Researcher Profile

Jackson School of Geosciences

Elizabeth J Catlos

Elizabeth J Catlos
Associate Professor, Department of Geological Sciences, Jackson School of Geosciences

Email: ejcatlos@gmail.com
Work: +1 512 471 4762
Office: JGB 3.320B
Mailcode: C9000
Curriculum Vitae (pdf)
Publications

Elizabeth Catlos joined the Dept. of Geological Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin as an Associate Professor in 2009. Before her appointment at UT, Catlos was at Oklahoma State University, where she had been on the faculty since 2001. She was a UT Austin Harrington Fellow from 2007-2008, and spent 2008-2009 academic year as a Fulbright Scholar in the Dept. Geological Engineering at Middle East Technical University in Ankara, Turkey. In the summer of 2015, she was a visiting faculty member at the University of California, Los Angeles, and will spend part of Fall 2017 as a Max Kade Distinguished Visiting Professor at Heidelberg University, Germany.

Catlos' research interests are in developing and applying petrochemical and geochemical techniques to the study of lithosphere dynamics. She uses geochemical and geochronological data to develop and constrain models for heat, mass, and fluid flow along major fault systems. She is interested in applying new approaches in mineral equilibria to estimate environmental conditions during dynamic recrystallization. Also, she specializes in accessory mineral geochronology and developing techniques for isotopic microanalysis. She has published widely about how fault systems operate in the Himalayas and Turkey, and how mineral ages time major events that occurred in the past. She has journal publications in Science, PloSOne, International Geology Reviews, Journal of Structural Geology, Resources, American Journal of Science, American Mineralogist, among others. She has received funding for her research from the National Science Foundation's International and Tectonics Divisions.

Catlos has received multiple awards for her research, service, and teaching, including the Geological Society of America's Young Scientist Award (Donath Medal), the Carolyn G. and G. Moses Knebel Teaching Award for Introductory Course (GEO401), the Texas Exes Teaching Award, Outstanding Reviewer for Earth and Planetary Science Letters and Outstanding Reviewer for Geological Society of America Bulletin. She is a Fellow of the Geological Society of America.

Catlos was elected to the governing council of the Geological Society of America from 2013 to 2017 and was Program Chair for the South Central Section Meeting of the society in Austin in 2013. In her role as a councilor, she was involved in setting policy in a variety of areas, including publications, diversity, and public policy. She was the society's liaison to its Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Petrology, Volcanology Division, Structural Geology and Tectonics Division, and Student Advisory Council. She also served as a Councilor for the Diversity in the Geosciences Committee and the Doris M. Curtis Memorial Fund for Women in Science Committee. She has served on numerous awards committees for the society.

In addition to her service to the GSA, Catlos has been an ad hoc reviewer for numerous publications and funding agencies. She is on the Editorial Board for the journals Episodes and Geodinamica Acta. She has been Lead Science Reviewer and served on Independent Review Teams for NASA, as well as participated as a reviewer on numerous NASA panels. Most recently, she was Lead Science Reviewer for the Standing Review Board for NASA Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer-Mass Spectrometer (MOMA-MS).

At UT Austin, she serves as the Director of the Electron Microbeam Facility and oversees the DeFord lecture series, the flagship seminar series for the Dept. of Geological Sciences. She organizes the Jackson School Master's Saturday conference, where students receiving their Master's degree present to the public regarding their research. She also serves on numerous ad hoc departmental/school-wide committees, including the awards committee and equipment committee. She is also involved in the international programming on the UT Austin campus, having been involved in the Fulbright Alumni Association and interviewing students who apply for the program, as well as serving on committees that review study abroad applications.

Catlos has interest in promoting diversity in the geosciences and involving undergraduates in geoscience research. She has been Lead Instructor for GeoFORCE, a Jackson School of Geosciences' Education program that rewards outstanding students from select South Texas Independent School Districts and Houston schools from grades 8-12. She serves as a lead PI on a National Science Foundation-International Research Experiences for Students program that provides undergraduate students underrepresented in the Earth Sciences an opportunity to conduct hands-on field training and laboratory-based research. She regularly tweets about issues facing women in STEM (@ElizabethCatlos).

Catlos received a Bachelor's degree from University of California at San Diego where she majored in Chemistry with Specialization in Earth Science. She then earned a doctorate in Geochemistry from the University of California at Los Angeles. Immediately after, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C.

Areas of Expertise

My primary research focus is geochemistry, and how the fundamentals of chemistry (mineral reactions, radiogenic and stable isotopes, major and trace elements) can be and are used to understand what the Earth was like in the past. In this, I have interests that span a broad range of range of plate boundary processes and laboratory approaches. Many ancient fault systems are clues to determine the evolution and migration of Earth's continents in the past, identify important economic resources that formed during specific times in Earth's history, and/or to assess geological hazards that result due to reactivation of older faults or mass movement of rocks. They are used to understand how plate tectonics operates today and how it operated in the past. I am interested in constraining the evolution of a number of fault systems and mountain ranges that formed during the closure of ancient ocean systems primarily across Asia, the Middle East, and Europe.

For example, a major portion of my Himalayan research agenda involves constraining past motion on the Main Central Thrust, a large-scale shear zone that worked to create the highest mountains on the planet. I currently use novel geochemical and geochronological approaches that take advantage of modern-day technology to understand how garnet-bearing rocks moved at a high-resolution scale within that structure. Garnets are chemical tape recorders, and their chemical elements can be used to ascertain the pressures and temperatures they experienced. They also enclose radioactive minerals, such as monazite, that can be dated to time their history. Data from numerous garnet-bearing rocks across the Main Central Thrust can be used to inform us regarding how and when the Himalayas uplifted in the past, and lend insight into the motion that affects it today. To this end, I collaborate and learn from other researchers, such as geophysicists and modelers.

I apply similar approaches to garnet-bearing rocks found in extensional systems in western Turkey. In this region, the plate boundary experienced a major switch in the geological past from compression to extension. Again, I apply new approaches in the thermodynamic modeling and geochronology to garnets in this locale to understand why and how this plate tectonic transition occurred.

In this portion of my research, I also include the study of granites, as these igneous bodies emplaced during the extensional phase. The timing of their formation is key pieces of information regarding how extension occurred in western Turkey, both in time and space. To this end, I pioneered new imaging approaches to their study, and collaborate with economic geologists in Turkey who are interested in how heat and fluid flow around these granite bodies are intricately involved in the formation of ore resources. Their research sparked my interest in granite petrology, and I also study this rock type in China and Slovakia. Some of these granites formed at ancient plate boundaries as continents collided, and their ages and chemistry constrain when and what types of geological processes operated during their formation.

The approaches I apply (geochemistry and geochronology) are of interest to a wide variety of researchers, so I collaborate and involve students in projects that include other geologists. An example of this is the dating of radioactive minerals from ancient meteorite impact craters and massive volcanic eruptions, events that are key for shaping how life evolved in Earth's history. These projects involve the use of modern and ever-evolving technological advances in geochemistry, such as the laser ablation of tiny zircon crystals, or the use of instruments that do not require minerals to be separated from rocks, such as secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS).

I am interested in accessory minerals, such as zircon and monazite, and what controls their appearance in metamorphic and igneous rocks. Monazite, in particular, has been a focus of my research and I have key expertise in its formation, composition, geochronology, and its use as a rare earth resource.

Although my research primarily involves compressional and extensional plate boundaries and igneous and metamorphic rocks, I recently delved into understanding sedimentary rocks from along the North Anatolian Fault, a major strike-slip system in north-central Turkey. In this research, we obtained oxygen isotopes across transects along calcite-filled fractures in limestones using SIMS. These calcite-filled fractures have the potential to record their source and provide key insight into the history of the limestones as well as their use for recording modern day fluid flow driven by seismic activity along the active fault system.

Fundamentally, my research is field-based and involves the mapping and collection of rocks and understanding their importance in addressing research questions regarding what the Earth was like in the past. The research is laboratory-based, and I take advantage of modern advances in technology applied to geosciences, including numerous facilities at UT Austin and elsewhere.


Research Locations



Current Research Programs & Projects

Understanding migration of CO2-rich fluids in deformed carbonates within an active strike-slip fault zone

Documenting the Role and Presence of Fluids in Biga Peninsula Granites: Western Turkey

Relationships between very high pressure subduction complex assemblages and intrusive granitoids in central Anatolia

Deciphering the dynamics of the Simav Fault in western Turkey

U.S.-Turkey collaboration on the gabbro-dike transition of Turkish ophiolites

Deciphering the tectonomagmatic evolution of granites in the High Tatra Mountains (Slovakia)

Monazite from the Llallagua tin ore deposit in Bolivia

Geochemistry and geochronology of meta-igneous rocks from the Tokat Massif, north-central Turkey: Implications for Tethyan reconstructions

Linking microcracks and mineral zoning of detachment-exhumed granites (western) Turkey to their tectonomagmatic history

Evidence of polymetamorphic garnet growth within the Southern Menderes Massif, western Turkey

Short-term water saturation experiments on limestone tiles to evaluate degradation and alteration

Origin of Himalayan anatexis and inverted metamorphism

Windows into the lower to middle crust in the Southern Granulite Terrain, South India

Phengite-Based Chronology of K- and Ba-Rich Fluid Flow in Two Paleosubduction Zones

Use of tourmaline as an index mineral in the Himalaya


Max Kade Distinguished Visiting Professor - Heidelberg University (2017 - 2017)

Carolyn G. and G. Moses Outstanding Teaching Award for Introductory Geoscience Course (GEO401) - UT Austin (2015)

Outstanding Reviewer, Earth and Planetary Science Letters - Elsevier (2015)

Notable Paper for Catlos (2013) "Generalizations about monazite: Implications for geochronologic studies" American Mineralogist - Mineralogical Society of America (2013)

Texas Exes Teaching Award - Texas Exes (2011)

Fulbright Lecturing Award - Fulbright (2008 - 2009)

Donald D. Harrington Fellowship - University of Texas at Austin (2007 - 2008)

Fellow of the Geological Society of America - Geological Society of America (2007)

Young Scientist Award (Donath Medal) - Geological Society of America (2006)

Junior Faculty Award - Oklahoma State University (2006)

Outstanding Reviewer - Geological Society of America Bulletin (2006)

Fellow - Institute for Geophysics and Planetary Physics (2000)

Predoctoral Fellowship - Smithsonian Institution (1997)

Predoctoral Fellowship - Smithsonian Institution (1997)

Summer Research Fellowship - NASA Specialized Center for Research and Training in Exobiology (1994)

Member, Editorial Board, International Union of Geological Sciences, Episodes (2015)

Councilor/Chair, Arthur L. Day Medal Awards Committee, Geological Society of America (2015 - 2016)

Associate Editor/Editorial Board member, Geodinamica Acta: The European Journal of Geodynamics, Geodinamica Acta (2015)

Liaison, Student Advisory Council, Geological Society of America (2015 - 2017)

Member, Ad hoc committee focused on IIGs and Divisions, Geological Society of America (2015)

Councilor/Conferee (Non-Voting), Diversity in the Geosciences Committee, Geological Society of America (2014 - 2017)

Councilor, Doris M.Curtis Memorial Fund for Women in Science Committee, Geological Society of America (2014 - 2016)

Liaison, Mineralogy, Geochemistry, Petrology, Volcanology Division, Geological Society of America (2014 - 2017)

Liaison, Structural Geology and Tectonics Division, Geological Society of America (2013 - 2017)

Elected Councilor, Geological Society of America Council, Geological Society of America (2013 - 2017)

Standing Review Board Member, Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer-Mass Spectrometer (MOMA-MS), Mars Program Office (MPO) Intake/Entrance Review, NASA (2013)

Leader, Workshop for Early Career Geoscience Faculty, On the Cutting Edge (2013)

Reviewer, Review of the Faculty Activities Report electronic system, UT Austin (2013)

Reviewer, Selection Committee for Faculty-Led Programs for Summer Abroad, UT Austin (2013)

Chair, South Central Section Management Board, Geological Society of America (2013)

Presenter, Event to promote STEM education/careers for girls through Earth Science education, GirlTalk (2013)

Member-at-Large, Young Scientist Award Committee-Donath Medal, Geological Society of America (2012 - 2015)

Vice Chair, South Central Section Management Board, Geological Society of America (2012 - 2013)

Co-Chair, GSA Annual Meeting Session 207 Advances in Mineralogy and Petrology, Geological Society of America (2012)

Undergraduate Advisor, Dept. Geological Sciences, Jackson School of Geosciences (2012 - 2013)

Lead Science Instructor, 10th Grade Arizona GeoForce Field Trip, GeoForce (2012)

Reviewer, Committee to interview and mentor UT students applying for the Fulbright Study Abroad program, UT Austin (2012)

Undergraduate Advisor, Environmental Science program, Environmental Science Institute-Dept. Geol. Sciences (2012 - 2013)

Lead Science Instructor, 10th Grade Arizona GeoForce Field Trip, GeoForce (2011)

Reviewer, Committee to interview and mentor UT students applying for the Fulbright Study Abroad program, UT Austin (2011)

Panel Member, Mars Science Laboratory Participating Scientist Review, NASA (2011)

Independent Review Team Member, Independent Review of the MOMA - Laser Desorption Mass Spectrometer (LDMS), NASA (2010)

Invited participant, Workshop Planning Activity to highlight best practices that integrate across multiple dimensions of university internationalization, particularly in science and engineering areas, NSF-Office of International Science and Engineering (2010)

Expert Witness, 93rd Judicial District, Hidalgo Country, Texas, Griffith and Garza, L.L.P. (2010)

Panel Member, Astrobiology Science & Technology for Exploring Planets, NASA (2010)

Lead Science Instructor, 10th Grade Arizona GeoForce Field Trip, GeoForce (2010)

Reviewer, Committee to interview and mentor UT students applying for the Fulbright Study Abroad program, UT Austin (2010)

Board Member, South Central Section Management Board, Geological Society of America (2009)

Campus Representative, Campus Representative for the Fulbright Program for the University of Texas, Austin, Fulbright (2009)

Vice President, Austin Chapter of the Fulbright Alumni Association, Fulbright Alumni Association (2009)

Panel Member, Review of instruments Urey: Mars Organic and Oxidant Detector and Mars Organic Molecule Analyzer (MOMA), NASA (2007)

Panel Member, Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program, NASA (2007)

Co-Chair, Fall AGU Meeting, Extensional Tectonics in the Basin and Range Province of North America and the Aegean Region of Eastern Europe and Western Anatolia Session, American Geophysical Union (2007)

Co-Chair, GSA Annual Meeting Session T53 Teaching Instrumentation to Geoscience Students: Course Design, Objectives, and Presentations, Geological Society of America (2006)

Co-Chair, Fall AGU Meeting, Post-Collisional Extension Session, American Geophysical Union (2006)

Lead Science Reviewer, Planetary Instrument Definition and Development Program, NASA (2005)

Lead Science Reviewer, Mars Science Laboratory/Sample Analysis at Mars, NASA (2005)

Panel Member, Interdisciplinary Exploration Science Review, NASA (2005)

Co-Chair, Fall AGU Meeting, Extensional Tectonics and Metamorphic Core Complexes: Their Metamorphic, Petrographic, and Kinematic Evolution Session, American Geophysical Union (2005)

Co-Chair, GSA Annual Meeting Session T87 Recent Advances in Himalayan Geology, Geological Society of America (2004)

Panel Member, Mars Science Laboratory Panel, NASA (2004)

Panel Member, Mars Instrumentation and Development Panel, NASA (2003)

Panel Member, Tectonics Panel, National Science Foundation (2002)

Co-Chair, GSA Annual Meeting Session 6 Metamorphic Petrology I, Geological Society of America (2001)

Co-Chair, Fall AGU Meeting, Thermal Structure of Tibetan and Himalayan Lithosphere: Implications for Geodynamic Models of the India-Asia Collision Session, American Geophysical Union (1999)

I am interested in mentoring students at all levels, including undergraduate, Masters and PhD. Please feel free to contact me for more information.


Graduate Students

Thomas M Etzel (Supervisor)
Broadly speaking my research interests include metamorphic petrology, isotope geochemistry, and lithosphere dynamics. Currently I am studying the tectonic evolution of western Turkey, specifically the Menderes Massif. One component of this work involves using recent advancements in garnet geothermobarometry to construct detailed P-T paths. Another component of this work will involve dating garnets using the Lu-Hf system. Combined, I hope to produce high resolution P-T-t paths that will improve our understanding of the tectonometamorphic history in this region of the world. I am also interested in fluid-rock interactions and the evolution of active geothermal systems. This includes: 1) documenting the extent of 18O/16O exchange between reservoir rocks/minerals and geothermal fluids; 2) determination– and interpretation– of hydrothermal alteration to evaluate the thermal evolution of these systems; and 3) documenting mineral chemistries (e.g. tourmaline and feldspar) to better understand system-scale fluid evolution over time.

Andrew Parisi (Supervisor)
I'm currently working on a project where I'm determining the age of formation of two impact structures, Ames Astrobleme in Oklahoma and Slate Islands in Ontario Canada. It is thought that both of these were formed during the mid-Ordovician. If true, this means they would be part of the Ordovician Meteor Event. The OME was a drastic increase in the amount of meteors hitting the Earth from roughly 470 Ma to 450 MA, and would have left the surface of the Earth pockmarked with craters. Craters or other evidence has been previously found in Sweden, China and Oman, but the North American craters have never been properly dated. I'll be exploring new ways to date the materials created by the impacts. Previous studies have focused on glass formed during the impact itself, but this glass is easily altered, destroying the chronological evidence. I'll be dating pre-existing minerals (K-feldspar and zircon) which were metamorphosed during the impact. These minerals are found in debris clasts which were previously part of the target rocks, but were ejected and emplaced into the crater.. The residual heat from the impact should be sufficient to reset the chronometers in the minerals, while the solid nature of the clasts should protect them from later alteration. I also really like teaching, and apart from being a TA I am involved with a few community scientific events.

Kate Atakturk, 2014 (Supervisor)
UT Austin
Kate's research focused on obtaining pressure-temperature conditions and ages from garnet-bearing rocks from the southern portion of the Menderes Massif in western Turkey. Her research included a field season in Turkey, and geochemical work at UT Austin. She is currently employed as a geologist by Hess Corporation.

Karen Black, M.S., 2012 (Supervisor)
University of Texas at Austin
Karen Black completed her Master's Thesis in 2012 (Geochemical and Geochronological Relationships between Granitoid Plutons of the Biga Peninsula, NW Turkey). She conducted fieldwork in Turkey in 2011 and used the UCLA ion microprobe to date zircon grains in situ in the rocks. To understand the meaning of the ages, she used cathodoluminescence equipment in the Bureau of Economic Geology and Dept. of Geological Sciences here in the Jackson School. The goal of the research was to obtain ages from the plutons, which are thought to record large-scale extension in the Biga Peninsula. The region is located in close proximity to the Aegean Sea. She published her finding to the journal Lithos. She is currently employed by Core Labs in Houston. The work was supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant No. 0937254) with additional funding provided by the Jackson School of Geosciences.

Kathryn Huber, 2011 (Supervisor)
University of Texas at Austin
Katie completed her Master's Thesis in 2011, titled "Geochemistry and geochronology of meta-igneous rocks from the Tokat Massif, north-central Turkey." She collected highly-altered meta-igneous rocks from a region in north-central Turkey that records the closure of two ancient oceans. The goal of the research was to directly date the samples to determine their sources and ages, and to develop a model for metamorphism and deformation in this region. She dated tiny zircon and baddeleyite grains using the UCLA ion microprobe. The results have been incorporated into a manuscript published in the International Journal of Earth Sciences. She is employed by Statoil. The work was supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant No. 0937254) with additional funding provided by the Jackson School of Geosciences.

Lauren Jacob, M.S., 2011 (Supervisor)
University of Texas at Austin
Lauren graduated with her Master's degree in 2011. Her thesis is titled: "Remote Sensing, Geochemistry, Geochronology, and Cathodoluminescence Imaging of the Egrigoz, Koyunoba, and Alacam Plutons, Northern Menderes Massif, Turkey." She conducted fieldwork in the northern Menderes Massif in western Turkey in 2010, and dated zircons in the rocks using the UCLA ion microprobe. She spent the rest of that summer imaging the samples using CL equipment in the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History. The goal of her project was to date these different granite bodies to determine their relationship to each other, to a major fault in the Northern Menderes Massif region, and their tectonic history. The work was published in 2012 in the American Journal of Science. The work was supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant No. 0937254) with additional funding provided by the Jackson School of Geosciences. Lauren is currently employed by Apache Corporation in Houston.

Courteney Baker, M.S., 2009 (Supervisor)
Oklahoma State University
Courteney was a student of mine when I was at Oklahoma State University and her thesis is titled: "Timing Extension in the Menderes Massif in Western Turkey Using Electron Microprobe, Ion Microprobe and Cathodoluminescence." She was also supervised by Dr. Anna Cruse. Her project involved dating monazite from two detachment-exhumed granites in western Turkey to determine the timing of extension in the region. She conducted fieldwork in Turkey and performed analytical work at here in the Jackson School and at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History. The work has been incorporated into papers published by Tectonophysics, Journal of Structural Geology, and Mineralogia. The work was supported by the National Science Foundation (Grant No. 0937254) with additional funding provided by Oklahoma State University, the Suzanne Takken Memorial Award, and the Jackson School of Geosciences. She is currently employed by Devon Energy.

Cenk Ozerdem, M.S., 2004 (Supervisor)
Oklahoma State University
Cenk was my graduate student when I was at Oklahoma State University. His thesis is titled: "Thermobarometric constraints on the Evolution of the Menderes Massif (western Turkey): Insights into the Metamorphic History of a Complexly-deformed Region." He generated peak pressures and temperatures from garnet-bearing rocks collected from a large-scale metamorphic core complex in western Turkey to understand the tectonic history of the region. His work has been incorporated into a paper in the journal Mineralogia and as part of a Special Paper published by the Geological of Society of America. We collaborated on a Lab Manual for the course Earth Materials taught here in the Jackson School (Kendall Hunt Publishers). He is currently employed by Astaldi SpA in Istanbul, Turkey.


Undergraduate Students

2017 Xiafei Zhao, Tyler Fu, Theresa Perez
2016 Emily Pease, Zoe Yin, Ashley Zare, Saloni Tandon
2015 Enrique Reyes, Kimberly Aguilera, Stephanie Suarez, Daniel Lizzardo-McPherson
2014 Colin Sturrock, Bridget Pettit, Chelsea H Jones
2013 Pamela Speciale, Isis Garber
2012 Lindsey German, Abby Kenigsbergh, Tyson McKinney
2011 Tim Shin, Heather Flynn

Undergraduate Student Funding
Geological Society of America South Central Section Undergraduate Research Grants ($1,300 total): Kimberly Aguilera ($500); Stephanie Suarez ($500), Daniel Lizzardo-McPherson ($300)
UT Austin Undergraduate Research Fellowships with match from the Jackson School ($2000 each, 7 total, Total Amount: $14,000): 2016: Emily Pease, 2015: Colin Sturrock, 2014, Bridget Pettit, Colin Sturrock, Abby Kenigsberg; 2012: Lindsey German, Pamela Speciale, 2010: Tim Shin

Undergraduate Peer-reviewed publications
Suarez, S., Brookfield, M., Catlos, E.J., Stockli, D. (2017). A U-Pb zircon age constraint on the oldest-recorded air-breathing land animal. PLoS One 12 (6), e0179262.
Sturrock, C.P., Catlos, E.J., Miller, N.R., Akgun, A., Fall, A., Gabtov, R., Yilmaz, I.O, Larson, T. Black, K. (2017) Fluids along the North Anatolian Fault, Niksar Basin, north central Turkey: Insight from stable isotopic and geochemical analysis of calcite veins. Journal of Structural Geology, 101, 58-79.
Catlos, E.J., Reyes, Eu., Brookfield, M., Stockli, D.F. (2016) Age and Emplacement of the Permian-Jurassic Menghai Batholith, Western Yunnan, China. International Geology Review, p. 1-27. dx.doi.org/10.1080/00206814.2016.1237312
Speciale, P.u, Catlos, E.J., Yildiz, G.O., Shin, T.A., Black, K.N. (2014) Zircon Ages of the Beypazari Granitoid Pluton (North Central Turkey): Tectonic Implications. Geodinamica Acta. DOI: 10.1080/09853111.2013.858955
Shin, T.A.u, Catlos, E.J., Jacob, L.g, Black, K.g (2013) Relationships between very high pressure subduction complex assemblages and intrusive granitoids in the Tav?anl? Zone, Sivrihisar Massif, central Anatolia. Tectonophysics, 595-596:183-197. DOI: 10.1016/j.tecto.2012.07.012.


Response to slab roll-back: Revealing the geodynamic history of western Turkey from the Biga Peninsula to the Menderes Massif, Geological Society of America 2016 GSA Topical Session, Denver, Colorado (2016)

Timing subduction processes via in situ (in thin section) zircon and baddeleyite geochronology: Examples from northern Turkey, Geological Society of America 2015 GSA Topical Session, Baltimore, Maryland (2015)

Invited Seminar, Louisiana State University, Dept. Geological Sciences, (2013)

Invited Seminar, Undergraduate Geological Society, UT Austin, Dept. Geological Sciences, (2011)

Invited Seminar, Pennsylvania State University, Geosciences Department (departmental talk), (2010)

Invited Seminar, Pennsylvania NASA Space Grant Consortium (general talk to broader community), (2010)

Invited Seminar, University of Arkansas, Department of Geology, (2008)

Invited Seminar, Texas Earth Science Revolution program, Austin, TX (2008)

Invited Seminar, Yale University, Department of Geology and Geophysics, (2007)

Invited Seminar, University of Michigan, Department of Geological Sciences, (2007)

Invited Seminar, UT Austin Jackson School of Earth Sciences, (2007)

Invited Seminar, Virginia Tech., Blacksburg, Department of Geosciences, (2006)

Invited Seminar, San Francisco State University, Department of Geology, (2005)

Invited Seminar, University of Houston, Department of Geosciences, (2005)

Invited Seminar, University of Missouri-Columbia, Dept. of Geological Sciences, (2005)

Invited Seminar, Utah State University, Department of Geology, (2004)

Invited Seminar, University of Kansas, Department of Geology, (2004)

Invited Seminar, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Department of Geosciences, (2004)

Invited Seminar, UT Dallas, Department of Geosciences, (2004)

Invited Seminar, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Department of Geology Seminar Series, (2003)

Invited Seminar, UT Austin, Jackson School of Earth Sciences, (2003)

Invited Seminar, Arkansas-Oklahoma Center for Space and Planetary Sciences, (2002)

Invited Seminar, Oklahoma State University-Phillips Petroleum, Electron Microprobe Presentation, (2002)

Invited Seminar, Kansas State University, Department of Geology, (2002)

Invited Seminar, University of Kansas, Department of Geology, (2002)

Invited Seminar, University of Oklahoma, School of Geology and Geophysics, (2002)

Invited Seminar, University of California, Riverside, Dept. of Earth Science, (2001)

Invited Seminar, Florida State University; Dept. Geological Sciences; 2 talks, (2001)

Invited Seminar, Oklahoma State University; Boone Pickens School of Geology, (2001)

YearSemesterCourse
2017Fall GEO 193 Technical Lecture Series
2017Fall GEO 394 Rsch In Geological Sciences
2017Summer GEO f401 Physical Geology
2017Spring GEO 386 Metamorphic Petrology
2017Spring GEO 193 Technical Lecture Series
2017Spring GEO 394 Rsch In Geological Sciences
2016Fall GEO 416K Earth Materials
2016Fall GEO 193 Technical Lecture Series
2016Fall GEO 394 Rsch In Geological Sciences
2016Spring GEO 401 Physical Geology
2016Spring GEO 171T International Learning Seminar
2016Spring GEO 193 Technical Sessions
2015Spring GEO 401 Physical Geology
2015Spring GEO 386 Metamorphic Petrology
2014Fall GEO 416K Earth Materials
2014Spring GEO 401 Physical Geology

National Science Foundation-International Research Experiences for Students (Graduate or Undergraduate - Summer 2017 and Fall 2018)
The National Science Foundation has awarded an International Research Experiences for Students (IRES) program to provide four weeks of geological field-based research and training experiences across Slovakia for undergraduate and graduate students. These students will investigate geological processes that occurred in Slovakia due to the closure of branches of ancient ocean basins. Because of its extensive exposures of ancient ocean suture zones and crustal fragments, Slovakia is an ideal location to study how continents grow.