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Read the 2014 Newsletter - A tradition since 1950, the Newsletter highlights research, news and achievements by Jackson School faculty, students, scientists and alumni

Read the 2014 Newsletter

A tradition since 1950, the Newsletter highlights research, news and achievements by Jackson School faculty, students, scientists and alumni

Video: GeoFORCE - Changing lives since 2005

Video: GeoFORCE

Changing lives since 2005

Video: Unveiling Earth's Surface - Airborne lidar at the Jackson School's Bureau of Economic Geology

Video: Unveiling Earth's Surface

Airborne lidar at the Jackson School's Bureau of Economic Geology

Video: Preserving Stories From the Rocks - Bureau of Economic Geology core facility is vital for research and exploration

Video: Preserving Stories From the Rocks

Bureau of Economic Geology core facility is vital for research and exploration

Video: Fire, Ice & Huge Quantity of Potential Energy - Researchers at the Jackson School of Geosciences are leading a project to learn more about frozen methane under the Gulf of Mexico

Video: Fire, Ice & Huge Quantity of Potential Energy

Researchers at the Jackson School of Geosciences are leading a project to learn more about frozen methane under the Gulf of Mexico

Video: New Stash of Ice Age Fossils

Video: New Stash of Ice Age Fossils

Editor’s Note: This is part of a series of Q-and-A’s with UT’s deans. This interview has been edited and condensed. Sharon Mosher has been dean of the Jackson School of Geosciences since 2009. The Daily Texan: Can you tell us a...

MAR
06

BEG Friday Seminar Series
9:00 AM

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: March 6, 2015 at 9:00 am     End: March 6, 2015 at 10:00 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
John R. Dribus
Global Geosciences Advisor
Schlumberger

Abstract:
Since the Macondo incident occurred in the Gulf of Mexico, the oil and gas industry has been diligent in following a three-step approach to addressing various drilling hazards that may be encountered in deep water: Identification, Prevention, and Mitigation. This presentation focuses on the important step of understanding the geologic origin of various hazards in deep water and around salt by reviewing the geologic origin, characteristics, and behaviors of the three deep water hazard types:

1. Man-made surface hazards including linear geometry and single site geometry hazards.
2. Sea-floor hazards including pockmarks, mud volcanoes, and mass sediment movement.
3. Sub-surface geologic hazards including shallow water flows, reactivated faults, and gas chimneys.

In addition, various potential drilling hazards may also be encountered when drilling massive salt and layered evaporates to reach prospective targets below. These challenges may occur when drilling:
1. Into the top of an allochthonous salt canopy (cap rock issues),
2. Through massive salt and layered evaporite complexes (including sediment inclusions, salt-to-salt sutures, and mobile layered evaporates), and
3. Emerging from salt or evaporites (including rubble zones, feeders, mobile bitumen) and other potential hazards.

MAR
06

UTIG Seminar Series: Brandon Schmandt, University of New Mexico
2:00 PM

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: March 6, 2015 at 9:00 am     End: March 6, 2015 at 10:00 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
John R. Dribus
Global Geosciences Advisor
Schlumberger

Abstract:
Since the Macondo incident occurred in the Gulf of Mexico, the oil and gas industry has been diligent in following a three-step approach to addressing various drilling hazards that may be encountered in deep water: Identification, Prevention, and Mitigation. This presentation focuses on the important step of understanding the geologic origin of various hazards in deep water and around salt by reviewing the geologic origin, characteristics, and behaviors of the three deep water hazard types:

1. Man-made surface hazards including linear geometry and single site geometry hazards.
2. Sea-floor hazards including pockmarks, mud volcanoes, and mass sediment movement.
3. Sub-surface geologic hazards including shallow water flows, reactivated faults, and gas chimneys.

In addition, various potential drilling hazards may also be encountered when drilling massive salt and layered evaporates to reach prospective targets below. These challenges may occur when drilling:
1. Into the top of an allochthonous salt canopy (cap rock issues),
2. Through massive salt and layered evaporite complexes (including sediment inclusions, salt-to-salt sutures, and mobile layered evaporates), and
3. Emerging from salt or evaporites (including rubble zones, feeders, mobile bitumen) and other potential hazards.

UTIG Seminar Series: Brandon Schmandt, University of New Mexico

  Start: March 6, 2015 at 2:00 pm     End: March 6, 2015 at 3:00 pm
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Nick Hayman, hayman@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-7721
 URL:Event Link
"Seismic Structure beneath EarthScope’s USArray and the Origin of the Yellowstone Hotspot"

Abstract:

The seismic component of the EarthScope program includes >2500 broadband seismographs progressively deployed across the contiguous United States since 2005. The resulting data facilitate seismic imaging from the crust to deep within the mantle and are providing new insights into convective processes beneath North America such as the sinking and fragmentation of the Farallon slab and mantle upwelling beneath areas of intraplate volcanism such as the Yellowstone hotspot. Recent imaging indicates that the heat source for Yellowstone magmatism is rooted in the lower mantle and a buoyant plume is rising through a gap between fragments of the Farallon slab. A relatively local increase in broadband seismograph coverage near Yellowstone has also improved imaging of the crustal scale magmatic system, which shows two concentrated low-velocity anomalies thought to represent melt reservoirs in the shallow and deep crust.

MAR
09

Soft Rock Seminar - Eric Petersen
12:00 PM

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: March 6, 2015 at 9:00 am     End: March 6, 2015 at 10:00 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
John R. Dribus
Global Geosciences Advisor
Schlumberger

Abstract:
Since the Macondo incident occurred in the Gulf of Mexico, the oil and gas industry has been diligent in following a three-step approach to addressing various drilling hazards that may be encountered in deep water: Identification, Prevention, and Mitigation. This presentation focuses on the important step of understanding the geologic origin of various hazards in deep water and around salt by reviewing the geologic origin, characteristics, and behaviors of the three deep water hazard types:

1. Man-made surface hazards including linear geometry and single site geometry hazards.
2. Sea-floor hazards including pockmarks, mud volcanoes, and mass sediment movement.
3. Sub-surface geologic hazards including shallow water flows, reactivated faults, and gas chimneys.

In addition, various potential drilling hazards may also be encountered when drilling massive salt and layered evaporates to reach prospective targets below. These challenges may occur when drilling:
1. Into the top of an allochthonous salt canopy (cap rock issues),
2. Through massive salt and layered evaporite complexes (including sediment inclusions, salt-to-salt sutures, and mobile layered evaporates), and
3. Emerging from salt or evaporites (including rubble zones, feeders, mobile bitumen) and other potential hazards.

UTIG Seminar Series: Brandon Schmandt, University of New Mexico

  Start: March 6, 2015 at 2:00 pm     End: March 6, 2015 at 3:00 pm
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Nick Hayman, hayman@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-7721
 URL:Event Link
"Seismic Structure beneath EarthScope’s USArray and the Origin of the Yellowstone Hotspot"

Abstract:

The seismic component of the EarthScope program includes >2500 broadband seismographs progressively deployed across the contiguous United States since 2005. The resulting data facilitate seismic imaging from the crust to deep within the mantle and are providing new insights into convective processes beneath North America such as the sinking and fragmentation of the Farallon slab and mantle upwelling beneath areas of intraplate volcanism such as the Yellowstone hotspot. Recent imaging indicates that the heat source for Yellowstone magmatism is rooted in the lower mantle and a buoyant plume is rising through a gap between fragments of the Farallon slab. A relatively local increase in broadband seismograph coverage near Yellowstone has also improved imaging of the crustal scale magmatic system, which shows two concentrated low-velocity anomalies thought to represent melt reservoirs in the shallow and deep crust.

Soft Rock Seminar - Eric Petersen

  Start: March 9, 2015 at 12:00 pm     End: March 9, 2015 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222

MAR
10

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: PhD Talk
4:00 PM

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: March 6, 2015 at 9:00 am     End: March 6, 2015 at 10:00 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
John R. Dribus
Global Geosciences Advisor
Schlumberger

Abstract:
Since the Macondo incident occurred in the Gulf of Mexico, the oil and gas industry has been diligent in following a three-step approach to addressing various drilling hazards that may be encountered in deep water: Identification, Prevention, and Mitigation. This presentation focuses on the important step of understanding the geologic origin of various hazards in deep water and around salt by reviewing the geologic origin, characteristics, and behaviors of the three deep water hazard types:

1. Man-made surface hazards including linear geometry and single site geometry hazards.
2. Sea-floor hazards including pockmarks, mud volcanoes, and mass sediment movement.
3. Sub-surface geologic hazards including shallow water flows, reactivated faults, and gas chimneys.

In addition, various potential drilling hazards may also be encountered when drilling massive salt and layered evaporates to reach prospective targets below. These challenges may occur when drilling:
1. Into the top of an allochthonous salt canopy (cap rock issues),
2. Through massive salt and layered evaporite complexes (including sediment inclusions, salt-to-salt sutures, and mobile layered evaporates), and
3. Emerging from salt or evaporites (including rubble zones, feeders, mobile bitumen) and other potential hazards.

UTIG Seminar Series: Brandon Schmandt, University of New Mexico

  Start: March 6, 2015 at 2:00 pm     End: March 6, 2015 at 3:00 pm
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Nick Hayman, hayman@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-7721
 URL:Event Link
"Seismic Structure beneath EarthScope’s USArray and the Origin of the Yellowstone Hotspot"

Abstract:

The seismic component of the EarthScope program includes >2500 broadband seismographs progressively deployed across the contiguous United States since 2005. The resulting data facilitate seismic imaging from the crust to deep within the mantle and are providing new insights into convective processes beneath North America such as the sinking and fragmentation of the Farallon slab and mantle upwelling beneath areas of intraplate volcanism such as the Yellowstone hotspot. Recent imaging indicates that the heat source for Yellowstone magmatism is rooted in the lower mantle and a buoyant plume is rising through a gap between fragments of the Farallon slab. A relatively local increase in broadband seismograph coverage near Yellowstone has also improved imaging of the crustal scale magmatic system, which shows two concentrated low-velocity anomalies thought to represent melt reservoirs in the shallow and deep crust.

Soft Rock Seminar - Eric Petersen

  Start: March 9, 2015 at 12:00 pm     End: March 9, 2015 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: PhD Talk

  Start: March 10, 2015 at 4:00 pm     End: March 10, 2015 at 5:00 am

more →

Alumni - Tailgates, reunions and continuing education with your fellow alums
Tailgates, reunions and continuing education with your fellow alums
New Salt Tectonics Complex - Honoring Martin Jackson, raising funds towards a newly renovated Salt Tectonics Modeling Complex
Honoring Martin Jackson, raising funds towards a newly renovated Salt Tectonics Modeling Complex
Geoscience Education - Summit on Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education: Summary Report & Survey
Summit on Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education: Summary Report & Survey
GeoFORCE Challenge Match - This endowment has launched to ensure the continuation of this critical program
This endowment has launched to ensure the continuation of this critical program
Work at JSG - The Jackson School is hiring. Apply online.
The Jackson School is hiring. Apply online.
Find a Supervisor - Grad students work with over 70 scientists in 9 research disciplines
Grad students work with over 70 scientists in 9 research disciplines
 
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