Skip Navigation
The University of Texas at Austin

Scientist Profiles


For most of us, it’s hard to remember the moment when we first knew what we wanted to do for the rest of our lives. Sure, we may have wanted to be a fireman, a gymnast, or an astronaut. But those notions most likely evolved gradually into other pursuits. Not so for Brian Horton. When…

Sergey Fomel Advances Seismic Data Analysis By Marc Airhart Nov. 07, 2007 Sergey Fomel grew up in Akademgorodok, literally “Academic Town,” a scientific hub in Russia’s third largest city, Novosibirsk. Surrounded by a forest of birch and pine trees, tens of thousands of scientists live and teach at Novosibirsk State University, and do research in…

Peter Flemings Works Best Under Pressure By Marc Airhart Nov. 07, 2007 Researchers working on geofluids and pore pressure in deep ocean sediments generally do not wind up at the center of media storms, but in the summer of 2000, that’s where Peter Flemings found himself. “Tidal Waves Called Threat to East Coast—Study Says Continental…

Peter Eichhubl joined the Bureau of Economic Geology in the University of Texas at Austin’s Jackson School of Geosciences as a research scientist in January 2006. Eichhubl’s research addresses the formation of faults and fractures, their effect on flow of water and hydrocarbons in the subsurface, and the chemical interaction of these fluids with rock…

David Mohrig keeps a flat, palm-sized rock on his desk that he’s had since he was six years old. He found it on a fossil-hunting trip with his father. Look closely at the piece of shallow marine limestone and you’ll see broken bits of ancient denizens of the sea: bryozoans, brachiopods, crinoids, gastropods and trilobites….

Timothy (Tip) Meckel joined the Bureau of Economic Geology as a research associate in July 2006. His research aims to discover what happens when fluids are injected into the subsurface. He works within the Gulf Coast Carbon Center investigating the geomechanical aspects of subsurface injections, seal capacity and integrity, and geophysical methods for monitoring subsurface…

Fossil corals help predict severity of global warming By Marc Airhart Oct. 30, 2006 Terry Quinn searches for just the right kinds of coral. “We look for big Volkswagen-sized corals,” he said. “Branching corals and big sea fans are pretty to look at, but they aren’t necessarily good for climate records. So we look for…

Jackson School of Geosciences
IT Help  |  Profiles  |  Privacy Policy  |  Accessibility
© 2016 Jackson School of Geosciences, The University of Texas at Austin
2305 Speedway Stop C1160, Austin, TX 78712-1692
JSG YouTube ChannelJSG RSS News FeedJSG TwitterJSG FacebookMake a Gift to JSG