunities for research within Marine Geology and Geophysics.
Posted by: Sean Gulick

Graduate student positions in geomechanics and geofluids

Graduate
The GeoMechanics and GeoFluids research group has immediate opportunities for graduate and postdoctoral study. Drs. Saffer and Flemings are most enthused by students who have a commitment to a doctoral program because that allows time to delve deeply into research. However, we also regularly accept exceptional M.S. students into our research group. If you are interested, please email Demian Saffer (demian@ig.utexas.edu) or Peter Flemings (pflemings@jsg.utexas.edu). Browse opportunities and learn more about our research group at UT GeoMechanics and GeoFluids.
Posted by: Peter Flemings

MSc or PhD Student

Graduate
Our team is almost always interested in recruiting new graduate students who are interested in paleoecology, marine communities, carbonate sedimentology, and/or geobiology. We currently have teo areas of focus, modern and Pleistocene reef and coastal communities in Jamaica and Early Jurassic marine paleoecology in Morocco
Posted by: Rowan Martindale

High Resolution 3D marine seismic for fluid studies

Graduate
Opportunities exist to become involved in the design, acquisition, processing, and interpretation of high-resolution 3D marine seismic data. Current applications include characterization for subsurface storage of carbon dioxide and natural fluid migration studies. We anticipate development into imaging modern systems as reservoir analogs.
Posted by: Tip Meckel

PhD/MS opportunities

Graduate
My group welcomes new students with strong motivations on understanding how solid Earth and planets operate and its impacts on shaping habitable surface environments. Prospective students are expected to have a STEM background. If these describe you, feel free to contact me through email for position openings in my group.
Posted by: Chenguang Sun

Graduate opportunities at OCEEMlab

Graduate - Five years
OCEEMlab welcomes future graduate students of high caliber who are passionate about exploring new frontiers in Ocean and Earth science. At OCEEMlab, we study lithosphere-biosphere dynamic processes and complex systems using a combination of fieldwork, advanced computational modeling, and integrative data science. We seek candidates with solid foundations in natural sciences and programming skills. We are especially interested in bringing on board individuals with interdisciplinary knowledge who are highly motivated in weaving disciplines such as geophysics, geology, oceanography, geochemistry, and environmental molecular biology to address contemporary challenging research questions. Most importantly, in the core values of OCEEMlab lies courtesy to one another, encouraging natural curiosity, and cohesive teamwork; As a team, we can achieve far more than individuals. In addition, we firmly believe that groundbreaking discoveries are accomplished by walking on the fringes of science rather than at the center. Thus, we encourage unorthodox genuine thinkers to join our team and help us stretch the envelope of human knowledge a tiny bit further.
Posted by: Eric Attias

Postdocs opportunities at OCEEMlab

Graduate - Two years
OCEEMlab welcomes applicants via UTIG's Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellows Program. At OCEEMlab, we study lithosphere-biosphere dynamic processes and complex systems using a combination of fieldwork, advanced computational modeling, and integrative data science. We are especially interested in bringing on board individuals with interdisciplinary knowledge who are highly motivated in weaving disciplines such as geophysics, geology, oceanography, geochemistry, and environmental molecular biology to address contemporary challenging research questions. Contact Dr. Attias for further information.
Posted by: Eric Attias

Geomechanics and Geofluids Research Jobs for Undergrads

Undergraduate
Do you want to study the Earth while learning the ins-and-outs of cutting-edge laboratory equipment, from maintenance to experiment design? UT GeoMechanics and GeoFluids investigates fluid flow and deformation in Earth materials using lab experiments, field work, and computer modeling. We seek hard-working and detail-oriented students with a passion for learning. You will assist with ongoing projects: offshoots could lead to your senior thesis. Tasks will include everything from the routine to the experimentally complex. You will work independently or with staff and researchers on experimental setup, equipment maintenance, laboratory clean up, sample preparation, data analysis, and a host of other tasks. For more information contact Josh O'Connell. Learn more about our research projects at UT GeoMechanics and GeoFluids.
Posted by: Peter Flemings

Sedimentological characterization along the North Slope of Alaska

Undergraduate - ~4 months
The Arctic is melting! How will the earths frozen surface and subsurface respond to a warming world? We are looking for a summer student intern (fully paid) to help us characterize the geology of Arctic seabed in northernmost Alaska. The project is funded by Sandia National Labs and provides the student with an opportunity to interact with a potential future employer while enhancing our climate security. The student will be introduced to a diverse array of data types including seismic reflection, core data, and remote sensing observations. This work will provide the broader UT-Austin and Sandia team with a better understanding of Arctic shelf geology and help guide planning efforts for future site surveys and data collection. Results will impact decisions and serve as excellent exposure to problem solving in the field of geosciences.
Posted by: Matthew Malkowski

Mantle and Fault System Dynamics Graduate Research

Graduate
The UT Geodynamics Team is always looking for motivated graduate and undergraduate students. The University of Texas at Austin hosts an exciting and diverse community of researchers at the Jackson School of Geoscience, which includes the UTIG and DGS units with which I am affiliated. At UT, we are colocated and collaborate with a number of others, including at the Texas Advanced Computing Center and the Oden Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences. We are always looking for motivated students with a keen interest and solid background in the Earth sciences, physics, engineering, or computer science. Please take a look at some of our recent publications to give you an idea of current projects, but I like to work with students who think and work independently and challenge and extend my expertise and interests. Please consider applying for our program should you be interested in pursuing a PhD in my research group, and see the JSG pages for admission procedures. The (important) Fellowship deadline is December 1 each year. If you think this could be a match, please do reach out by email.
Posted by: Thorsten Becker

Carbon Cycle in Arctic Permafrost

Graduate
I am looking for a new graduate student who is interested in research on carbon cycle in Arctic Permafrost.
Posted by: Kehua You

Offshore CO2 Storage

Graduate - Seeking Graduate Research Assistant interested in integrated seismic, well log, and geology integration for CO2 storage resource assessment.
Current DOE grant to study CO2 storage options in the Gulf of Mexico offshore Corpus Christi, Texas.
Posted by: Tip Meckel

Carbon Cpature and Geologic Storage

Undergraduate - ongoing - get in touch: tip.meckel@beg.utexas.edu
The Gulf Coast Carbon Center often engages with undergradutes in geology, EER, and petroleum engineering on topic related to carbon capture and geologic storage (CCS).
Posted by: Tip Meckel

Bars in Tidal Environments

Gulf Basin Depositional Synthesis Project

The UT Gulf Basin Depositional Synthesis Project (GBDS) is an ongoing, industry-supported, comprehensive synthesis of Cenozoic fill of the entire Gulf of Mexico basin. The results are distributed as a digital data base that is updated regularly. The project has led to major new contributions to the understanding of the depositional history and framework of the Gulf of Mexico Basin. The project has focused on refining sequence correlations between the continental margin and deep basin stratigraphies, mapping sedimentary transport axes and paleogeographies through time, defining the evolving roles of submarine canyons, retrogradational margins, and shelf-margin delta systems in localizing in time and space sand transport to the slope and abyssal plain, and better understanding regional controls on reservoir facies and their deposition.).