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The University of Texas at Austin

Sedimentary Geology/Geomorphology News Archive


A new study from the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at The University of Texas at Austin forecasts that one of the nation’s most productive shale gas basins, the Fayetteville Shale, will continue to be a major contributor to U.S. natural gas supplies for years to come, with economically recoverable reserves of 18 trillion cubic…

Hurricane Sandy last year did more harm to coastal cities and homes than any hurricane in U.S. history, except Katrina. Most of that damage has been repaired. But there’s other damage that people can’t see to the underwater coastline, known as the shoreface. Apparently, Long Island’s shoreface did remarkably well against the storm of the…

In October 2013, the Bureau of Economic Geology’s Tip Meckel led a crew of 27 on a 10-day 3D seismic data collection cruise off the Texas coast in the Gulf of Mexico. This activity was part of a multi-year geologic characterization effort to identify potential carbon dioxide (CO2) storage sites beneath the Texas portion of…

Video: From Austin to the Arctic

This summer 60 graduate students and 15 professors from the University of Texas at Austin participated in Statoil’s Svalex Arctic field trip, focused on petroleum geology, petroleum engineering and geophysics.

Scientists using instruments on the Mars rover Curiosity have determined that a deposit of wind-blown sand and dust in Gale Crater is chemically and mineralogically similar to deposits previously analyzed by the Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity at two other sites on the red planet. Sediments in all three locations were produced by the…

An international team of 34 scientists sets sail today aboard the scientific ocean drilling vessel JOIDES Resolution to collect sediments in the Gulf of Alaska and investigate the interactions between long-term global climate change and the simultaneous growth of mountain belts. The team is co-led by Sean Gulick, research associate professor at The University of Texas…

The Geological Society of London, the world’s oldest and one of its most prestigious geological organizations, has announced it will award medals to two scientists working at the Bureau of Economic Geology, Martin P. A. Jackson, senior research scientist, and Christopher Jackson, senior research fellow. Martin Jackson will receive the William Smith Medal, presented for…

AUSTIN, Texas — A rapid response science team from the University of Texas at Austin’s Institute for Geophysics will help map the impact of Hurricane Sandy on the beach/barrier systems off the south shore of Long Island. Follow our rapid response field blog with live updates from the ship. The team will collaborate this month with…

The 2010 Earthquake in Haiti, 2000 Years Ago

Scientists have discovered underwater evidence that Haiti’s unusual 2010 earthquake may not have been the first of its kind in the region. They took core samples from the seafloor that reveal a 2000-year-old sequence of sediment layers closely resembling landslide deposits triggered by the 2010 quake, indicating an older event of similar violence and other…

With the rapid disappearance of its protective buffer of wetlands, New Orleans is becoming more vulnerable to storms every year. But recent research has revealed important clues about how to shore up these vanishing wetlands and generated new optimism about saving the delta.

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