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Scientists have analyzed a strange depression on the surface Mars, and say it could be the perfect place to search for signs of life, because it could contain three key ingredients for life: water, heat, and nutrients. The funnel-shaped structure looks like the ancient ‘ice cauldrons’ we have on Earth, that formed when volcanoes erupted…

The Oldest Bird Voice Box Ever Found

The Jurassic Park movies portrayed a prehistoric soundscape filled with brachiosaurus bellows, velociraptor shrieks and Tyrannosaurus rex roars. But because paleontologists have never found fossilized vocal organs from any of those dinosaurs, we don’t really know what their world sounded like. A new study of a 66-million-year-old bird may provide insight into some of the…

In 1974, the paleoanthropologist Donald C. Johanson led an expedition to Ethiopia to look for fossils of ancient human relatives. In an expanse of arid badlands, he spotted an arm bone. Then, in the area surrounding it, Dr. Johanson and his colleagues found hundreds of other skeletal fragments. The fossils turned out to have come…

 The once-mighty Eagle Ford Shale oil patch is on its heels, on track for the lowest amount of drilling activity in six years, and getting out-shined by another, bigger field — the Permian Basin in West Texas. But scientists Tuesday painted a vastly expanded picture of the Eagle Ford: as a place where at least…

AUSTIN – Harry Rowe has a ray gun. It’s small and gray and might, he thinks, change how companies dig for oil. Rowe is a research scientist at the University of Texas Bureau of Economic Geology. For years, he’s been trying to figure out how to speed the analysis of core samples – cylinders of…

Americans continue to lag behind numerous other countries in math and science. According to scientists, education in these fields is severely lacking. A 2015 Pew Research report found scientists said 46% of K-12 STEM education was “below average” and only 16% was “above average.” The Jackson School of Geosciences at the University of Texas at…

According to the new research, dino sounds may be what scientists call “closed-mouth vocalizations.” Unlike the high-pitched chirps and tweets from the open beaks of songbirds, the closed-mouth sounds are low, throaty whooshes of air. A flesh sac called an esophageal pouch enables birds with proportionally large bodies — think pigeons or doves — to produce the low murmurs. The researchers…

If you visited Wyoming around 50 million years ago, you might see a peculiar little bird racing through the hot, dense forests of the Eocene. About the size of a chicken, the creature would look something like a modern-day tinamou. In fact, that connection is pretty close to the mark. In a recent paper by…

Aerosol particles—the tiny bits of dust and other matter expelled by everything from volcanoes and dust storms to car exhaust and power plants—might be making thunderstorms more extreme, according to a study published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Clouds form when water droplets coalesce around these tiny particles suspended in…

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