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Climate Change Can Tear Down Mountains

The St. Elias Mountains in Alaska are more than 5000 meters tall, testament to a tectonic plate wedged underneath the region that is driving them up like a snowplow. But the St. Elias range also contains some of the world’s largest glaciers, which inexhaustibly scour the mountains and dump sediment in the sea. Now, a…

We’re on the cusp of a new era for science and computer science. People are able to measure natural phenomena more precisely thanks to all the new sensors and the Internet of Things. We can handle immense amounts of data thanks to new data management technologies. And we’re producing ever more sophisticated algorithms and computer…

Surprisingly, scientists know very little about the water that’s located beneath the Earth’s surface. To overcome this knowledge gap, an international team of researchers has put together a new global map showing where and in what quantities this precious resource is located. To put this map together, the University of Victoria’s Tom Gleeson, along with…

Driving down McKinney Falls Parkway today, you wouldn’t think to look twice. It’s a small hill, about 100 feet to 150 feet high, that resembles a typical Hill Country view. But it’s the material underneath that makes it unique: volcanic igneous rock. It’s hard to imagine Austin 80 million years ago, when the volcano, now…

SALT LAKE CITY — A strange pig-snouted turtle that lived alongside tyrannosaurs and duck-billed dinosaurs has been discovered in Utah. The University of Utah announced the finding in a news release Wednesday. A team from the Natural History Museum of Utah discovered fossils of strange-looking turtle in the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah….

U.S. should support basic research

BY KITTY L. MILLIKEN Special to the Star-Telegram Basic research into how our planet operates is an essential investment. That’s why it is alarming that the reauthorization of the America Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science Act of 2007, or America COMPETES Act — passed by the U.S. House in…

Two new studies are adding to concerns about one of the most troubling scenarios for future climate change: the possibility that global warming could slow or shut down the Atlantic’s great ocean circulation systems, with dramatic implications for North America and Europe. One study, by three scientists from Germany’s Alfred Wegener Institute, uses computers to model how…

Mapping as Mexico Opens for Exploration

MEXICO CITY — Now that Mexico’s potential oil and gas riches are open to outside investment, how does the industry figure out what’s there? North of an east-west line across the Gulf of Mexico are United States waters, where the bedrock deep below the ocean floor has proved to hold vast reservoirs of oil and…

Milliken: Finding the Upside of a Downturn

While not wanting to be dismissive of the current downturn in the oil and gas industry, Kitty L. Milliken – winner of AAPG’s Robert R. Berg Outstanding Research Award and co-recipient of the Wallace E. Pratt Memorial Award for best AAPG Bulletin article – points out that had she not been laid off during the…

The story starts with six scientists and six glaciers. They set out to Alaska and Greenland to study earthquakes caused by glaciers breaking up. To do this, they hooked seismic sensors up to these big pieces of ice. However, when they pulled this data down, they heard something new: the sound of melting glaciers. Tim…

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