Skip Navigation
The University of Texas at Austin
Read the 2014 Newsletter - A tradition since 1950, the Newsletter highlights research, news and achievements by Jackson School faculty, students, scientists and alumni

Read the 2014 Newsletter

A tradition since 1950, the Newsletter highlights research, news and achievements by Jackson School faculty, students, scientists and alumni

Video: Fire, Ice & Huge Quantity of Potential Energy - Researchers at the Jackson School of Geosciences are leading a project to learn more about frozen methane under the Gulf of Mexico

Video: Fire, Ice & Huge Quantity of Potential Energy

Researchers at the Jackson School of Geosciences are leading a project to learn more about frozen methane under the Gulf of Mexico

Video: Unveiling Earth's Surface - Airborne lidar at the Jackson School's Bureau of Economic Geology

Video: Unveiling Earth's Surface

Airborne lidar at the Jackson School's Bureau of Economic Geology

Video: New Stash of Ice Age Fossils

Video: New Stash of Ice Age Fossils

The Miracle of Flight - A graduate student discovers the largest flying animal in history: the Texas Pterosaur

The Miracle of Flight

A graduate student discovers the largest flying animal in history: the Texas Pterosaur

Risk of Amazon Rainforest Dieback is Higher Than IPCC Projects

Risk of Amazon Rainforest Dieback is Higher Than IPCC Projects

  Texas water supplies, currently stressed by drought, could be further affected by the federal listing of five freshwater mussel species under the Endangered Species Act, but most of the potential impacts could be mitigated by innovative water strategies, according to...

NOV
20

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Jean Cline
4:00 PM

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Jean Cline

  Start: November 20, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: November 20, 2014 at 5:00 pm

NOV
21

BEG Friday Seminar Series
9:00 AM

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Jean Cline

  Start: November 20, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: November 20, 2014 at 5:00 pm

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: November 21, 2014 at 9:00 am     End: November 21, 2014 at 10:00 pm
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
***NO STREAMING VIDEO OF THIS TALK***

Andrew Duncan
Senior Geoscience Advisor, Reservoir Development Services
Baker Hughes

Borehole Imaging at Baker Hughes

Abstract:
Borehole Imaging was an evolutionary step-change from the dipmeter technology of the 80s and early 90s. It is around 20 years since Baker Hughes launched their first wireline borehole imagers, and from that time there have been multiple advances in imaging technology. Imaging tools are now routinely employed in both water and oil-based mud systems, on wireline and on LWD. Most major and independent oil and gas operators are aware of the basic capabilities of these tools, but not all have a complete understanding of the range of interpretation possibilities they provide. This overview will discuss the principal tool types available in industry and touch on how such tools can help us to gain invaluable information from the subsurface.

NOV
21

UTIG Seminar Series: Onno Oncken, Freie Universität Berlin
10:30 AM

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Jean Cline

  Start: November 20, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: November 20, 2014 at 5:00 pm

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: November 21, 2014 at 9:00 am     End: November 21, 2014 at 10:00 pm
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
***NO STREAMING VIDEO OF THIS TALK***

Andrew Duncan
Senior Geoscience Advisor, Reservoir Development Services
Baker Hughes

Borehole Imaging at Baker Hughes

Abstract:
Borehole Imaging was an evolutionary step-change from the dipmeter technology of the 80s and early 90s. It is around 20 years since Baker Hughes launched their first wireline borehole imagers, and from that time there have been multiple advances in imaging technology. Imaging tools are now routinely employed in both water and oil-based mud systems, on wireline and on LWD. Most major and independent oil and gas operators are aware of the basic capabilities of these tools, but not all have a complete understanding of the range of interpretation possibilities they provide. This overview will discuss the principal tool types available in industry and touch on how such tools can help us to gain invaluable information from the subsurface.

UTIG Seminar Series: Onno Oncken, Freie Universität Berlin

  Start: November 21, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: November 21, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Nick Hayman, hayman@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-7721
 URL:Event Link
"Locking, Mass Flux and Topographic Response at Plate Boundaries – The Chilean Case"

Abstract:

On the long term, convergent plate boundaries have been shown to be controlled by either accretion/underplating or by subduction erosion. Vertical surface motion is coupled to convergence rate - typically with an uplift rate of the coastal area ranging from 0 to +50% of convergence rate in accretive systems, and -20 to +30% in erosive systems. Vertical kinematics, however, are not necessarily linked to horizontal strain mode, i.e. upper plate shortening or extension, in a simple way. This range of kinematic behaviors - as well as their acceleration where forearcs collide with oceanic ridges/plateau - is well expressed along the Chilean plate margin.

Towards the short end of the time scale, we here find that fault motion as well as vertical motion may exhibit reversal of motion from the preseismic to the postseismic stage, and may show extensional as well as compressional deformation to temporally coexist next to each other. This complexity is suggested to be chiefly controlled by seismic cycle related forearc bending and unbending causing fault triggering in the upper plate, a mechanism unique to forearcs. In addition, the short term deformation time end appears to exhibit a close correlation with the frictional properties and geodetic locking at the plate interface. Corroborating analogue experiments of strain accumulation during multiple earthquake cycles, forearc deformation and uplift focus above the downdip and updip end of seismic coupling and slip and are each related to a particular stage of the seismic cycle, but with opposite trends for both domains. Similarly, barriers separating locked domains along strike appear to accumulate most upper plate faulting interseismically. Hence, locking patters are reflected in topography. From the long-term memory contained in the forearc topography the relief of the Chilean forearc seems to reflect long term stability of the observed heterogeneity of locking at the plate interface. Finally, the nature of locking at the plate interface controlling the above kinematic behavior appears to be strongly controlled by the degree of fluid overpressuring at the plate interface suggesting that the hydraulic system at the interface takes a key role for forearc response.

NOV
24

Soft Rock Seminar: Rattanaporn Fong-Ngern
12:00 PM

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Jean Cline

  Start: November 20, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: November 20, 2014 at 5:00 pm

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: November 21, 2014 at 9:00 am     End: November 21, 2014 at 10:00 pm
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; Building 130; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
***NO STREAMING VIDEO OF THIS TALK***

Andrew Duncan
Senior Geoscience Advisor, Reservoir Development Services
Baker Hughes

Borehole Imaging at Baker Hughes

Abstract:
Borehole Imaging was an evolutionary step-change from the dipmeter technology of the 80s and early 90s. It is around 20 years since Baker Hughes launched their first wireline borehole imagers, and from that time there have been multiple advances in imaging technology. Imaging tools are now routinely employed in both water and oil-based mud systems, on wireline and on LWD. Most major and independent oil and gas operators are aware of the basic capabilities of these tools, but not all have a complete understanding of the range of interpretation possibilities they provide. This overview will discuss the principal tool types available in industry and touch on how such tools can help us to gain invaluable information from the subsurface.

UTIG Seminar Series: Onno Oncken, Freie Universität Berlin

  Start: November 21, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: November 21, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Nick Hayman, hayman@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-7721
 URL:Event Link
"Locking, Mass Flux and Topographic Response at Plate Boundaries – The Chilean Case"

Abstract:

On the long term, convergent plate boundaries have been shown to be controlled by either accretion/underplating or by subduction erosion. Vertical surface motion is coupled to convergence rate - typically with an uplift rate of the coastal area ranging from 0 to +50% of convergence rate in accretive systems, and -20 to +30% in erosive systems. Vertical kinematics, however, are not necessarily linked to horizontal strain mode, i.e. upper plate shortening or extension, in a simple way. This range of kinematic behaviors - as well as their acceleration where forearcs collide with oceanic ridges/plateau - is well expressed along the Chilean plate margin.

Towards the short end of the time scale, we here find that fault motion as well as vertical motion may exhibit reversal of motion from the preseismic to the postseismic stage, and may show extensional as well as compressional deformation to temporally coexist next to each other. This complexity is suggested to be chiefly controlled by seismic cycle related forearc bending and unbending causing fault triggering in the upper plate, a mechanism unique to forearcs. In addition, the short term deformation time end appears to exhibit a close correlation with the frictional properties and geodetic locking at the plate interface. Corroborating analogue experiments of strain accumulation during multiple earthquake cycles, forearc deformation and uplift focus above the downdip and updip end of seismic coupling and slip and are each related to a particular stage of the seismic cycle, but with opposite trends for both domains. Similarly, barriers separating locked domains along strike appear to accumulate most upper plate faulting interseismically. Hence, locking patters are reflected in topography. From the long-term memory contained in the forearc topography the relief of the Chilean forearc seems to reflect long term stability of the observed heterogeneity of locking at the plate interface. Finally, the nature of locking at the plate interface controlling the above kinematic behavior appears to be strongly controlled by the degree of fluid overpressuring at the plate interface suggesting that the hydraulic system at the interface takes a key role for forearc response.

Soft Rock Seminar: Rattanaporn Fong-Ngern

  Start: November 24, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: November 24, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Kealie Goodwin, kealiegoodwin@utexas.edu

more →

Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellows Program - Deadline to apply is Dec. 1, 2014
Deadline to apply is Dec. 1, 2014
New Salt Tectonics Complex - Honoring Martin Jackson, raising funds towards a newly renovated Salt Tectonics Modeling Complex
Honoring Martin Jackson, raising funds towards a newly renovated Salt Tectonics Modeling Complex
Geoscience Education - Summit on Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education: Summary Report & Survey
Summit on Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education: Summary Report & Survey
GeoFORCE Challenge Match - This endowment has launched to ensure the continuation of this critical program
This endowment has launched to ensure the continuation of this critical program
Work at JSG - The Jackson School is hiring. Apply online.
The Jackson School is hiring. Apply online.
Find a Supervisor - Grad students work with over 70 scientists in 9 research disciplines
Grad students work with over 70 scientists in 9 research disciplines
 
IT Help  |  Profiles  |  UT Direct  |  Blackboard  |  Privacy Policy  |  Accessibility
© 2014 Jackson School of Geosciences, The University of Texas at Austin
Make a Gift to JSGJSG's YouTube ChannelJSG's RSS News FeedJSG's TwitterJSG's Facebook