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Researchers with The University of Texas at Austin have found that incorporating snow data collected from space into computer climate models can significantly improve seasonal temperature predictions. The findings, published in November in Geophysical Research Letters, a publication of the American...

DEC
09

UTIG Special Seminar: Tom Jordan, British Antarctic Survey
10:30 AM

UTIG Special Seminar: Tom Jordan, British Antarctic Survey

  Start: December 9, 2016 at 10:30 am     End: December 9, 2016 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC ROC Room 1.603
 Contact:Ian Dalziel, ian@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0431
 URL:Event Link
Mapping the hidden mosaic of Antarctica; From microplate movement to continental assembly

Due to the blanketing ice sheet and remote location Antarctic is one of the least explored and poorly understood regions on our planet. The key geological division of Antarctica is between an ancient East Antarctica craton, once at the heart of the Gondwanan supercontinent, and the collage of fragments making up the tectonically more active West Antarctic province. Within West Antarctica geological studies suggest that as a pre-cursor to the breakup of Gondwana one of these fragments, the Haag Ellsworth Whitmore Mountains block, was translated 1500 km and rotated through 90° from a position between East Antarctica and South Africa. Geophysical data has been used to challenge this notion, and suggest little or no block motion. Here we use new regional compilations and analysis of magnetic and gravity data to discuss the feasibility and implications of an alternative tectonic model with significant (500 km) movement, but limited (30°) block rotation. In contrast to West Antarctica the East Antarctic craton has been seen as a monolithic block, split by simple linear geological boundaries extrapolated from sparse coastal outcrops. However, the most up to date geophysical data from the PolarGAP survey around the South Pole supports an alternative view that East Antarctica is also a composite structure, with a complex of sutures and boundaries resulting from continental assembly, which continue to influence the sub-ice topography to this day.

DEC
14

Alumni Reception in San Francisco in conjunction with AGU Meeting
12:00 PM

UTIG Special Seminar: Tom Jordan, British Antarctic Survey

  Start: December 9, 2016 at 10:30 am     End: December 9, 2016 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC ROC Room 1.603
 Contact:Ian Dalziel, ian@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0431
 URL:Event Link
Mapping the hidden mosaic of Antarctica; From microplate movement to continental assembly

Due to the blanketing ice sheet and remote location Antarctic is one of the least explored and poorly understood regions on our planet. The key geological division of Antarctica is between an ancient East Antarctica craton, once at the heart of the Gondwanan supercontinent, and the collage of fragments making up the tectonically more active West Antarctic province. Within West Antarctica geological studies suggest that as a pre-cursor to the breakup of Gondwana one of these fragments, the Haag Ellsworth Whitmore Mountains block, was translated 1500 km and rotated through 90° from a position between East Antarctica and South Africa. Geophysical data has been used to challenge this notion, and suggest little or no block motion. Here we use new regional compilations and analysis of magnetic and gravity data to discuss the feasibility and implications of an alternative tectonic model with significant (500 km) movement, but limited (30°) block rotation. In contrast to West Antarctica the East Antarctic craton has been seen as a monolithic block, split by simple linear geological boundaries extrapolated from sparse coastal outcrops. However, the most up to date geophysical data from the PolarGAP survey around the South Pole supports an alternative view that East Antarctica is also a composite structure, with a complex of sutures and boundaries resulting from continental assembly, which continue to influence the sub-ice topography to this day.

Alumni Reception in San Francisco in conjunction with AGU Meeting

  Start: December 14, 2016 at 12:00 pm     End: December 14, 2016 at 2:00 am
 Location:ThristyBear Brewing Company, 661 Howard St. in San Francisco
 Contact:Kristen Tucek, ktucek@jsg.utexas.edu, 512.471.2223

JAN
26

De Ford Lecture Series: Leif Karlstrom
4:00 PM

UTIG Special Seminar: Tom Jordan, British Antarctic Survey

  Start: December 9, 2016 at 10:30 am     End: December 9, 2016 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC ROC Room 1.603
 Contact:Ian Dalziel, ian@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0431
 URL:Event Link
Mapping the hidden mosaic of Antarctica; From microplate movement to continental assembly

Due to the blanketing ice sheet and remote location Antarctic is one of the least explored and poorly understood regions on our planet. The key geological division of Antarctica is between an ancient East Antarctica craton, once at the heart of the Gondwanan supercontinent, and the collage of fragments making up the tectonically more active West Antarctic province. Within West Antarctica geological studies suggest that as a pre-cursor to the breakup of Gondwana one of these fragments, the Haag Ellsworth Whitmore Mountains block, was translated 1500 km and rotated through 90° from a position between East Antarctica and South Africa. Geophysical data has been used to challenge this notion, and suggest little or no block motion. Here we use new regional compilations and analysis of magnetic and gravity data to discuss the feasibility and implications of an alternative tectonic model with significant (500 km) movement, but limited (30°) block rotation. In contrast to West Antarctica the East Antarctic craton has been seen as a monolithic block, split by simple linear geological boundaries extrapolated from sparse coastal outcrops. However, the most up to date geophysical data from the PolarGAP survey around the South Pole supports an alternative view that East Antarctica is also a composite structure, with a complex of sutures and boundaries resulting from continental assembly, which continue to influence the sub-ice topography to this day.

Alumni Reception in San Francisco in conjunction with AGU Meeting

  Start: December 14, 2016 at 12:00 pm     End: December 14, 2016 at 2:00 am
 Location:ThristyBear Brewing Company, 661 Howard St. in San Francisco
 Contact:Kristen Tucek, ktucek@jsg.utexas.edu, 512.471.2223

De Ford Lecture Series: Leif Karlstrom

  Start: January 26, 2017 at 4:00 pm     End: January 26, 2017 at 5:00 pm
 Location:JGB2.324

FEB
02

De Ford Lecture Series: Christian Schoof
4:00 PM

UTIG Special Seminar: Tom Jordan, British Antarctic Survey

  Start: December 9, 2016 at 10:30 am     End: December 9, 2016 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC ROC Room 1.603
 Contact:Ian Dalziel, ian@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0431
 URL:Event Link
Mapping the hidden mosaic of Antarctica; From microplate movement to continental assembly

Due to the blanketing ice sheet and remote location Antarctic is one of the least explored and poorly understood regions on our planet. The key geological division of Antarctica is between an ancient East Antarctica craton, once at the heart of the Gondwanan supercontinent, and the collage of fragments making up the tectonically more active West Antarctic province. Within West Antarctica geological studies suggest that as a pre-cursor to the breakup of Gondwana one of these fragments, the Haag Ellsworth Whitmore Mountains block, was translated 1500 km and rotated through 90° from a position between East Antarctica and South Africa. Geophysical data has been used to challenge this notion, and suggest little or no block motion. Here we use new regional compilations and analysis of magnetic and gravity data to discuss the feasibility and implications of an alternative tectonic model with significant (500 km) movement, but limited (30°) block rotation. In contrast to West Antarctica the East Antarctic craton has been seen as a monolithic block, split by simple linear geological boundaries extrapolated from sparse coastal outcrops. However, the most up to date geophysical data from the PolarGAP survey around the South Pole supports an alternative view that East Antarctica is also a composite structure, with a complex of sutures and boundaries resulting from continental assembly, which continue to influence the sub-ice topography to this day.

Alumni Reception in San Francisco in conjunction with AGU Meeting

  Start: December 14, 2016 at 12:00 pm     End: December 14, 2016 at 2:00 am
 Location:ThristyBear Brewing Company, 661 Howard St. in San Francisco
 Contact:Kristen Tucek, ktucek@jsg.utexas.edu, 512.471.2223

De Ford Lecture Series: Leif Karlstrom

  Start: January 26, 2017 at 4:00 pm     End: January 26, 2017 at 5:00 pm
 Location:JGB2.324

De Ford Lecture Series: Christian Schoof

  Start: February 2, 2017 at 4:00 pm     End: February 2, 2017 at 5:00 pm
 Location:JGB2.324

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Tailgates, reunions and continuing education with your fellow alums.
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Honoring Martin Jackson, raising funds towards a newly renovated Salt Tectonics Modeling Complex.
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Summit on Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education: Survey
Find a Career - Whether you're launching a career or hitting the reset button, we can help.
Whether you're launching a career or hitting the reset button, we can help.
Work at JSG - The Jackson School is hiring. Apply online.
The Jackson School is hiring. Apply online.
Find a Supervisor - Grad students work with over 70 scientists in 9 research disciplines.
Grad students work with over 70 scientists in 9 research disciplines.
 
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