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Surface Hydrologic Processes News Archive


AUSTIN — The University of Texas and the Lower Colorado River Authority will be utilizing data from a new NASA satellite to better forecast droughts and floods. NASA launched the $900 million Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite Jan. 31. The satellite orbits the earth approximately every 90 minutes and is capable of measuring the…

  A new network of underground sensors in the Texas Hill Country will arm those responsible for managing the state’s finite water supply with vital information for determining the chances of drought and dangerous floods. The Texas Soil Observation Network (TxSON), run by the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin’s…

  Scientists using ice-penetrating radar data collected by NASA’s Operation IceBridge and earlier airborne campaigns have built the first comprehensive map of layers deep inside the Greenland Ice Sheet, opening a window on past climate conditions and the ice sheet’s potentially perilous future. This new map allows scientists to determine the age of large swaths…

Texas water supplies, currently stressed by drought, could be further affected by the federal listing of five freshwater mussel species under the Endangered Species Act, but most of the potential impacts could be mitigated by innovative water strategies, according to a study by the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin’s…

Lifeless Waters

Analysis reveals how limited natural buffering of Mississippi River pollution is likely contributing to Gulf of Mexico “dead zone” By John Williams “For whatever we lose…, it’s always our self we find in the sea,”the poet E.E. Cummings once wrote. Cummings was no water-quality expert, but his line unintentionally touches upon a major environmental problem:…

A team led by scientists at the University of Texas at Austin’s Institute for Geophysics has for the first time directly observed multiple parts of Greenland’s subglacial plumbing system and how that system evolves each summer to slow down the ice sheet’s movement toward the sea. These new observations could be important in accurately modeling…

In 2012, professor Zong-Liang Yang was in the Netherlands speaking at a workshop on extreme weather. It was the year after the worst recorded single-year drought in Texas history. Yang made colleagues an offer: hold the next biannual conference in Texas and the University of Texas at Austin would host it. Last week, Yang and…

AUSTIN, Texas — Thwaites Glacier, the large, rapidly changing outlet of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet, is not only being eroded by the ocean, it’s being melted from below by geothermal heat, researchers at the Institute for Geophysics at The University of Texas at Austin (UTIG) report in the current edition of the Proceedings of…

A new method of measuring the interaction of surface water and groundwater along the length of the Mississippi River network adds fresh evidence that the network’s natural ability to chemically filter out nitrates is being overwhelmed. The research by hydrogeologists at The University of Texas at Austin, which appears in the May 11 edition of…

As the bitter 2011 Texas drought stretched on into its third year, the Jackson School of Geoscience’s Center for Integrated Earth System Science (CIESS) hosted its third annual Water Forum. The forum, held Oct. 14 -15, 2013, focused on the latest research on droughts and other extreme weather events and provided a forum for discussion…

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