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In research of significance to the world’s expanding coastal populations, scientists have found that geology and infrastructure play key roles in determining whether aquifers that provide drinking water are inundated with seawater during a typhoon or hurricane and how long...

APR
24

BEG Friday Seminar Series
9:00 AM

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: April 24, 2015 at 9:00 am     End: April 24, 2015 at 10:00 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
WenZhan Song
Professor and Director of Sensorweb Research Laboratory
Georgie State University

Abstract:
The seismic imaging process today involves massive seismic data collection from hundreds and thousands of seismic sensors to a central place for post computing. The whole process is expensive and often takes days even months to complete. There is great demand for real-time as it would reduce the costs and risks of E&P and mitigate the environment concerns. This talk presents an innovative Real-time In-situ Seismic Imaging (RISI) system that can compute the 3D subsurface imaging in seconds. The RISI system is a mesh network of seismometers that sense and process seismic signals, and compute 3D tomography in-situ in real-time. Instead of data collection then post processing, the mesh network performs the distributed data processing and tomographic inversion computing under the severe bandwidth and resource constraints, and generates an evolving 3D subsurface image as more events arrive. Several innovative distributed tomographic computing algorithms based on travel-time tomography principles have been successfully developed and validated using both synthetic and real-world seismic data set. The hardware prototype system has also been implemented and can be extended as a general field instrumentation platform, to incorporate new geophysical data processing and computing algorithms, beyond seismic.

APR
24

UTIG Seminar Series: David Stillman, NCAR
10:30 AM

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: April 24, 2015 at 9:00 am     End: April 24, 2015 at 10:00 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
WenZhan Song
Professor and Director of Sensorweb Research Laboratory
Georgie State University

Abstract:
The seismic imaging process today involves massive seismic data collection from hundreds and thousands of seismic sensors to a central place for post computing. The whole process is expensive and often takes days even months to complete. There is great demand for real-time as it would reduce the costs and risks of E&P and mitigate the environment concerns. This talk presents an innovative Real-time In-situ Seismic Imaging (RISI) system that can compute the 3D subsurface imaging in seconds. The RISI system is a mesh network of seismometers that sense and process seismic signals, and compute 3D tomography in-situ in real-time. Instead of data collection then post processing, the mesh network performs the distributed data processing and tomographic inversion computing under the severe bandwidth and resource constraints, and generates an evolving 3D subsurface image as more events arrive. Several innovative distributed tomographic computing algorithms based on travel-time tomography principles have been successfully developed and validated using both synthetic and real-world seismic data set. The hardware prototype system has also been implemented and can be extended as a general field instrumentation platform, to incorporate new geophysical data processing and computing algorithms, beyond seismic.

UTIG Seminar Series: David Stillman, NCAR

  Start: April 24, 2015 at 10:30 am     End: April 24, 2015 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Joe MacGregor, joemac@ig.utexas.edu, (512) 471-0411
 URL:Event Link
"Evidence of Flowing Liquid Water on Mars, Right Now"

Abstract:

Recurring slope lineae (RSL) are narrow (0.5-5 m) low-albedo features that incrementally lengthen down steep slopes during warm seasons. All RSL sites have steep slopes (25-40°), outcropping bedrock, and lower albedo than average for Mars. Evidence of surficial material transport and unambiguous spectral signatures of salt have not been detected. Dry and wet origins have been suggested, but water-based hypotheses best match observations that correlate incremental lengthening with higher surface temperatures. Over 165 candidate and confirmed RSL sites have been discovered from 42°N to 52°S. Some RSL sites have more than 1,000 individual RSL and numerous RSL sites are found in the deep canyons of Valles Marineris. In this talk, Dr. Stillman will compare and contrast HiRISE (25 cm/pixel) observations of seasonal, yearly, and latitudinal changes in RSL behavior, present atmospheric, thermal, and hydrological modeling of these features, and describe the mechanism(s) that recharge and source RSL.

APR
27

Climate Forum speaker series: Mike Wallace
3:00 PM

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: April 24, 2015 at 9:00 am     End: April 24, 2015 at 10:00 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
WenZhan Song
Professor and Director of Sensorweb Research Laboratory
Georgie State University

Abstract:
The seismic imaging process today involves massive seismic data collection from hundreds and thousands of seismic sensors to a central place for post computing. The whole process is expensive and often takes days even months to complete. There is great demand for real-time as it would reduce the costs and risks of E&P and mitigate the environment concerns. This talk presents an innovative Real-time In-situ Seismic Imaging (RISI) system that can compute the 3D subsurface imaging in seconds. The RISI system is a mesh network of seismometers that sense and process seismic signals, and compute 3D tomography in-situ in real-time. Instead of data collection then post processing, the mesh network performs the distributed data processing and tomographic inversion computing under the severe bandwidth and resource constraints, and generates an evolving 3D subsurface image as more events arrive. Several innovative distributed tomographic computing algorithms based on travel-time tomography principles have been successfully developed and validated using both synthetic and real-world seismic data set. The hardware prototype system has also been implemented and can be extended as a general field instrumentation platform, to incorporate new geophysical data processing and computing algorithms, beyond seismic.

UTIG Seminar Series: David Stillman, NCAR

  Start: April 24, 2015 at 10:30 am     End: April 24, 2015 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Joe MacGregor, joemac@ig.utexas.edu, (512) 471-0411
 URL:Event Link
"Evidence of Flowing Liquid Water on Mars, Right Now"

Abstract:

Recurring slope lineae (RSL) are narrow (0.5-5 m) low-albedo features that incrementally lengthen down steep slopes during warm seasons. All RSL sites have steep slopes (25-40°), outcropping bedrock, and lower albedo than average for Mars. Evidence of surficial material transport and unambiguous spectral signatures of salt have not been detected. Dry and wet origins have been suggested, but water-based hypotheses best match observations that correlate incremental lengthening with higher surface temperatures. Over 165 candidate and confirmed RSL sites have been discovered from 42°N to 52°S. Some RSL sites have more than 1,000 individual RSL and numerous RSL sites are found in the deep canyons of Valles Marineris. In this talk, Dr. Stillman will compare and contrast HiRISE (25 cm/pixel) observations of seasonal, yearly, and latitudinal changes in RSL behavior, present atmospheric, thermal, and hydrological modeling of these features, and describe the mechanism(s) that recharge and source RSL.

Climate Forum speaker series: Mike Wallace

  Start: April 27, 2015 at 3:00 pm     End: April 27, 2015 at 4:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Kai Zhang, kzkaizhang@gmail.com

APR
27

Soft Rock Seminar - Kealie Goodwin
12:00 PM

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: April 24, 2015 at 9:00 am     End: April 24, 2015 at 10:00 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
WenZhan Song
Professor and Director of Sensorweb Research Laboratory
Georgie State University

Abstract:
The seismic imaging process today involves massive seismic data collection from hundreds and thousands of seismic sensors to a central place for post computing. The whole process is expensive and often takes days even months to complete. There is great demand for real-time as it would reduce the costs and risks of E&P and mitigate the environment concerns. This talk presents an innovative Real-time In-situ Seismic Imaging (RISI) system that can compute the 3D subsurface imaging in seconds. The RISI system is a mesh network of seismometers that sense and process seismic signals, and compute 3D tomography in-situ in real-time. Instead of data collection then post processing, the mesh network performs the distributed data processing and tomographic inversion computing under the severe bandwidth and resource constraints, and generates an evolving 3D subsurface image as more events arrive. Several innovative distributed tomographic computing algorithms based on travel-time tomography principles have been successfully developed and validated using both synthetic and real-world seismic data set. The hardware prototype system has also been implemented and can be extended as a general field instrumentation platform, to incorporate new geophysical data processing and computing algorithms, beyond seismic.

UTIG Seminar Series: David Stillman, NCAR

  Start: April 24, 2015 at 10:30 am     End: April 24, 2015 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Joe MacGregor, joemac@ig.utexas.edu, (512) 471-0411
 URL:Event Link
"Evidence of Flowing Liquid Water on Mars, Right Now"

Abstract:

Recurring slope lineae (RSL) are narrow (0.5-5 m) low-albedo features that incrementally lengthen down steep slopes during warm seasons. All RSL sites have steep slopes (25-40°), outcropping bedrock, and lower albedo than average for Mars. Evidence of surficial material transport and unambiguous spectral signatures of salt have not been detected. Dry and wet origins have been suggested, but water-based hypotheses best match observations that correlate incremental lengthening with higher surface temperatures. Over 165 candidate and confirmed RSL sites have been discovered from 42°N to 52°S. Some RSL sites have more than 1,000 individual RSL and numerous RSL sites are found in the deep canyons of Valles Marineris. In this talk, Dr. Stillman will compare and contrast HiRISE (25 cm/pixel) observations of seasonal, yearly, and latitudinal changes in RSL behavior, present atmospheric, thermal, and hydrological modeling of these features, and describe the mechanism(s) that recharge and source RSL.

Climate Forum speaker series: Mike Wallace

  Start: April 27, 2015 at 3:00 pm     End: April 27, 2015 at 4:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Kai Zhang, kzkaizhang@gmail.com

Soft Rock Seminar - Kealie Goodwin

  Start: April 27, 2015 at 12:00 pm     End: April 27, 2015 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222

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This endowment has launched to ensure the continuation of this critical program
Work at JSG - The Jackson School is hiring. Apply online.
The Jackson School is hiring. Apply online.
Find a Supervisor - Grad students work with over 70 scientists in 9 research disciplines
Grad students work with over 70 scientists in 9 research disciplines
 
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