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4:00 pm - Tech Sessions: Sudip Chakraborty, JSG

Tech Sessions: Sudip Chakraborty, JSG

  Start: April 1, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: April 1, 2014 at 5:00 pm
 Location:JGB 2.324 Boyd Auditorium

5:15 pm - Dr. Sean Terry, Guest Speaker hosted by Career Center

Dr. Sean Terry, Guest Speaker hosted by Career Center

  Start: April 1, 2014 at 5:15 pm     End: April 1, 2014 at 7:00 pm
 Location:JGB 2.218
 Contact:Chelsea Ochoa, chelsea.ochoa@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-0893
 URL:Event Link
How to build your Dream Career

Dr. Sean Terry, author of "How to use the Unwritten Rules of Success to build your Dream Career", will share secrets that are not taught in the classroom or on the job. This unique insight is proven to help people get paid for graduate school and/or find their first professional job. As a professor, Dr. Terry has advised more than a thousand students preparing for work and graduate school. He has received awards from National Geographic Society for education work, and has been honored for his achievements in teaching, advising and environmental research.

Schedule of events:
5:15 PM - Presentation in JGB 2.218
6:00 PM - Q&A with Dr. Terry in JGB 2.218
6:15 PM - Fajita buffet from PoK-e-Jo's in Student Center

Open to all JSG students, faculty and staff. Visit GeoSource or the JSG Career Center to RSVP.

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12:00 pm - Career Center Workshop with Dr. Sean Terry

Career Center Workshop with Dr. Sean Terry

  Start: April 2, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: April 2, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 4.102
 Contact:Chelsea Ochoa, chelsea.ochoa@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-0893
 URL:Event Link
Interactive workshop with Dr. Sean Terry
Professor & Author of "How to use the Unwritten Rules of Success to build your Dream Career"

Wednesday, April 2nd
Noon - 1:00 PM
JGB 4.102
Lunch will be provided (food available at 11:45 AM)
RSVP Required- visit GeoSource or the JSG Career Center

This workshop will build on the ideas shared in Dr. Terry's presentation on Tuesday, April 1st. If you are attending the workshop, it is also encouraged that you attend the talk on Tuesday, April 1st at 5:15 PM. Please RSVP separately for the presentation.

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4:00 pm - Tech Sessions Distinguished Speaker: Jim Kinter, IGES

Tech Sessions Distinguished Speaker: Jim Kinter, IGES

  Start: April 3, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: April 3, 2014 at 5:00 pm
 Location:JGB 2.324 Boyd Auditorium
 Contact:Rong Fu, rongfu@jsg.utexas.edu
Part of the Edwin Allday Lectureship in Geological Sciences

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10:30 am - UTIG Seminar Series: Hugh Daigle, UT PGE

UTIG Seminar Series: Hugh Daigle, UT PGE

  Start: April 4, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: April 4, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Sean Gulick, sean@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0483
 URL:Event Link
"Methane Migration and Massive Hydrate Deposits in Marine Sediments"

Abstract:

Massive hydrate deposits, defined as thick accumulations of high hydrate saturation, have been encountered in many regions worldwide. As hydrates begin to be exploited as an energy resource, it is becoming more important to understand the mechanisms that lead to development of massive hydrate deposits in coarse-grained sediments, which are the most attractive reservoirs for exploration and production activities. Hydrates may be thought of broadly within a petroleum systems framework, requiring a methane source, migration mechanisms, a reservoir, and an appropriate seal. Hydrate reservoirs and seals are defined by thermodynamics rather than buoyancy, as in the case of conventional oil and gas. Hydrates form most easily within coarse-grained sediments within the methane hydrate stability zone (MHSZ), the depth interval in which pressure and temperature favor hydrate as the stable phase. Migration of methane into the MHSZ may occur in the dissolved phase or as a free gas phase. The methane flux and the phase of supplied methane determine the rate of hydrate formation, the amount of hydrate formed, and its distribution. The evolution and persistence of massive hydrate deposits therefore require a sufficient methane supply. Three migration mechanisms are possible: (A) diffusive flux within the MHSZ of dissolved methane from finer-grained units into coarser-grained units where hydrate forms preferentially, known as short migration; (B) advective flux of dissolved methane from a source at depth into the MHSZ, known as long migration; or (C) migration of methane in the free gas phase, either produced locally within the MHSZ or supplied from the base of the MHSZ from long migration or from recycling of hydrate that is buried beneath the base of the MHSZ. Current research is focusing on these migration mechanisms in marine hydrate reservoirs as they represent some of the least understood processes in hydrate systems, but at the same time represent a crucial link between sites of methane generation and hydrate reservoirs

12:00 pm - Statoil Lunch & Learn

Statoil Lunch & Learn

  Start: April 4, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: April 4, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 4.102 Barrow Conference Room
 Contact:Maurine Riess, mriess@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-7673
Laura Zahm, a former JSG researcher, will present a talk on “Geomorphology and controls on carbonate slope sedimentation along the Florida Escarpment”.

Lunch will be provided courtesy of Statoil. Dietary restrictions will be recorded in the survey tool below for head count.

RSVP via the following link: https://utexas.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_29UQiuJUQ2JW75z

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12:00 pm - Soft Rock Seminar - Brittany Smith, DGS

Soft Rock Seminar - Brittany Smith, DGS

  Start: April 7, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: April 7, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Anastasia Piliouras, piliouras@utexas.edu

2:00 pm - *Special UTIG Seminar*

*Special UTIG Seminar*

  Start: April 7, 2014 at 2:00 pm     End: April 7, 2014 at 3:00 pm
 Location:10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, Tx 78758
 Contact:Gail Chirseson, gail@ig.utexas.edu, 512 471 0463
Mark Warner, Imperial College, London, UK
presents

"3D Full-Waveform Inversion: High-Resolution, High-Fidelity Physical Properties From Seismic Data, 2:00 PM ROC 1.603, April 7"

6:00 pm - Friends and Alumni Networking Reception in conjunction with AAPG

Friends and Alumni Networking Reception in conjunction with AAPG

  Start: April 7, 2014 at 6:00 pm     End: April 7, 2014 at 8:00 pm
 Location:Massa's Seafood Grill in Houston, TX
 Contact:Kristen Tucek, ktucek@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-775-6745

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12:00 pm - Faculty Panel: Academic Career Start

Faculty Panel: Academic Career Start

  Start: April 10, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: April 10, 2014 at 1:30 pm
 Location:ROC 2.201
 Contact:Maurine Riess, mriess@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-7673
Join an interactive discussion with JSG faculty members on the application process, advice, and experiences on the academic career. Lunch is provided by the JSG Career Center.

At the JJ Pickle Research Center in ROC 2.201 Conference Room
12:00 p.m.-1:30 p.m.

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9:30 am - BEG's Industry Day 2014

BEG's Industry Day 2014

  Start: April 11, 2014 at 9:30 am     End: April 11, 2014 at 3:45 pm
 Location:Core Research Center at the PRC
 Contact:Mark Blount, mark.blount@beg.utexas.edu, 512-471-1509
 URL:Event Link
All of us at the Bureau of Economic Geology invite you to a full day of activities showcasing the breadth of our energy and environmental research and the preeminent archive of well cores and cuttings housed at the Core Research Center. We’ll be treating you to lunch and providing you with a wide range of options from which your company can choose how best to utilize the Bureau’s work.

Industry Day will also be a great opportunity to get to know our award winning graduate students, so we welcome representatives from geosciences and environmental science recruiting teams.

If you can’t attend, please send a manager who would like to better understand the broad spectrum of the research at the Bureau of Economic Geology.

10:30 am - UTIG Seminar Series: Julie Richey, U.S. Geological Survey

UTIG Seminar Series: Julie Richey, U.S. Geological Survey

  Start: April 11, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: April 11, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Nick Hayman, hayman@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-7721
 URL:Event Link
"Reconstructing Precipitation Variability in the Western Tropical Pacific over the past Millennium"

Abstract:
Modern seasonal and inter-annual precipitation variability in Palau is linked to both meridional movement of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and changes in the Pacific Walker Circulation (PWC) associated with El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO). In order to assess how precipitation has varied on multi-decadal to centennial timescales, we present a proxy reconstruction of rainfall variability in Palau spanning the past 800 years. We use compound-specific hydrogen isotope analysis of the algal lipid, dinosterol, to reconstruct hydrologic variability from lake sediments. Results indicate a long-term trend toward dryer conditions from 1200 Common Era (C.E.) to present in Palau, with several multi-decadal and centennial-scale intervals of relative wet and dry conditions. The drying trend in Palau from the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) to the Little Ice Age (LIA) is accompanied by cooling in the Indo-Pacific Warm Pool (IPWP) and a decrease in the zonal temperature gradient across the tropical Pacific Ocean. A weakening of the Pacific Walker Circulation (PWC) from the MCA to the LIA could explain both the reduction in the zonal SST gradient and a drying trend in Palau. Neither a meridional shift in the ITCZ nor a change in the PWC completely explains the spatial pattern of precipitation proxy data in the tropical Pacific during this interval.

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12:00 pm - Soft Rock Seminar - Valentina Rossi, DGS

Soft Rock Seminar - Valentina Rossi, DGS

  Start: April 14, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: April 14, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Anastasia Piliouras, piliouras@utexas.edu

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4:00 pm - Tech Sessions: Dolores van der Kolk, JSG

Tech Sessions: Dolores van der Kolk, JSG

  Start: April 15, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: April 15, 2014 at 5:00 pm
 Location:JGB 2.324 Boyd Auditorium

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4:00 pm - Tech Sessions: Dr. Jaime Barnes, DGS

Tech Sessions: Dr. Jaime Barnes, DGS

  Start: April 17, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: April 17, 2014 at 5:00 pm
 Location:JGB 2.324 Boyd Auditorium

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10:30 am - UTIG Seminar Series: Shang-Ping Xie, UC San Diego

UTIG Seminar Series: Shang-Ping Xie, UC San Diego

  Start: April 18, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: April 18, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Yuko Okumura, yukoo@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0383
 URL:Event Link
"Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Dynamics of Global Warming"

Abstract:

Global surface air temperature has increased by less than 1oC over the past century, a change due to anthropogenic emission of greenhouse gases. Atmospheric concentration of CO2 exceeded 400 ppm at Mauna Loa in 2013 for the first time, yet global temperature has remained flat for the past 15 years. Our model results show that this apparent deviation from the anthropogenic climate warming is largely due to a decadal cooling of the tropical Pacific Ocean. This result is supported by seasonal and regional variations of climate anomalies over the past decade. This pause of global warming is temporary, illustrating the importance of natural variability in interpreting decadal climate trends.

California is in a deep drought that started three years ago. How precipitation will change in the face of global warming is an important question but difficult to answer. The challenge has to do with the characteristics of precipitation change. While surface temperature is expected to rise everywhere in response to the greenhouse gas forcing, precipitation change is to first order spatially variable, positive in some regions and negative in some others. Spatial pattern of ocean warming has emerged as an important factor for tropical rainfall change. The talk will discuss recent research in coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions pertinent to regional climate change.

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12:00 pm - Soft Rock Seminar - Meredith Bush, DGS

Soft Rock Seminar - Meredith Bush, DGS

  Start: April 21, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: April 21, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Anastasia Piliouras, piliouras@utexas.edu

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4:00 pm - Tech Sessions: Lindsay Jo Olinde, JSG

Tech Sessions: Lindsay Jo Olinde, JSG

  Start: April 22, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: April 22, 2014 at 5:00 pm
 Location:JGB 2.324 Boyd Auditorium

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4:00 pm - Tech Sessions: Edwin Schauble, UCLA

Tech Sessions: Edwin Schauble, UCLA

  Start: April 24, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: April 24, 2014 at 5:00 pm
 Location:JGB 2.324 Boyd Auditorium
 Contact:Jaime Barnes, jdbarnes@jsg.utexas.edu

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10:30 am - UTIG Seminar Series: Maureen Davies, Australia National University

UTIG Seminar Series: Maureen Davies, Australia National University

  Start: April 25, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: April 25, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, R2200
 Contact:Sean Gulick, sean@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0483
 URL:Event Link
"To Tune or Not to Tune: Changes in Northeast Pacific Ventilation through Termination 1"

Abstract:

An abrupt increase in atmospheric CO2 and depletion of atmospheric D14C during the most recent deglaciation (Termination 1) is thought to be related to venting of aged carbon from the interior ocean, perhaps near Antarctica. We use radiocarbon reconstructions of past ocean ventilation rates to constrain oceanic sources and sinks of CO2, and evaluate mechanisms of subsurface hypoxia. However, records from the North Pacific are inconsistent and/or equivocal in their evidence for the presence of an aged watermass in the interior Pacific. Here we evaluate a deglacial radiocarbon record from the Gulf of Alaska on age models derived via two common techniques: tuning to the isotopic record of Greenland, and calibrating planktonic foraminiferal 14C.

12:00 pm - BHP Billiton Lunch & Learn

BHP Billiton Lunch & Learn

  Start: April 25, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: April 25, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:EPS 1.126
 Contact:Chelsea Ochoa, chelsea.ochoa@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-0893
Lunch & Learn with BHP Billiton

Technical talk:
Seismic Stratigraphic Relationships with a Lowstand Reservoir System: Examples from the Barrow Group, Southern Exmouth Sub-Basin, NW Australia

RSVP to the JSG Career Center.

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8:30 am - MS Thesis Day

MS Thesis Day

  Start: April 26, 2014 at 8:30 am     End: April 26, 2014 at 3:30 pm
 Location:Jackson Geological Sciences Building
 Contact:Department of Geological Sciences, dgs@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-471-5172
 URL:Event Link
Sponsored by BHP Billiton
Part of the Tech Sessions Speaker Series

The program begins at 8:30 am with welcoming remarks. The first talks begin at 9 am. Two rooms will operate simultaneously: JGB 2.216 and 2.218. Each talk is 15 minutes long, which includes question and answer time. Full schedule and abstracts available at: https://docs.google.com/file/d/0Bw9jcdmD-DixRVc0UU4ybEV4Zzg/edit

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9:00 am - Career Center Open House

Career Center Open House

  Start: April 28, 2014 at 9:00 am     End: April 28, 2014 at 12:00 pm
 Location:JGB 2.112
 Contact:Chelsea Ochoa, chelsea.ochoa@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-0893
Last open house of the semester!

JSG students, faculty and staff are invited to the JSG Career Center for bagels and coffee.

12:00 pm - Soft Rock Seminar - David Mohrig, DGS

Soft Rock Seminar - David Mohrig, DGS

  Start: April 28, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: April 28, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Anastasia Piliouras, piliouras@utexas.edu

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4:00 pm - Tech Sessions: Aaron Jones, JSG

Tech Sessions: Aaron Jones, JSG

  Start: April 29, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: April 29, 2014 at 5:00 pm
 Location:JGB 2.324 Boyd Auditorium

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12:00 pm - Networking Luncheon & Scientific Talk with Dr. John Goff

Networking Luncheon & Scientific Talk with Dr. John Goff

  Start: April 30, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: April 30, 2014 at 2:00 pm
 Location:Corpus Christi Town Club, Bay Room 2
 Contact:Kristen Tucek, ktucek@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-775-6745
Rapid Response Initiative: Research activities conducted in the field after natural disasters provide valuable basic information that allows affected communities both to recover and to plan for the next destructive natural event – because there is ALWAYS another one. Such research activities can also save lives, by helping these communities improve damaged infrastructure.

As a community, however, geoscientists have traditionally found it difficult to arrive "on scene" fast enough to capture the critical time-sensitive environmental changes these events produce. The Jackson School has therefore made the strategic decision to support a limited number of "rapid response" missions. From Haiti to the Solomon islands, from Long Island to the Gulf Coast, these missions have successfully documented precise, fleeting evidence of such natural calamities.

    
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