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Marine Geosciences News Archive


Andrew Smith studies undersea gas vents, large volcano-like features on the seafloor that spew plumes of oil and gas into the ocean. Scientists have long been interested in them because many contain large amounts of gas hydrate, an icy substance made of natural gas and water. Gas hydrates might be mined someday as an alternative…

This past summer, a team of scientists from the University of Texas at Austin completed the first of a series of expeditions in the Gulf of Mexico surveying potential offshore storage sites for carbon dioxide (CO2). In the process, they tested out a new type of seismic instrument designed to reveal geologic layers and structures…

AUSTIN, Texas — A rapid response science team from the University of Texas at Austin’s Institute for Geophysics will help map the impact of Hurricane Sandy on the beach/barrier systems off the south shore of Long Island. Follow our rapid response field blog with live updates from the ship. The team will collaborate this month with…

The Leading Edge, August 2012 Featuring: Sean Gulick, John Goff, Marcy Davis, Dan Duncan, Steffen Saustrup

See shipwrecks, deep sea life and gas seeps in the Gulf of Mexico during an expedition led by University of Texas at Austin scientist Jamie Austin. Live video feeds from remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) with high-definition cameras put anyone with an Internet-enabled computer right in the middle of the action.

Visions of sugar plums they were not, but you could forgive Jamie Austin for feeling as if he were dreaming. On his screen he saw what looked like big glass bowls sparkling in the headlamps of the remotely operated vehicle (ROV). At another site, he saw rows of partially buried clay jars, some with eel heads…

Explorer Robert Ballard, who discovered the wreck of the R.M.S. Titanic in 1985, is partnering with scientists from The University of Texas at Austin and other institutions to webcast a live scientific expedition to the eastern Mediterranean Nov. 10-18. People around the world will be able to view live video feeds and submit questions 24…

An international team of geoscientists has discovered an unusual geological formation that helps explain how an undersea earthquake off the coast of Sumatra in December 2004 spawned the deadliest tsunami in recorded history. “The results suggest we should be concerned about locations with large thicknesses of sediments in the trench, especially those which have built marginal…

Wired, Jun. 21, 2011 Featuring: Lorena Moscardelli

Teacher at Sea

Julie Pollard, a 7th and 8th grade science teacher from Watauga, Texas used a video-enabled laptop to take students on virtual tours of the ship. At one stop, a micropaleontologist was explaining how she and her colleagues were sampling cores to find nannofossils and she told the kids how many could fit across one human…

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