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Geophysics News Archive


Scientists using radar data from NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) have found a record of the most recent Martian ice age in the planet’s north polar ice cap. The new results, published in the May 27 issue of the journal Science, agree with previous models that indicate a glacial period ended about 400,000 years ago,…

Cenote Descent

The Chicxulub impact’s biggest claim to fame is wiping out the dinosaurs. But, as I mentioned in my first post from Merida, the impact also played a role in shaping the hydrology of the Yucatan, including the region’s most distinctive hydrological feature–cenotes. A collection of at least 900 outline the land-based portion of the Chicxulub crater…

Touring UTIG’s Airplane

By Laura Lindzey, a graduate student at the Jackson School of Geosciences. The post first appeared on her blog.  Don Blankenship’s research group at UTIG has been collecting geophysical data in Antarctica for decades. Each season, we hire Kenn Borek Air1 to operate one of their modified airplanes, stuff it full of sensors, and fly around…

University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG) Professor and Jackson Chair in Applied Seismology Mrinal Sen has been awarded the place of Honorary Membership in the Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG). According to the SEG official website, the award of Honorary Membership “shall be conferred upon persons who, in the unanimous opinion of the Honors…

Hurricane Sandy last year did more harm to coastal cities and homes than any hurricane in U.S. history, except Katrina. Most of that damage has been repaired. But there’s other damage that people can’t see to the underwater coastline, known as the shoreface. Apparently, Long Island’s shoreface did remarkably well against the storm of the…

JSG Presenters at SEG 2013

For the first time, scientists have documented an acceleration in the melt rate of permafrost, or ground ice, in a section of Antarctica where the ice had been considered stable. The melt rates are comparable with the Arctic, where accelerated melting of permafrost has become a regularly recurring phenomenon, and the change could offer a…

Austin American-Statesman, July 14, 2013 Featuring: Dusty Schroeder, Don Blankenship, Duncan Young, UTIG A team of University of Texas researchers recently discovered a swamplike system of water under an Antarctic glacier the size of New Mexico — a finding that might hold the key to how quickly the polar ice will melt and the seas…

Los Angeles Times, July 13, 2013 Featuring: Ian Dalziel Ancient volcanoes discovered deep in the ocean off Antarctica may explain a climate mystery critical to predicting Earth’s fate as humans pump more carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. University of Texas geologists dredging thousands of feet below the surface of the central Scotia Sea off the…

AUSTIN, Texas — In a development that will help predict potential sea level rise from the Antarctic ice sheet, scientists from The University of Texas at Austin’s Institute for Geophysics have used an innovation in radar analysis to accurately image the vast subglacial water system under West Antarctica’s Thwaites Glacier. They have detected a swamp-like…

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