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Read the 2014 Newsletter - A tradition since 1950, the Newsletter highlights research, news and achievements by Jackson School faculty, students, scientists and alumni

Read the 2014 Newsletter

A tradition since 1950, the Newsletter highlights research, news and achievements by Jackson School faculty, students, scientists and alumni

Video: GeoFORCE - Changing lives since 2005

Video: GeoFORCE

Changing lives since 2005

Video: Unveiling Earth's Surface - Airborne lidar at the Jackson School's Bureau of Economic Geology

Video: Unveiling Earth's Surface

Airborne lidar at the Jackson School's Bureau of Economic Geology

Video: Preserving Stories From the Rocks - Bureau of Economic Geology core facility is vital for research and exploration

Video: Preserving Stories From the Rocks

Bureau of Economic Geology core facility is vital for research and exploration

Video: Fire, Ice & Huge Quantity of Potential Energy - Researchers at the Jackson School of Geosciences are leading a project to learn more about frozen methane under the Gulf of Mexico

Video: Fire, Ice & Huge Quantity of Potential Energy

Researchers at the Jackson School of Geosciences are leading a project to learn more about frozen methane under the Gulf of Mexico

Video: New Stash of Ice Age Fossils

Video: New Stash of Ice Age Fossils

Editor’s Note: This is part of a series of Q-and-A’s with UT’s deans. This interview has been edited and condensed. Sharon Mosher has been dean of the Jackson School of Geosciences since 2009. The Daily Texan: Can you tell us a...

FEB
26

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Pieter Vermeesch
12:00 AM

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Pieter Vermeesch

  Start: February 26, 2015     End: February 26, 2015

FEB
27

BEG Friday Seminar Series
9:00 AM

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Pieter Vermeesch

  Start: February 26, 2015     End: February 26, 2015

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: February 27, 2015 at 9:00 am     End: February 27, 2015 at 10:00 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
Matthew W. Becker, Ph.D
Professor of Geology and Conrey Chair in Hydrogeology
Department of Geological Sciences, California State University Long Beach

Abstract:
The heterogeneous flow of fluids in fractures is a common challenge for enhanced oil recovery, geothermal circulation, and groundwater remediation systems. The cubic relationship between fracture aperture and flow rate, compounded by complex fracture network connectivity, leads to flow channeling, diversion, or short circuiting. We have been experimenting with periodic hydraulic tests as an economical and effective method for predicting flow heterogeneity and inter-well hydraulic connectivity. The propagation of a periodic signal through the formation follows preferential hydraulic pathways. Monitoring the amplitude and phase shift of the periodic signal at multiple wells can indicate the presence of high permeability flow paths (fairways) or hydraulically isolated zones. Following a brief summary of fluid flow in fractured rock systems, results from numerical simulations and field experiments will be presented. The field experimental site is unique in that flow paths can be imaged using surface ground penetrating radar. Channeling evident in the radar images confirmed the hydraulic connections measured by periodic hydraulic tests and tracer experiments. Potentially, periodic hydraulic methods could be used to test alternative structural mechanical models given sufficient pressure data.

FEB
27

UTIG Seminar Series: Jessica Tierney, WHOI
10:30 AM

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Pieter Vermeesch

  Start: February 26, 2015     End: February 26, 2015

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: February 27, 2015 at 9:00 am     End: February 27, 2015 at 10:00 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
Matthew W. Becker, Ph.D
Professor of Geology and Conrey Chair in Hydrogeology
Department of Geological Sciences, California State University Long Beach

Abstract:
The heterogeneous flow of fluids in fractures is a common challenge for enhanced oil recovery, geothermal circulation, and groundwater remediation systems. The cubic relationship between fracture aperture and flow rate, compounded by complex fracture network connectivity, leads to flow channeling, diversion, or short circuiting. We have been experimenting with periodic hydraulic tests as an economical and effective method for predicting flow heterogeneity and inter-well hydraulic connectivity. The propagation of a periodic signal through the formation follows preferential hydraulic pathways. Monitoring the amplitude and phase shift of the periodic signal at multiple wells can indicate the presence of high permeability flow paths (fairways) or hydraulically isolated zones. Following a brief summary of fluid flow in fractured rock systems, results from numerical simulations and field experiments will be presented. The field experimental site is unique in that flow paths can be imaged using surface ground penetrating radar. Channeling evident in the radar images confirmed the hydraulic connections measured by periodic hydraulic tests and tracer experiments. Potentially, periodic hydraulic methods could be used to test alternative structural mechanical models given sufficient pressure data.

UTIG Seminar Series: Jessica Tierney, WHOI

  Start: February 27, 2015 at 10:30 am     End: February 27, 2015 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Yuko Okumura, Yukoo@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-8844
 URL:Event Link
"Past and Future Climate Change in the Horn of Africa"

Abstract:

The Horn of Africa is a geopolitically volatile region that is highly vulnerable to climatic change. A recent decline in rainfall in the region has led some to speculate whether global warming will lead to more frequent drought. However, others maintain that the decline is a feature of internal climate variability. Establishing which interpretation is correct is critical for future predictions of food security in the region. Here, I’ll present new paleoclimate records that give us a first look at recent past changes in rainfall and temperature in the Horn of Africa. Interpreted in the context of CMIP5 historical and future climate simulations, these data change our view of future climate change in the region and question our ability to accurately simulate regional climate in East Africa. Future climate change will likely act as a threat multiplier in the Horn region, exacerbating existing vulnerabilities associated with political instability, terrorism, and piracy.

MAR
02

Career Center Open House
9:00 AM

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Pieter Vermeesch

  Start: February 26, 2015     End: February 26, 2015

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: February 27, 2015 at 9:00 am     End: February 27, 2015 at 10:00 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
Matthew W. Becker, Ph.D
Professor of Geology and Conrey Chair in Hydrogeology
Department of Geological Sciences, California State University Long Beach

Abstract:
The heterogeneous flow of fluids in fractures is a common challenge for enhanced oil recovery, geothermal circulation, and groundwater remediation systems. The cubic relationship between fracture aperture and flow rate, compounded by complex fracture network connectivity, leads to flow channeling, diversion, or short circuiting. We have been experimenting with periodic hydraulic tests as an economical and effective method for predicting flow heterogeneity and inter-well hydraulic connectivity. The propagation of a periodic signal through the formation follows preferential hydraulic pathways. Monitoring the amplitude and phase shift of the periodic signal at multiple wells can indicate the presence of high permeability flow paths (fairways) or hydraulically isolated zones. Following a brief summary of fluid flow in fractured rock systems, results from numerical simulations and field experiments will be presented. The field experimental site is unique in that flow paths can be imaged using surface ground penetrating radar. Channeling evident in the radar images confirmed the hydraulic connections measured by periodic hydraulic tests and tracer experiments. Potentially, periodic hydraulic methods could be used to test alternative structural mechanical models given sufficient pressure data.

UTIG Seminar Series: Jessica Tierney, WHOI

  Start: February 27, 2015 at 10:30 am     End: February 27, 2015 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Yuko Okumura, Yukoo@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-8844
 URL:Event Link
"Past and Future Climate Change in the Horn of Africa"

Abstract:

The Horn of Africa is a geopolitically volatile region that is highly vulnerable to climatic change. A recent decline in rainfall in the region has led some to speculate whether global warming will lead to more frequent drought. However, others maintain that the decline is a feature of internal climate variability. Establishing which interpretation is correct is critical for future predictions of food security in the region. Here, I’ll present new paleoclimate records that give us a first look at recent past changes in rainfall and temperature in the Horn of Africa. Interpreted in the context of CMIP5 historical and future climate simulations, these data change our view of future climate change in the region and question our ability to accurately simulate regional climate in East Africa. Future climate change will likely act as a threat multiplier in the Horn region, exacerbating existing vulnerabilities associated with political instability, terrorism, and piracy.

Career Center Open House

  Start: March 2, 2015 at 9:00 am     End: March 2, 2015 at 12:00 pm
 Location:JGB 2.112 Martineau Career Services Suite
 Contact:Chelsea Ochoa, chelsea.ochoa@jsg.utexas.edu, 5122320893
JSG students, faculty and staff are invited to come by the Career Center for coffee and bagels.

more →

Alumni - Tailgates, reunions and continuing education with your fellow alums
Tailgates, reunions and continuing education with your fellow alums
New Salt Tectonics Complex - Honoring Martin Jackson, raising funds towards a newly renovated Salt Tectonics Modeling Complex
Honoring Martin Jackson, raising funds towards a newly renovated Salt Tectonics Modeling Complex
Geoscience Education - Summit on Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education: Summary Report & Survey
Summit on Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education: Summary Report & Survey
GeoFORCE Challenge Match - This endowment has launched to ensure the continuation of this critical program
This endowment has launched to ensure the continuation of this critical program
Work at JSG - The Jackson School is hiring. Apply online.
The Jackson School is hiring. Apply online.
Find a Supervisor - Grad students work with over 70 scientists in 9 research disciplines
Grad students work with over 70 scientists in 9 research disciplines
 
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