Dr. Tip Meckel

Dr. Tip Meckel
Senior Research Scientist, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences

Office: BEG
Mailcode: E0620

Dr. Tip Meckel is a senior research scientist investigating geologic carbon storage for the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin. During his 15 years with the Gulf Coast Carbon Center at the Bureau he has led research focusing on geologic characterization, structural geology, monitoring design, and pressure evolution for CO2 injections.

He has been directly involved with many large-scale field demonstration projects funded through the DOE-NETL Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships. He currently leads the research initiative to identify offshore sequestration potential in the Gulf of Mexico with focus on capacity assessment and high-resolution 3D marine seismic monitoring technologies.

He was a contributor to the 2019 National Petroleum Council study on CCUS, and participated in the formation of the Society of Petroleum Engineer’s Storage Resource Management System (SRMS).

PhD - UT Austin, 2003
MS - Univ. MT, 1998
BA - Colby College, 1995

Areas of Expertise

Stratigraphy, structural geology, CO2 sequestration, carbon capture and storage, CCS, high-resolution 3D seismic imaging /link http://www.beg.utexas.edu/gccc


Research Locations



Current Research Programs & Projects

Evaluating carbon dioxide storage potential in the Gulf of Mexico ( view )

Laboratory Sand Tank Experiments of Engineered Clastic Media with Fluid Flow Visualization


JSG Outstanding Educator Award - Jackson School of Geosciences (2018 - 2018)

Director. Acquisition, processing and interpretation of novel HR3D datasets for investigation of overburden structure and fluid flow processes - High-Resolution 3D seismic (P-Cable) Center (2011 - 2016)

Project PI - Offshore CO2 Storage Resource Assessment of the Northern Gulf of Mexico - DOE-NETL (2009 - 2021)

Fulltime Researcher on geologic aspects of carbon capture and storage - Gulf Coast Carbon Center (2006 - 2016)

Postdocs

Hailun Ni

Luca Trevisan, 2015 - 2017


Graduate Students

Izaak Ruiz , M.S., expected 2019 (Supervisor)

Kerstan J Wallace , M.S., expected 2013 (Supervisor)

Julie N Ditkof , M.S., expected 2013 (Supervisor)

Erin N Miller , M.S., expected 2012 (Supervisor)

Johnathon Osmond (Supervisor)
I conduct structural interpretation and analysis using outcrop, seismic, and well data to better understand the structural architecture of Texas basins for seismicity research. Research Interests: - Crustal deformation, particularly brittle processes - Geometry of structural hydrocarbon traps and the sealing capability faults - Geophysical techniques in support of structure, tectonic, and petroleum studies - Geologic field methods and geophysical data acquisition

Emily C Beckham (Supervisor)

Harry L Hull (Supervisor)

John Franey (Supervisor)
John Franey is a Graduate Researcher at the Gulf Coast Carbon Commission at the Bureau of Economic Geology. John is working towards developing a high order stratigraphic framework for intraslope subbasins in Miocene deposits offshore of the modern Texas Coast. These findings will be used to aid in risking and assessment of potential carbon sequestration sites.

Andrew Nicholson, M.S., 2012 (Supervisor)
JSG - UT Austin


YearSemesterCourse
2017Fall GEO 394 Rsch In Geological Sciences
2017Spring GEO 420K Intro To Field And Strat Meths
2017Spring GEO 394 Rsch In Geological Sciences
2016Fall GEO 394 Rsch In Geological Sciences

Gulf Coast Carbon Center

Offshore Miocene CO2 storage assessment
The Texas Offshore Miocene Project is a substantial 5-year effort undertaken by the Gulf Coast Carbon Center at the Bureau of Economic Geology to investigate the regional geologic potential of Miocene-age rocks of Texas State Submerged Lands to store CO2 for geologically significant periods of time. Such geologic storage provides current and future emitting industries with a viable environmental alternative to the current practice of atmospheric release. The results of this study should provide the next step in making permanent geologic storage of CO2 a commercial reality.