I joined BEG as a postdoctoral fellow in 2013 after getting my Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from University of Maine. With a solid background of mechanics, I enjoy multidisciplinary research and have a wide range of research experiences. For my master theses, I analyzed the large deformation and instability of hyperleastic materials. For my Ph. D, I developed computational/analytical models to simulate natural hydraulic fracture initiation and propagation associated with transformation of solid kerogen to liquid oil, and conversion of oil to gas in shale formations. I also investigated multiple hydraulic fractures in poroelastic rocks. My current research is focused on fluid injection induced earthquakes. We try to investigate the causative relationship between fluid injection and induced seismic fault slip by integrating geological and geophysical data into a poroelastic finite element model. My research interests include borehole stability, hydraulic fracture, interaction between fluid flow, rock deformation and crack growth, and abnormal pressure modeling in sedimentary basins.

Areas of Expertise

Poroelastic modeling of sedimentary basins, Fracture and damage mechanics of rocks, Borehole stability, Natural and Induced hydraulic fracture, Fluid injection induced earthquake


Current Research Programs & Projects

RPSEA project Relationships between induced seismicity and fluid injection: development of strategies to manage fluid disposals in shale hydrocarbon plays.


Graduate research award - University of Maine (2012)

Chase distinguished research assistantship - University of Maine (2011)