Spotlighting JSG’s Newly Minted Doctorates!

Please join us in congratulating the over 15 graduate students who have finished defending their PhDs!

** This story will be continually updated during the 2021-22 academic year as Jackson School of Geosciences graduate students successfully defend their dissertations.

Kudos to Grace Beaudoin, Yuquian Gan, Andrew Gase, Zhicheng Geng, Harpreet Kaur, Kevin Meazell, Paul Morris, Sebastian Ramiro Ramirez, Benjamin Rendall, Colin Schroeder, Justin Thompson, Anna Turetcaia, Alison Tune, Wanying Wang, Wei Wei, and Kathleen Wilson.

Grace Beaudoin

Grace Beaudoin
The Behavior of Halogens (F, Cl, Br, I) in Altered Oceanic Crust during Prograde Subduction Zone Metamorphism and Devolatilization
The project, defended on April 18 2022, was supervised by Dr. Jaime Barnes with committee members including Drs. Sarah Penniston-Dorland, Daniel Stockli, John C Lassiter, and Timm John
Abstract: To be added

   
   
Yuqian Philomena Gan

Yuquian (Philomena) Gan
Shelf-Slope Sediment Transport in Medium-Sized Basin Margin Clinoforms , with a Focus on Slope Channel Facies and Architecture
The project, defended on April 15 2022, was supervised by Dr. Cornel Olariu and Dr. Ron Steel with committee members including Drs. Cristian Carvajal, Brian K Horton, and David Mohrig 
Abstract: To be added

   
   
Andrew Gase

Andrew Gase
Seismic Investigations of Subduction and Intra-arc Rifting at the Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand
The project, defended on November 16, 2021, was supervised by Dr. Harm Van Avendonk and co-supervised by Dr. Nathan Bangs and with committee members including Drs. Jaime Barnes, Dan Bassett, Kyle Spikes and Nicola Tisato.

Abstract: Subduction zones are dynamic systems that control the global distribution of large earthquakes and volcanism. Many interrelated factors can control tectonic, seismic, and magmatic processes within subduction zones, including mechanisms that vary stress, thermal regime, volatile supply, as well as inherited features within the lithosphere, but the relative importance of these factors are debated. North Island New Zealand, where the Pacific Plate subducts beneath the Australian Plate, is renowned for its unique patterns of seismicity and plate coupling in the forearc, the Hikurangi margin, and its magmatically productive intra-arc rift, the Taupo Volcanic Zone. In this dissertation I present three studies that use newly acquired controlled-source seismic data to evaluate (1) crustal and sedimentary controls on seismic behavior in the Hikurangi margin forearc, and (2) interplays between magmatism and crustal deformation in the offshore Taupo Volcanic Zone. In the first study, I explore the crustal structure of the northern Hikurangi margin, which is world renowned for its low seismic coupling, frequent shallow slow slip events,and strong ground-motion amplification during large earthquakes. I show that sharp along- strike variations in frontal accretion indicate variable sediment supply and past subduction of seamounts. Low velocities in the overthrusting plate indicate the presence of compliant materials that likely contribute to tsunamigenesis and enhanced ground motion during earthquakes. In a second study, I compare the structure of the megathrust fault across the interseismic coupling transition between the central and southern Hikurangi margin and reveal a clear correlation between sediment subduction and slip behavior. In the northern and central unlocked, slow slipping segments, the megathrust forms within pelagic carbonates and volcanic sediments. In contrast, the southern locked megathrust is localized to pelagic carbonates and is insulated from the effects of volcanics by ~0.5-1 km of subducting clastic sediment. I propose that slip behavior and coupling is controlled by the lithology and spatial distribution of frictional asperities along the megathrust. Finally, I determine the crustal structure of the offshore Taupo Volcanic Zone and demonstrate that crustal extension and recent magmatic activity are collocated. Deep-penetrating crustal normal faults overlie a ~40-kilometer-wide zone of sill-complexes and heterogeneous seismic velocities in the upper and middle crust. I propose that magmatic intrusions are localized by more permeable fractured crust and contribute to thermal weakening which facilitates rifting.

Geng

Zhicheng Geng
Deep Learning for Pattern Recognition in Seismic Reflection Data
The project, defended on April 19 2022, was supervised by Dr. Sergey Fomel with committee members including Drs. Luming Liang, Mrinal K Sen, Omar Ghattas, and Xinming Wu


Abstract: To be added

   
   
Harpreet Kaur

Harpreet Kaur
Improving Accuracy And Efficiency Of Seismic Data Analysis Using Deep Learning
The project, defended on April 12 2022, was supervised by Dr. Sergey Fomel with committee members including Drs. Raymond Abma, Mrinal K Sen, George Biros, and Kyle T Spikes 


Abstract: To be added

   
   

MeazellKevin Meazell
Deepwater Methane Hydrate Characterization in the Gulf  of Mexico: Sedimentology and Stratigraphy
The project, defended in Fall 2021, was supervised by Dr. Peter Flemings with committee members including Drs. [need content]
Abstract: To be added

   
   
Paul Morris

Paul Morris
Modeling the Architecture and Dynamic Connectivity of Deep-Water Channel Systems Using a Forward Stratigraphic Model
The project, defended on April 21 2022, was supervised by Dr. David Mohrig and Dr. Jacob Covault with committee members including Drs. Richard Sech, Zoltan Sylvester, and Timothy A Goudge
Abstract: To be added

   
   
Ramirez

Sebastian Ramiro Ramirez
Integrated Stratigraphic and Petrophysical Analysis of the Wolfcamp at Delaware Basin, West Texas, USA
The project, defended on February 18 2022, was supervised by Dr. Peter Flemings with committee members including Drs. Nicola Tisato, Athma R Bhandari, Hugh C Daigle, and Charles Kerans.
Abstract: To be added

   
   

Benjamin RendallBenjamin Rendall
Regional and Global Controls on Carbonate Factory Composition and Stratigraphic Architecture During Global Icehouse:  Examples from the Pennsylvanian, New Mexico and the Pleistocene, Bahamas
The project, defended on April 14, 2022, was supervised by Dr. Charles Kerans with committee members including Drs. Steven L. Bachtel, Brian K Horton, David Mohrig and Xavier Janson 

Abstract: To be added

   
   
Colin Schroeder

Colin Schroeder
In-Situ Visualization and Characterization of Mud-Filtrate Invasion and Filter Cake Deposition Using Time-Lapse X-Ray Micro-Computed Tomography (Micro-CT)
The project, defended on April 15 2022, was supervised by Dr. Charles Kerans with committee members including Drs. Nicola Tisato and Robert G Loucks


Abstract: To be added

   
   
Justin Thompson

Justin Thompson
Exploring Groundwater Recoverability
The project, defended in Fall 2021, was supervised by Dr. Michael Young with committee members including Drs. [need content]

BEG news item
Abstract: To be added

   
   
Anna Turetcaia

Anna Turetcaia
Aerobic Metabolism of Organic Matter across the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface through the Lens of Flume Experiments and Models

The project, defended on May 13 2022, was supervised by Dr. Bayani Cardenas with committee members including Drs. Adam Kessler, Daniel O Breecker, Philip C Bennett, and Matthew H. Kaufman 


Abstract: To be added

   
   
Alison Tune

Alison Tune
Interactions between Carbon Cycling and Bedrock Weathering in a Forest of the Northern California Coast Ranges
The project, defended in Fall 2021, was supervised by Dr. Daniella Rempe and Philip Bennett with committee members including Drs. [need content]
Abstract: To be added

   
   
Wanying Wang 2

Wanying Wang
Continental Dynamics of the North American Plate
The project, defended in Fall 2021, was supervised by Dr. Thorsten Becker with committee members including Drs. [to be added].

Abstract: To be added

   
   
Wei Wei Img 3447

Wei Wei
Bathymetric and Subglacial Hydrological Context for the Basal Melting of Antarctic Ice Shelves
The project, defended on November 19, 2021, was supervised by Dr. Don Blankenship and Dr. Patrick Heimbach with committee members including Drs. Zong-Liang Yang, Duncan A Young, Omar Ghattas, and Cyril Grima.


Abstract: To be added

   
   
Kat Wilson

Kathleen Wilson
The Quaternary Sedimentology, Geomorphology, and Sediment Transport Mechanisms in The Bahamas and Turks and Caicos Islands
The project, defended on April 22 2022, was supervised by Dr. David Mohrig with committee members including Drs. Travis Swanson, Timothy A Goudge, and Charles Kerans
Abstract: To be added

   
   

Compiled by Kristin Phillips, Department of Geological Sciences