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Structural Geology/Lithospheric Geodynamics News Archive


When he came to the Bureau of Economic Geology in 1980, Martin Jackson was a hard-rock kind of guy. He was grew up in what was then Rhodesia (today, Zimbabwe), prospected for minerals there and in South Africa and Namibia, studied the metamorphic history of Precambrian gneisses in the Forbidden Area of the Namib Desert…

Los Angeles Times, July 13, 2013 Featuring: Ian Dalziel Ancient volcanoes discovered deep in the ocean off Antarctica may explain a climate mystery critical to predicting Earth’s fate as humans pump more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. University of Texas geologists dredging thousands of feet below the surface of the central Scotia Sea off the…

A team of scientists led by Ian Dalziel from the Institute for Geophysics has found geologic evidence that casts doubt on one of the conventional explanations for how Antarctica’s ice sheet began forming. The team discovered an ancient volcanic arc that might have prevented the creation of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

LiveScience, July 10, 2013 Featuring: Dusty Schroeder, Don Blankenship A sprawling network of low-lying canals, similar to a swamp, hides under Antarctica’s Thwaites Glacier, a new study finds. The fast-flowing Thwaites Glacier is one of the largest ice streams in West Antarctica. Scientists think Thwaites could significantly retreat in the next 20 years, adding to global sea level…

An international team of 34 scientists sets sail today aboard the scientific ocean drilling vessel JOIDES Resolution to collect sediments in the Gulf of Alaska and investigate the interactions between long-term global climate change and the simultaneous growth of mountain belts. The team is co-led by Sean Gulick, research associate professor at The University of Texas…

A tectonic plate that disappeared millions of years ago has turned up in Central California and Mexico. New research from Brown University found that part of the Baja region of Mexico and part of central California near the Sierra Nevada mountains sit upon slabs of this long-lost plate. It’s a big breakthrough in how we…

The Geological Society of London, the world’s oldest and one of its most prestigious geological organizations, has announced it will award medals to two scientists working at the Bureau of Economic Geology, Martin P. A. Jackson, senior research scientist, and Christopher Jackson, senior research fellow. Martin Jackson will receive the William Smith Medal, presented for…

It’s the nightmare scenario: A magnitude 7.8 earthquake begins at the southern end of the San Andreas Fault and the rupture continues moving northwest 200 miles along the fault to a spot about 50 miles north of Los Angeles. Buildings collapse, wildfires spark, and electric power and water systems are damaged. Experts project such an…

The 2010 Earthquake in Haiti, 2000 Years Ago

Scientists have discovered underwater evidence that Haiti’s unusual 2010 earthquake may not have been the first of its kind in the region. They took core samples from the seafloor that reveal a 2000-year-old sequence of sediment layers closely resembling landslide deposits triggered by the 2010 quake, indicating an older event of similar violence and other…

Traditionally, geothermal energy has been associated with regions of intense volcanic or hydrothermal activity, like Iceland. For decades, however, scientists have wondered if the less volatile subsurface in areas such as Texas could provide economically viable locations for geothermal power. Bruce Cutright, a research associate at the Bureau of Economic Geology, and colleagues are helping answer that question through several…

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