Research addresses the structural evolution of reservoirs, the effects of folds, faults, and fractures on fluid flow properties, fluid storage, migration, and production, the interaction of brittle deformation, sediment compaction, and chemical change, and the mechanics of reservoir deformation on all scales. This research is of relevance to oil & gas exploration and production, development of geothermal resources, and geologic carbon sequestration.

Faculty & Research Scientists


Peter  EichhublPeter Eichhubl
Fault and fracture mechanics, diagenesis and low-temp. geochemistry, fluid flow and transfer processes in sedimentary basins, deformation mechanisms of the upper crust, structural control of mass and heat transfer in sedimentary basins, effects of chemical mass transfer on the mechanical and hydraulic behavior of fractures and faults, chemical interaction between fluids and minerals
Julia F GaleJulia F Gale
Natural fracture / vein systems in sedimentary and metamorphic rocks; structural geology; tectonics
Seyyed Abolfazl HosseiniSeyyed Abolfazl Hosseini
Research interests are mainly topics related to fluid transport in porous media. Current research includes: Enhanced Oil Recovery - Enhanced Gas Recovery - Upscaling and Upgridding - Above Zone Monitoring Interval - Reservoir Simulation and History Matching - Unconventional Reservoirs
Michael R HudecMichael R Hudec
Salt tectonics, 3-D computer modeling, kinematic models for evolution and growth of salt structures, structural geology, cross-section restoration and balancing, seismic interpretation
Stephen E LaubachStephen E Laubach
Structural diagenesis, structural geology, fracture analysis, fluid inclusion and cathodoluminescence studies, rock mechanics, mechanical and fracture stratigraphy, hydrocarbon exploration and development in deep and/or structurally complex areas, tight gas sandstone, coalbed methane, shale gas; geologic aspects of hydraulic fracturing, application of borehole-imaging geophysical logs to stress and fracture evaluation, structural evolution of North American Cordillera, fracture history of NW Scotland, regional fracture studies Argentina.
Nicola  TisatoNicola Tisato
Are rocks elastic? Not really... especially when saturated with multi-phase fluids. Did you know that a seismic wave is able of mobilizing the liquid saturating rocks and that such a process reduces the seismic wave strength? Yes, this phenomenon, called Wave-Induced-Fluid-Flow could be used to improve subsurface imaging. How? The absorption of elastic energy varies with frequency, this means that certain frequencies are attenuated and other maybe not. Why is this important? Well, adding information ...

Postdoctoral Researchers


Athma R BhandariAthma R Bhandari
Xinming  WuXinming Wu
3D seismic interpretation, image processing, subsurface modeling, seismic stratigraphy, inversion problems......