Dr. Gregory Frebourg achieved his entire academic curriculum at the University of Geneva, Switzerland. After graduating his bachelor in Geology in 2004, he specialized in sedimentology, working on his Masters in deep clastic systems. He focused in turbidite dynamics in the Tertiary of the North Alpine Foreland Basin (Conglomerats du Vouan Fm. and Gres des Voirons Fm.). After graduating early 2006, he joined TOTAL S.A. for an internship in Pau, France, before starting his Ph.D. in summer 2006. From deep clastics, Dr. Frebourg went to littoral carbonates, assessing the hydrocarbon reservoir potential of carbonate eolian deposits. He moved to Texas after graduating his Ph.D. cum laude, hired as a Research Associate at the Bureau of Economic Geology at the University of Texas at Austin. Since September 2010, Dr. Frebourg has been doing fundamental and applied research in sedimentology in unconventional systems for the Mudrock System Research Laboratory and the State of Texas Advance Resources Recovery Project (STARR), and still enjoys some work on carbonates with the Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory. Dr. Frebourg started spring semester 2013 lecturing at the Jackson School of Geosciences, University of Texas at Austin, teaching the Introduction to Field Methods and Stratigraphy class. He coordinates and co-teaches the Geology of Mudrock Systems graduate class (fall semester), and Sedimentary Rocks for the Energy Management Program of the McCombs School of Business.

Areas of Expertise

Sedimentology, sedimentary processes, sedimentary dynamics, depositional environments, micropaleontology, mudrocks, carbonates, siliciclastics


Research Locations



Current Research Programs & Projects

Sedimentary dynamics of the middle Boquillas (Eagle Ford equivalent) along HWY 90, West Texas (Mudrock system Research Laboratory)

Sedimentary dynamics of the Ernst member of the Boquillas formation (possible Eagle Ford equivalent) In Big Bend National Park, West Texas (Mudrock system Research Laboratory)

Large scale investigation and internal architecture of the Ernst member of the Boquillas formation (possible Eagle Ford equivalent) In Big Bend National Park, West Texas, using LIDAR and Photogrametry (Mudrock system Research Laboratory)

Sedimentary dynamics of the 13 Fingers Formation. Ochiltree Co. Texas Panhandle (Mudrock system Research Laboratory)

Micropaleontology of the Cenomanian-Turonian mudrocks of West Texas (Eagle Ford Fm., Mudrock Systems Research Laboratory)

Sedimentology and sedimentary dynamics of the Cherokee Group, Pennsylvanian, Anadarko Basin, Texas (Mudrock Systems Research Laboratory, State of Texas Advanced Resource Recovery Project)


Select Past Research

Sedimentary dynamics of the Haynesville / Bossier mudrock systems on the western part of the Haynesville Basin, East Texas (Mudrock system Research Laboratory)

Paleoenvironments based on foraminifera assemblages and micropaleontology of Miocene cores from offshore Java, Indonesia (Reservoir Characterization research Laboratory)

Micropaleontology and paleoenvironments of Miocene cores from the Philippines (Reservoir Characterization research Laboratory)

Carbonate coastal dunes: potential reservoir rocks? (Ph.D. research and dissertation)

Graduate Students

Justin V Mauck, M.S., expected 2016 (Co-supervisor)

Sebastian Cardona, M.S., expected 2015 (Committee Member)
Mass Transport Deposits (MTDs) may constitute a critical factor in modeling fluid flow because they have low porosity and permeability values. However the ability for MTDs to act as subsurface seals is, at present, a poorly understood phenomenon. A research project was undertaken in field of the Atwater Valley 349 block, eastern Gulf of Mexico to specify the role of mass transport processes in defining the geometry and transmissibility nature of contacts between MTDs and reservoir-bearing strata, and to better understand the role of mass transport processes in the shaping of hydrocarbon traps. Recent studies have demonstrated that clay mineral fabric intensity within MTDs can be altered during deposition or through near surface modification processes rather than as part of normal consolidation or diagenetic processes. Recognition of zones with enhanced microfabrics has important implications for seismic anisotropy as well as for shallow fluid and sealing potential evaluation.

Kathryn O Fry, M.S., expected 2014 (Co-supervisor)

Maria I Prieto, Ph.D., expected 2014 (Committee Member)
My research work involves understanding the interaction between gravity-driven and current-controlled sedimentary processes in the lower continental slope to abyssal plain transition in the central Gulf of Mexico (GOM); and how the local structural controls (salt) affecting the bathymetry of the basin can influence these processes. I use near seafloor high resolution geophysical data as my primary dataset. The outcome of my research will be also useful as an analog model for interpreters working with older stratigraphic units within the GOM where seismic resolution is low.

Anine Pederson, M.S., expected 2014 (Committee Member)

Ningjie Hu (Co-supervisor)


Joseph Smitherman from the CRC stepping over the edge of an outcrop to help with handheld gamma spectrometer measurements

Sedimentary dynamics and processes involved in the deposition of the middle Boquillas Fm. (Eagle Ford equivalent) along HWY 90, West Texas. Work is done on the outcrop, sometimes in interesting conditions...

Joseph Smitherman from the CRC stepping over the edge of an outcrop to help with handheld gamma spectrometer measurementsBrains at work (Drs. Loucks, Ruppel and Frébourg - pic: J. E. Sivil) MSRL field trip 2012 (R. Baumgardner)Just another day in the field (D. Valencia)The truth revealed (Drs. Loucks and Ruppel in foreground, Frébourg in background). MSRL field trip 2013 (R. Baumgardner)Logging a section in the middle Boquillas (D. Smith)

 

Katie at the top of the Ernst member

Field work of the Ernst member of the Boquillas Fm. (Eagle Ford equivalent), in Big Bend national Park, with Master Student Kathryn Fry

Katie at the top of the Ernst memberThe Rio Grande, with Mexico on the left, and outcrops of the Ernst and San Vicente members of the Boquillas on the rightLogging a section near the hot springsMeasuring sections in remote areas (San Vicente member)Ochotillo flower (K. Fry)Highway cleaning patrolExtensive outcrops of the Ernst member of the Boquillas Fm. overlain by the regional

 

A word on flash floods in Zion nat'l park (E. Garza)

Pictures from the GeoFORCE southwest section trip to Arizona, June 2013

A word on flash floods in Zion nat'l park (E. Garza)Eolian stratification explained in Zion nat'l park (E. Garza)The GeoFORCE group in front of Checkerboard Mesa, Zion nat'l park (E. Garza)Group picture at Balanced RocksFood quality control inspector at Zion nat'l parkThe Navajo Sandstone cliff over the Colorado riverProbably the most breathtaking classroom on Earth (E. Garza)

 

Personal page at the Bureau of Economy
Personal page at the Bureau of Economy