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Jackson School Dean Sharon Mosher talks with an attendee of the Student Research Symposium.

Jackson School Dean Sharon Mosher talks with an attendee of the Student Research Symposium.

In February 2016 the Jackson School of Geosciences held its 5th Annual Student Research Symposium.

The day-long poster competition occurs every spring semester and allows students to present their research to a panel of judges composed of faculty, research scientists and industry representatives. Alumni and interested members of the public are also invited to attend. Winners are as follows:


Early Career Grad

1st place: Sarah George, “Basin evolution in northern Peru: Implications for the growth of topographic barriers linking the Central and Northern Andes”

2nd place:  Tomas Capaldi, “U-Pb geochronology of modern river sands from wedge-top foreland depo-centers; when sinks becomes the source”

 

Late Career Masters

1st place: Kelly Regimbal, “Optimizing CMP Stacking Using the Seislet Transform”

2nd place: Matt Ledvina, “Investigating the Pathways and P-T-X Conditions of Hydrothermal Fluid Flow Responsible for Cu-Au Mineralization in the Ertsberg East Skarn System, Papua, Indonesia”

 

Late Career PhD

1st place: Mason Fried, “Mass Loss Down Under: Distributed Subglacial Discharge Drives Significant Submarine Melt at a Tidewater Glacier”

2nd place: Romy Hanna, “3D measurement of fine-grained rims in CM Murchison using XCT”

 

Undergrad

1st place:  Susannah Morey, “The Evolution of the Surveyor Fan and Channel System, Gulf of Alaska Based on Core-Log-Seismic Integration at IODP Site U1417”

2nd place: Natalie Raia, “Petrogenesis of Cycladic Serpentinites: Understanding the Tectonic History Preserved in Metamorphic Rocks in Syros, Greece”

 

Best Represented Group

1st place:  Whitney Behr

2nd place: Sergey Fomel

 


Brachiosaurs via Flickr by London looks cc by 2.0

Brachiosaurs via Flickr by London looks cc by 2.0

Antarctica was a temperate environment with tremendous biodiversity millions of years ago. It wasn’t as far south as it is today, so the continent teemed with flora and fauna before becoming the sheet of ice we know it as. And the biodiversity — in particular dinosaurs — is why UT professor and paleontologist Julia Clarke has set out to Antarctica.

Austin Inno, Feb.2, 2016

 

Featuring: Julia Clarke, Professor, Department of Geological Sciences, Jackson School of Geosciences


Tim Bartholomaus speaking about his glacier research at the DeFord Lecture Series. Briana Vargas.

Tim Bartholomaus speaking about his glacier research at the De Ford Lecture Series. Briana Vargas.

When it comes to learning about how glaciers change and move, scientists have only scratched the tip of the iceberg, according to one UT researcher.

Timothy Bartholomaus, glaciologist and postdoctoral research associate in the Institute of Geophysics, discussed his research on glacier movement as part of the De Ford lecture series Thursday.

The Daily Texan, Jan.29, 2015

 

Featuring: Timothy Bartholomaus,postdoctoral researcher, University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, Jackson School of Geosciences


Julia Clarke

Julia Clarke

With stunt men, tornado clouds and a 13–foot long T-Rex puppet named Manny, “Hot Science — Cool Talks,” lecture series held on campus six times a year, will be celebrating its 100th episode in style.

For its 100th episode, the series is partnering with the Austin Independent School District and will hold the lecture this Friday at 5:30 p.m. in AISD’s brand new Performing Arts Center. Within 60 hours all 1,200 seats were sold out, Banner said.

The Daily Texan, Jan.22, 2016

Featuring:

Jay Banner, Director, Environmental Science Institute, Jackson School of Geosciences

Julia Clarke, Professor, Jackson School of Geosciences


UT towter. Chelsea Purgahn

UT towter. Chelsea Purgahn

In celebration of the Jackson School of Geosciences’ 10th anniversary, panelists and research leaders discussed Friday the ways in which humans can adapt to energy, mineral and water resource demands in a world without carbon and greenhouse gas emissions.

The Daily Texan, Jan.25, 2016

Featuring:

Yaser Alzayer, Ph.D. student, Jackson School of Geosciences

Ben Smith, Ph.D. student, Jackson School of Geosciences


Workers prepare drilling pipe on the Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex) La Muralla IV deep sea crude oil platform in the waters off Veracruz, Mexico. (Susana Gonzalez/Bloomberg)

Workers prepare drilling pipe on the Petroleos Mexicanos (Pemex) La Muralla IV deep sea crude oil platform in the waters off Veracruz, Mexico. (Susana Gonzalez/Bloomberg)

AUSTIN — Mexico’s reformers found a measure of early success with energy reform in 2015, but ahead of them lies what might be their toughest challenge yet: turning around the country’s bloated national oil company, Petróleos Mexicanos.

Pemex is a stranger to competition, having enjoyed a 76-year monopoly over Mexico’s oil and gas industry that many experts say have eroded the company’s efficiency and saddled it with far flung investments.

The Houston Chronicle, Jan.12, 2016

Featuring: Jorge Piñon, Director, Latin America and Caribbean Program, Jackson School of Geosciences


You’d think scientists would be able to figure out for sure whether the rash of North Texas earthquakes in recent years has a definite link to oil and gas drilling activity, including waste injection wells.

In fact, some scientists believe they have figured it out, and they say there is a link.

But at least one key scientist, Texas Railroad Commission geologist Craig Pearson, has been reluctant to agree. That’s important, because the Railroad Commission regulates oil and gas drilling in the state.

Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Jan.20, 2016

Featuring: Scott Tinker, Director, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geoscieces


Researchers hope to begin locating a network of seismographs by March to help determine what’s causing the earth to move across the state, including under North Texas. Scott Tinker, director of the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology, on Tuesday said a vendor for providing the equipment has been selected and a new project director, Alex Savvaidis, a researcher who did similar work for the Greek government, will start in February.

Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Jan.12, 2016

Featuring: Scott Tinker, Director, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences


Oil storage tanks in Cushing, Okla. An oil glut has sent the price of crude into a tailspin, down more than 70 percent over the last 18 months. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

Oil storage tanks in Cushing, Okla. An oil glut has sent the price of crude into a tailspin, down more than 70 percent over the last 18 months. Daniel Acker/Bloomberg

HOUSTON — The world is awash in crude oil, with enough extra produced last year to fuel all of Britain or Thailand. And the price of oil will not stop falling until the glut shrinks. The oil glut — the unsold crude that is piling up around the world — is a quandary and a source of investor anxiety that once again rattled global markets on Friday. As prices have dropped, the amount of excess production has been cut in half over the last six months. About one million barrels of extra oil is now being dumped on the markets each day. But that means the glut is still continuing to grow, and it could take years to work through the crude that is being warehoused, poured into petroleum depots or loaded onto supertankers for storage at sea.

The New York Times, Jan.15, 2016

Featuring: Scott Tinker, Director, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences


Pump jacks are seen at dawn in an oil field over the Monterey Shale formation in March 2014 near Lost Hills, California. Getty Images

Pump jacks are seen at dawn in an oil field over the Monterey Shale formation in March 2014 near Lost Hills, California.
Getty Images

California already gets a quarter of its electricity from clean sources, and Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill last year upping the state’s renewable energy mandate to 50 percent by 2030. For Golden State policymakers and activists, the question at this point isn’t how much energy the state should get from renewables: It’s how to get to as close to 100 percent as possible, as quickly as possible.

That’s the narrative I’m used to writing about. So it was fascinating to spend some time last week in fossil fuel-friendly Texas, where I joined a few dozen journalists for a two-day workshop hosted by the University of Texas at Austin’s Energy Institute. (Full disclosure: The Energy Institute paid for my travel and hotel. There was no expectation I would write anything about the conference.)

The Desert Sun, Jan.19, 2016

 

Featuring: Scott Tinker, Director, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of Geosciences


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