Geochemistry/Thermo- & Geo-chronology

Researchers in this area use geochemical tracers to reconstruct the thermal history of rocks; characterize ancient environments and climates; reveal the interactions between climate, soils, and carbon dioxide (CO2) levels; and decipher fluid-rock interactions and mestasomatism at high temperature, relationships between metamorphic processes and deformation, and volatile transport in subduction zones to aid in quantifying geochemical cycles.


Our major research areas & groups in geochemistry include:

  • Major & Trace Element Geochemistry
  • Stable Isotope Geochemistry
  • Radiogenic Isotope Geochemistry
  • Aqueous & Microbial Geochemistry
  • Gas Geochemistry
  • Organic Geochemistry
  • Thermo- & Geo-chronology

We offer numerous analytical services in isotopic geochemistry to customers outside the university. For a list of services and contacts, visit: Analytical Services in Isotope Geochemistry


Geochemistry/Thermo- & Geo-chronology News

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Faculty

Jay L Banner

Jay L Banner

Isotopic methods, sustainability, groundwater, oceans, ancient oceans, climate change, aquifers, caves, environmental science, geochemistry, paleoclimatology, urbanization, environmental justice, community-engaged research
Jaime D Barnes

Jaime D Barnes

Stable isotope geochemistry, metamorphism and volatile transport in subduction zones, fluid-rock interaction and metasomatism, geochemical cycling, stable chlorine isotopes
Kenneth S Befus

Kenneth S Befus

Volcanology, igneous petrology, mineralogy, gemology
Daniel O Breecker

Daniel O Breecker

The Breecker Group studies biogeochemical processes occurring at or near the land surface. We study soils and paleosols, caves and stalagmites, and other materials, such as volcanic glass, that give us insight into ancient Earth. We study timescales ranging from seasonal cycles to hundreds of millions of years. We use ...
Richard A Ketcham

Richard A Ketcham

High-resolution X-ray computed tomography, CT scanning, 3D image analysis, fission-track dating, thermochronology, thermal history inversion, structural geology, tectonics, digital morphology, trabecular bone
John C Lassiter

John C Lassiter

Earth's origin and evolution, isotope and trace element geochemistry, the role of crust and lithospheric mantle recycling in the generation of mantle chemical heterogeneity, the origin and distribution of water and other volatile elements in the Earth's interior, and the thermal and chemical evolution of the Earth's core and core/...
Matthew A Malkowski

Matthew A Malkowski

Danny  Stockli

Danny Stockli

Thermo-/Geochronology, Tectonics and Structural Geology, Isotopic Provenance Analysis, Archeometry, Geothermal Exploration, and Thermal Maturation
Chenguang  Sun

Chenguang Sun

Deep volatile cycling; magmatic and metamorphic processes; planetary differentiation and habitability

Lecturers

Staci L Loewy

Staci L Loewy

Nathaniel R Miller

Nathaniel R Miller

Sedimentary geochemistry, isotope geochemistry, Earth system evolution, Q-ICP-MS, microanalytics, GIS, Neoproterozoic climate [link: http://www.jsg.utexas.edu/news/2018/05/new-research-suggests-that-dawn-of-plate-tectonics-could-have-turned-earth-into-snowball/]

Emeriti

Philip C Bennett

Philip C Bennett

Aqueous geochemistry, geomicrobiology, environmental and microbial geochemistry, hydrogeology
J. Richard Kyle

J. Richard Kyle

Ore deposits geology, mineral resources and society, geology and supply chains of critical materials, minerals exploration and evaluation, industrial mineral resources, origin of ore-forming fluids in sedimentary environments, fluid inclusions, stable isotopes, salt dome cap rock formation, surficial processes and earth resource formation, high resolution X-ray computed tomography applications to ...
Douglas  Smith

Douglas Smith

Research on mantle evolution using tools of mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry.

Research Scientists

Ian J Duncan

Ian J Duncan

Expertise in geomechanic and geochemistry applied to: risks associated with CO2 sequestration; hydraulic fracturing for shale gas production; environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing; and the water-energy nexus. Current research focuses on the scientific, environmental and public policy aspects of unconventional natural gas production, the water-energy nexus, and carbon capture and ...

Tingwei (Lucy) Ko

Source Rock Characterization Geochemistry (Organic, Biomarker, Gas Isotope) Mudrock Characterization Petrography, SEM
Cornelia  Rasmussen

Cornelia Rasmussen

Paleoecology, geobiology, geochemistry, geochronology, sedimentology

Research Staff

Staci L Loewy

Staci L Loewy

Nathaniel R Miller

Nathaniel R Miller

Sedimentary geochemistry, isotope geochemistry, Earth system evolution, Q-ICP-MS, microanalytics, GIS, Neoproterozoic climate [link: http://www.jsg.utexas.edu/news/2018/05/new-research-suggests-that-dawn-of-plate-tectonics-could-have-turned-earth-into-snowball/]
Lisa D Stockli

Lisa D Stockli

U-Pb Geochronology and trace element analysis by LA-ICP-MS; TIMS and SIMS techniques
Lijing  Yao

Lijing Yao


Graduate Students

August R Aalto

August R Aalto

Sophia Bautista

Sophia Bautista is a PhD student in the Shanahan Lab. Her doctoral research aims to better understand drivers of southern hemisphere hydroclimate over the past glacial-interglacial cycle. She uses geochemical proxies, such as br-GDGTs as a paleotemperature indicators and hydrogen isotopes of leaf waxes as a proxy for precipitation. Her ...
Sarah  Brooker

Sarah Brooker

I am a second-year Ph.D. student in the stable isotope group at UT Austin. My primary research interests are using stable isotope systems, both traditional and non-traditional, to understand high-temperature fluid-rock reactions in igneous systems.
Ethan M Conrad

Ethan M Conrad

I am a PhD candidate at the University of Texas Jackson School of Geosciences (Institute for Geophysics, UTIG & Department of Geological Sciences, DGS) advised by Profs. Claudio Faccenna (Formerly UT & Roma TRE, now GFZ Potsdam & Roma TRE), Thorsten Becker (UT - JSG: DGS & UTIG), and Daniel Stockli (UT - JSG: ...
Max Ehrenfels

Max Ehrenfels

The aim of my research is to improve established methods and develop new methods to extract thermal history information using the (U-Th)/He decay system in zircon. An initial project will produce new mineral standards to overcome analytical shortcomings in the currently used laser ablation (U-Th)/He protocol. This will ...
Nicole  Ferrie

Nicole Ferrie

Nicole Ferrie is a Ph.D. student interested in utilizing geochemical behavior to research seismologic processes and paleoclimate reconstruction. Her research focuses on using boron adsorption and isotopic fractionation (1) as a fluid tracer in shallow subduction complexes and (2) as a proxy for paleoatmospheric CO2 reconstruction in paleosols. Nicole performs experimental ...

Stephanie R Forstner

Structural geology Fluid inclusion petrography & microthermometry Geochemical fluid-rock interactions Diagenesis

Hector K Garza

Hoss Hostettler

Scarlette  Hsia

Scarlette Hsia

My PhD Research is focused on constraining the timing and amplitude of Marine Isotope Stage 5a deposits across the Western Atlantic Ocean. My primary interests include carbonate facies mapping, sedimentology, paleo-sea level reconstruction, stratigraphy, and STEM outreach. I am an English as a Second Language (ESL) and first generation PhD ...
Alexander  Janelle

Alexander Janelle

I am a Ph.D. student with experience studying chemical and physical processes in karst aquifers through downstream riparian and coastal ecosystems. I am interested in using speleothem paleoenvironmental proxies to better understand how past climate changed during the last deglaciation and predict future water availability in central Texas.

Natthakorn Konguthaithip

Joshua Malone

Joshua Malone

PhD candidate at the University of Texas at Austin studying deep-water carbonate depositional systems within the Pennsylvanian Bird Spring Formation in east-central California. My research integrates field-based sedimentologic/stratigraphic observations, 3D outcrop modeling, and provenance datasets (detrital zircon geochronology, petrography, and heavy mineral analysis) in order to understand how external ...

Nicholas J Montiel

Joshua  Munro

Joshua Munro

Understanding the effects of subduction on the O-H-Mg-Ca-Zn isotope composition of the downgoing slab, focusing on the Farallon Plate, North America
Claudiu  Nistor

Claudiu Nistor

Liam Norris

Liam Norris is a PhD student at the Jackson School of Geosciences. He has a B.S. in Geology with a specialization in biology from Texas A&M University, where he also conducted research on Pennsylvanian seed ferns preserved in coal balls. Liams research interests are based around paleoecology, ...
Fernando  Rey

Fernando Rey

My research focus is to link the stratigraphic record with tectonic processes using geochronology and geochemical signatures. I am currently working on projects in southern Patagonia (Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous Rocas Verdes Back-arc basin) and Japan (Neogene opening of the Sea of Japan).I am also interested in the dispersal of ...

George H Segee-Wright

I am a mantle geochemist with a focus on volatile element cycling between Earth's surface and mantle. I am interested in combining radiogenic and stable isotope measurements to better constrain lithospheric recycling into the mantle. My current research focuses on using halogen abundances and chlorine isotopes to trace subducted volatile ...
Victoria L Todd

Victoria L Todd

General Theory

GEO 376C/388L Isotope Geology (taught each Fall by Ketcham & Barnes)

Survey of stable and radiogenic isotopes and their use. This broad course can either be a full introduction to the subject for students whose research will overlap with geochemistry but will not be specializing in it, or a springboard for further study.
GEO 390M Thermodynamics of Geologic Processes(Taught every other fall (even years) by Carlson)

Introduction to general thermodynamics, with emphasis on geochemical aspects.

Analytical

GEO 390S Analytical Methods: Mass Spectrometry (taught each Spring by Miller & Loewy)

Survey course of 5 mass spec techniques (TIMS, ICP-MS, LA-ICP-MS, MC-ICP-MS, IRMS), and their applications.
GEO 391 Fundamentals and Applications of ICP-MS (taught each Fall by Miller)

Fundamentals of ICP-MS, applications and capabilites; hands-on (50-50 lecture/lab).
GEO 390R Analytical Methods: Electron-Microbeam Techniques (taught each Fall by Zhao)

Microprobe course, plus additional e-beam techniques such as SEM and XRD.

Applied

GEO 391 Geochronology (taught each Spring by Stockli)

Geochronology and applications.
GEO 391 Thermochronology (taught Fall by Stockli & Ketcham)

Thermochronology and applications.
GEO 388R Advanced Thermochronology (taught every other Spring (even years) by Stockli & Ketcham)

Current topics in thermochronology, and computational modeling.
GEO 376E/388H Environmental Isotope Geochemistry (taught every other Spring by Breeker)

Theory of stable isotope fractionation and radiogenic isotope systematics, applied to problems in low-T geochemistry.
GEO 371C/388G Global Biogeochemical Cycles (taught Fall (failed to meet previous 2 years) by Shanahan)

Chemistry of surface of Earth, focusing on biochemical processes and interactions with the global climate system.
GEO 391 Paleoclimate (taught by Shanahan)

Introduce grad students to field of paleoclimatology, using geologic archives from ocean, land, and cryosphere.
GEO 387C/476M Chemical Hydrogeology (taught Spring by Bennett)

Chemistry of water in the subsurface. Topics include basic thermodynamics and kinetics of rock-water interaction, acid-base theory, redox, and coordination chemistry.
GEO 386K Igneous Petrology (taught every other Spring by Gardner)

Geochemistry of magmas, geochemical and thermodynamic modelling, MELTS.
GEO 386K Metamorphic Petrology (taught every other Spring (odd years) by Carlson)

Survey course in metamorphic petrology.
GEO 391 Meteoritics/Early Solar System Processes (taught every other Fall by Lassiter)

Survey course in metamorphic petrology.
GEO 376T/388T High-Temperature Geochemistry (taught every other Fall by Lassiter)

Isotope and trace element geochemistry. Emphasis on origin and evolution of Earth interior.
GEO 386E Economic Geology (taught every other year (next F13) by Kyle)

Overview of the geologic controls for the formation of and economic constraints affecting non-fuel mineral resources.
GEO 381R Regional Studies in Mineral Resources Geology (taught every spring, per demand (next S14), taught by Kyle)

Integrated study of a major geologic province, in the context of mineral resources; international field trip course.

Suggested Course Sequences

Graduate and undergraduate research in geologic sequestration of CO2

Graduate
Gulf Coast Carbon Center supports a team of students and post docs working in geologic sequestration (deep subsurface long-duration storage) of the major greenhouse gas CO2, as a method to reduce release to the atmosphere. Student projects are wide ranging, from sedimentology to policy, linked in that they are 1) multidisciplinary and 2) applied to current issues. Students are typically jointly supervised by faculty in geology or petroleum geosystems engineering and staff at the GCCC. A class in geologic sequestration is offered in the fall some years.
Posted by: Susan Hovorka

Innovative Detrital Provenance Studies - Double Dating PLUS

Graduate
A major thrust of my current research the development and application of more comprehensive isotopic detrital provenance tools. U-Pb on zircon is clearly the big work horse, but only goes so far and sometimes yields "no" useful info, e.g., if the source of the sediment is mostly recycled sediment. We have extensively pursued double dating of zircons by U-Pb and He, as zircon He ages yield very interesting insights into the thermal and tectonic history of the source terrane; often yielding very different insights than crystallization ages. The combination is powerful, but I think we can take things so much farther by combining double dating with other constrains. People have tried fission track (not precise enough), Hf/Hf (to get mantle separation model ages), etc., but what we want to do and are working on is really Double Dating ++, combining zircon U-Pb-He dating with a variety of other geochemical aspects to more comprehensive understand detrital provenance and improve paleo-tectonic reconstructions. For example, trace-element thermometry (Ti in zirc), REE on zircon (met vs mag origin), Hf/Hf (see above), oxygen isotopes, etc. and also to develop rutile in an analogous manner (e.g., Zr in rut thermometry, Cr/Nb ratio (mafic vs granulitic), REE, etc.). The sky is the limit and what can learn so much. The issue in part it, how much can a single grain tell us before it's gone? The project sounds very laboratory oriented, but it's really a combination of field and lab work. We have identified a few possible case study areas, e.g., Morocco; great exposures, long-lived and preserved record of basin deposition since the Precambrian. My group is already working on some case studies in NW Himalayas, the N & S Pyrenees, the Sevier FTB, Permian Basin and other foreland basin. New projects include provenance studies along rifted and passive continental margins such the Gulf of Mexico, the central Atlantic Margins in Canada, USA, Portugal, and Morocco.
Posted by: Daniel Stockli

Research in structural geology and diagenesis

Graduate
Fundamental and applied research on fractures, particularly as these studies apply to petroleum reservoirs, is conducted under the auspices of the Fracture Research and Application Consortium at The University of Texas at Austin. The academic program of research, mentoring and teaching is led by staff of the Bureau of Economic Geology, the Department of Petroleum & Geosystems Engineering and the Department of Geological Sciences. Students in the Energy & Earth Resources Graduate Program also participate in FRAC sponsored research projects. For further information on opportunities for fracture studies within the program see the FRAC pages on opportunities in Geology, Petroleum Engineering, Geophysics, and Energy Economics. FRAC welcomes Visiting Scientists from industry and from other academic institutions. Contact Steve Laubach for more information about these opportunities. A key part of the FRAC academic program is the Structural Diagenesis Initiative, a new teaching and mentoring perspective on interacting mechanical and chemical processes at high crustal levels in the Earth. For more information on the initiative see the Structural Diagenesis Initiative web site. If you are a prospective student, please see the admissions information on the Petroleum & Geosystems Engineering or Jackson School of Geosciences web sites.
Posted by: Stephen Laubach

Laser ablation (U-Th)/He and 4He/3He dating of zircon and apatite

Graduate
Seeking motivated Ph.D. students interested in noble gas geo-thermochronology and geochemistry to pursue project in method development and application of laser ablation (U-Th)/He dating and depth profile 4He/3He thermochronometry of zircon and apatite. Our laboratory has a dedicated noble gas extraction line with a SFT magnetic sector noble gas mass spectrometer and dedicated Excimer Laser. The lab also houses two Element2 magnetic sector single collector ICP-MS instruments with a second Excimer laser as well as a state-of-the-art Bruker optical interferometric microscope. The project will develop laser ablation methodology to recover detailed thermal histories from apatite and zircon by laser ablation (U-Th)/He and 4He/3He dating as well as comparison to step-heating fractional loss experiments.
Posted by: Daniel Stockli

LA-ICP-MS single-pule U-Pb depth profiling recovery of thermal histories

Graduate
Seeking motivated Ph.D. students interested in in-situ geochronology to pursue project in method development and application of laser ablation continuous mode or single-pulse U-Pb LA-ICP-MS geo-thermochronology as well as trace element speedometry to constrain thermal history or lower and middle crustal rocks. The UTChron Geo- and Thermochronometry laboratory houses two Element2 magnetic sector single collector ICP-MS instruments with a large-volume cell Excimer laser system, ideally suited for depth profiling and U-Pb and trace element split stream analysis. The laboratory also houses a Bruker optical interferometric microscope to control laser ablation rates as well as a Raman system. The focus of applications is on method development and application to the exhumation of middle and lower crustal rocks in rifted margin settings.
Posted by: Daniel Stockli

Hydrogeochemical investigations in urban riparian zones

Graduate
Hydrogeochemical investigations in urban riparian zones
Posted by: Darrel Tremaine

Speleothems and cave monitoring

Graduate
Speleothems and cave monitoring
Posted by: Darrel Tremaine

Dendrochronology and dendrochemistry

Graduate
Dendrochronology and dendrochemistry
Posted by: Darrel Tremaine

Sustainable Urban Systems

Graduate
Sustainable Urban Systems
Posted by: Darrel Tremaine

Electromechanical instrumentation design

Graduate
Electromechanical instrumentation design
Posted by: Darrel Tremaine

PhD/MS opportunities

Graduate
My group welcomes new students with strong motivations on understanding how solid Earth and planets operate and its impacts on shaping habitable surface environments. Prospective students are expected to have a STEM background. If these describe you, feel free to contact me through email for position openings in my group.
Posted by: Chenguang Sun

Stable isotopes as hydroclimatic indicators

Undergraduate
I am looking for an undergraduate student researcher to work on the analysis of stable isotopes in natural waters and plant materials. No experience necessary. The student researcher will be trained in extracting water samples on a vacuum system and analysis of stable isotopes using a laser spectrometer. Depending on progress, there may be opportunities to publish this research
Posted by: Timothy Shanahan

Paleoclimate reconstructions in the southern Rocky Mountains

Undergraduate
I am looking for one or more undergraduate student researchers to work on paleoclimate reconstructions in the southern Rockies using geochemical indicators in lake sediments. No experience necessary. Depending on progress, there will be opportunities to publish.
Posted by: Timothy Shanahan

Ph.D. Project Greece - Petrochronology and tectonic evolution of the Cycladic Blueschist Complex (University of Texas at Austin)

Graduate - 4-5 years
Ph.D. project available in the Stockli Research Group and UTChron Laboratory of the Dept of Earth and Planetary Sciences (https://eps.jsg.utexas.edu/) at the Jackson School of Geosciences (https://www.jsg.utexas.edu/) of The University of Texas at Austin. The project focuses on the tectonic and metamorphic evolution of the Cycladic Blueschist Complex in central and northern Greece to constrain the tectonic and metamorphic evolution of one of the world's best-exposed subduction complexes. The project entails field mapping and structural analysis with strong emphasis on accessory mineral (zircon, apatite, titanite) LA-ICP-MS petrochronology, microanalytical mineral imaging and elemental and isotopic mapping, and low-temperature (U-Th)/He thermochronometry of the Cycladic Blueschist Complex in central and north-eastern Greece with the goal of constraining the pre-subduction, subduction, and exhumation history of Cycladic blueschists and understanding subduction underplating within the Hellenic subduction complex. The project is a collaboration with the University of Athens (Prof. Soukis) and we are seek an outstanding, motivated, and independent PhD student with interested in combining field and cutting-edge laboratory work. Interested candidates should contact Dr. Daniel Stockli with any inquiries and questions regarding the project or application procedures. For more information regarding the Stockli Research Group (https://www.jsg.utexas.edu/stockli-group/), the UTChron Laboratory (https://www.jsg.utexas.edu/utchron-lab/) please see these website links. Applications are due January 1, 2024, and information about applying to our program is online using the online application from the Graduate School of the University of Texas at Austin. Applications must be complete in the Graduate and International Admissions Center (GIAC) by the appropriate deadline. ALL ITEMS must be received by the deadline. We no longer require submission of a GRE score for the application for the Fall of 2024, however, international applicants do require submission of TOEFL scores. For general admissions questions, please see https://www.jsg.utexas.edu/education/graduate/admissions/ The University of Texas at Austin is one of the most diverse campuses in the nation. With nearly 52,000 students from all 50 states and 123 countries, we take seriously our motto: What Starts Here Changes the World. We boast 18 colleges and schools with over 300 degree programs, representing a diversity of thought and scholarship that is staggering. The Dept. of Geological Sciences at UT seeks to foster an environment where faculty, students, and staff feel valued and welcome.
Posted by: Daniel Stockli

Urbanization and water resources (NSF Hydrologic Sciences Program)

Graduate
Our group studies the impacts of urbanization on hydrologic systems using geochemical, field, laboratory, and modeling methods. New opportunities for graduate research in this area are available for students applying for Fall admission. Contact Jay Banner at banner@jsg.utexas.edu.
Posted by: Jay Banner

Paleoclimate reconstructions and modern hydrology of karst systems (NSF Paleo Perspectives on Climate Change Program)

Graduate
Our group reconstructs regional climate change in response to global change using speleothems and tree rings. These studies are advanced by analysis of modern karst hydrologic systems in which the speleothems are found. New opportunities for graduate research in this area are available for students applying for Fall admission. Contact Jay Banner at banner@jsg.utexas.edu.
Posted by: Jay Banner

NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates

Undergraduate
This summer program trains and supports undergraduates to undertake environmental science research. Details may be found at https://www.esi.utexas.edu/education/summer-research-experience-for-undergraduates-reu/.
Posted by: Jay Banner

NSF Research Experiences for Undergraduates

Undergraduate
This summer program trains and supports undergraduates to undertake environmental science research. Details may be found at https://www.esi.utexas.edu/education/summer-research-experience-for-undergraduates-reu/.
Posted by: Jay Banner

CRESSLE: Community Resilience integrated into an Earth System Science Learning Ecosystem (NSF Cultural Transformation of the Geoscience Community Program)

Graduate
CRESSLE represents an emerging approach to environmental resilience that emphasizes bidirectional learning between universities and communities. These teams will comprise a 'Community of Practice' to design and implement research projects addressing community challenges and Environmental Justice in three themes: Water Resources, Climate Resilience, and Communities & Landscapes.
Posted by: Jay Banner

Graduate opportunities at OCEEMlab

Graduate - Five years
OCEEMlab welcomes future graduate students of high caliber who are passionate about exploring new frontiers in Ocean and Earth science. At OCEEMlab, we study lithosphere-biosphere dynamic processes and complex systems using a combination of fieldwork, advanced computational modeling, and integrative data science. We seek candidates with solid foundations in natural sciences and programming skills. We are especially interested in bringing on board individuals with interdisciplinary knowledge who are highly motivated in weaving disciplines such as geophysics, geology, oceanography, geochemistry, and environmental molecular biology to address contemporary challenging research questions. Most importantly, in the core values of OCEEMlab lies courtesy to one another, encouraging natural curiosity, and cohesive teamwork; As a team, we can achieve far more than individuals. In addition, we firmly believe that groundbreaking discoveries are accomplished by walking on the fringes of science rather than at the center. Thus, we encourage unorthodox genuine thinkers to join our team and help us stretch the envelope of human knowledge a tiny bit further.
Posted by: Eric Attias

Postdocs opportunities at OCEEMlab

Graduate - Two years
OCEEMlab welcomes applicants via UTIG's Distinguished Postdoctoral Fellows Program. At OCEEMlab, we study lithosphere-biosphere dynamic processes and complex systems using a combination of fieldwork, advanced computational modeling, and integrative data science. We are especially interested in bringing on board individuals with interdisciplinary knowledge who are highly motivated in weaving disciplines such as geophysics, geology, oceanography, geochemistry, and environmental molecular biology to address contemporary challenging research questions. Contact Dr. Attias for further information.
Posted by: Eric Attias

Geomechanics and Geofluids Research Jobs for Undergrads

Undergraduate
Do you want to study the Earth while learning the ins-and-outs of cutting-edge laboratory equipment, from maintenance to experiment design? UT GeoMechanics and GeoFluids investigates fluid flow and deformation in Earth materials using lab experiments, field work, and computer modeling. We seek hard-working and detail-oriented students with a passion for learning. You will assist with ongoing projects: offshoots could lead to your senior thesis. Tasks will include everything from the routine to the experimentally complex. You will work independently or with staff and researchers on experimental setup, equipment maintenance, laboratory clean up, sample preparation, data analysis, and a host of other tasks. For more information contact Josh O'Connell. Learn more about our research projects at UT GeoMechanics and GeoFluids.
Posted by: Peter Flemings

Center for Planetary Systems Habitability

The Center for Planetary Systems Habitability is an interdisciplinary research center at UT and is the result of a partnership between the Jackson School, the College of Natural Sciences, and the Cockrell School of Engineering. The center advances our ability to search for life on other planets by collaborating on research that helps better understand where habitable zones develop and how they evolve within planetary systems.

Affiliated UT Programs & Centers

Environmental Science Institute

The Environmental Science Institute is a multi-disciplinary institute for basic scientific research in environmental studies founded by The University of Texas at Austin. The Institute serves as a focal point on campus for a wide scope of interdisciplinary research and teaching involving the complex interactions of the biosphere, hydrosphere, and lithosphere in the Earth system, as well as the human dimensions of these interactions.