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Climate News Archive


Rising Sea Level Tied to Faster Melt

Wall Street Journal, June 2, 2013 Featuring: Clark Wilson Accelerated melting of polar ice sheets and mountain glaciers was the driving factor behind a rise in the global sea level of 16.8 millimeters, or about two-thirds of an inch, between 2005 and 2011, according to a study published Sunday in Nature Geoscience. The study resolves long-standing…

An international team of 34 scientists sets sail today aboard the scientific ocean drilling vessel JOIDES Resolution to collect sediments in the Gulf of Alaska and investigate the interactions between long-term global climate change and the simultaneous growth of mountain belts. The team is co-led by Sean Gulick, research associate professor at The University of Texas…

American paleoecologist Dr. Robert Dull believes he’s pretty much solved the mystery behind a catastrophic global climate change event from the sixth century. As the new History series “Perfect Storms” shows, Dull has found solid circumstantial evidence that an eruption at El Salvador’s Lake Ilopango volcano was the cause of the so-called Dust Veil of…

This past summer, a team of scientists from the University of Texas at Austin completed the first of a series of expeditions in the Gulf of Mexico surveying potential offshore storage sites for carbon dioxide (CO2). In the process, they tested out a new type of seismic instrument designed to reveal geologic layers and structures…

With her research interests and enthusiasm flowing forth like a raging river when she speaks, it’s no surprise that Kevan Moffett studies the dynamic role of water in the earth sciences. As she begins her career at the Jackson School of Geosciences, Moffett will focus on the fields of hydrogeology and ecohydrology, exploring the relationships…

Scientists have discovered the cause for an observed slowdown in the Walker Circulation (WC) over the past 60 years, and in the process boosted their confidence in atmospheric models. The WC is a wind pattern in the tropical Pacific that, as it changes from year to year, spawns floods and droughts in North America and…

Linking Hurricane Sandy and Climate Change

Hurricane Sandy was dubbed a “Super storm” for its unusual formation. Kerry Cook, a climate scientist at the Jackson School, calls it a hybrid that was “drawing energy from the warm tropical Atlantic, but also from strong temperature gradients associated with the jet stream and the cold front.” Cook cautions against making any direct connection…

Perhaps the only positive thing about the 2011 drought in Texas, the state’s worst single-year drought in history, is that it ended up being the mother of all teaching moments. The lessons learned are not pleasant, but addressing them will give the state a fighting chance when the next major drought comes around.

Fracturing of the Antarctic Ice Sheet

Academic Minute (WAMC in Albany, NY), July 18, 2012 Featuring: Joe MacGregor

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded The University of Texas at Austin and six other universities $3 million to establish the Delta Dynamics Collaboratory (DDC), a network of researchers working to build a comprehensive set of computer models that can reliably predict the physical and ecological evolution of river deltas. Deltas, which host highly…

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