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Marine Geosciences News Archive


This release was produced by MARUM – Center for Marine Environmental Sciences in Bremen, Germany. Access the original German release: http://ow.ly/mHFY30554dX In April and May, 2016, a team of international scientists drilled into the site of the asteroid impact, known as the Chicxulub Impact Crater, which occurred 66 million years ago. Sean Gulick, a research professor at The…

Research published in the May 6 edition of Science indicates that slow-motion earthquakes or “slow-slip events” can rupture the shallow portion of a fault that also moves in large, tsunami-generating earthquakes. The finding has important implications for assessing tsunami hazards. The discovery was made by conducting the first-ever detailed investigation of centimeter-level seafloor movement at…

An international research team is formalizing plans to drill nearly 5,000 feet below the seabed to take core samples from the crater of the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs. The group met last week in Merida, Mexico, a city within the nearly 125-mile-wide impact site, to explain the research plans and put out a…

Catch a Falling Sediment

Planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber (G. ruber)—a single-cell organism with a hard outer shell—is perhaps one of the most widely used species for reconstructing past sea-surface conditions. Recent studies suggest two subspecies, or morphotypes, called G. ruber sensu stricto and G. ruber sensu lato live at different depths and therefore must not be mixed when reconstructing…

Follow the Carbon

As Alaska’s permafrost melts and degrades,what happens to the massive amount of carbon stored underneath in the form of frozen organic matter? Someof it may discharge with the melting water through underground cracks and seeps in the once-frozen landscape and end up in the Arctic Ocean. That’s the working theory of University of Texas at…

Growing up amid the crisp, cold landscape of the Canadian Rockies, Rowan Martindale’s family liked to vacation in tropical environs with warm waters. As a result, the high-country farm girl learned to snorkel and scuba dive and explored coral reefs at an early age. Now, through her studies of ancient reefs, Martindale, an assistant professor…

Shale has the spotlight for now. But there’s another, lesser-known substance with the potential to yield even greater quantities of natural gas: methane hydrate. “A lot of geoscientists are fascinated by hydrates because of how odd it is that you can take methane gas and add water and have it result in something with such…

Hurricane Sandy last year did more harm to coastal cities and homes than any hurricane in U.S. history, except Katrina. Most of that damage has been repaired. But there’s other damage that people can’t see to the underwater coastline, known as the shoreface. Apparently, Long Island’s shoreface did remarkably well against the storm of the…

As coastal communities continue to rebuild in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, scientists at this week’s annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union offer some encouraging news: The storm did not seriously damage the offshore barrier system that controls erosion on Long Island. Long-term concerns remain about the effects on the region of sea-level rise,…

A Geophysics Legend Retires

Paul Stoffa, professor and Shell Distinguished Chair in Geophysics, has retired after 30 years of service to the University of Texas at Austin. As a leader of geophysical research for 40 years, he has inspired colleagues, fellow geophysicists, and a long succession of graduate students, including over 50 PhDs. He has published over 100 research…

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