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UT Researcher Discusses Glacier Research

When it comes to learning about how glaciers change and move, scientists have only scratched the tip of the iceberg, according to one UT researcher. Timothy Bartholomaus, glaciologist and postdoctoral research associate in the Institute of Geophysics, discussed his research on glacier movement as part of the De Ford lecture series Thursday. The Daily Texan,…

This summer, 16 students from UT and the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México in Mexico will participate in an exchange program to study and develop computation techniques that will help scientists collect and analyze geoscience data. According to Jorge Pinon, program manager for the Jackson School of Geosciences, as the need for energy reform becomes…

With stunt men, tornado clouds and a 13–foot long T-Rex puppet named Manny, “Hot Science — Cool Talks,” lecture series held on campus six times a year, will be celebrating its 100th episode in style. For its 100th episode, the series is partnering with the Austin Independent School District and will hold the lecture this…

In celebration of the Jackson School of Geosciences’ 10th anniversary, panelists and research leaders discussed Friday the ways in which humans can adapt to energy, mineral and water resource demands in a world without carbon and greenhouse gas emissions. The Daily Texan, Jan.25, 2016 Featuring: Yaser Alzayer, Ph.D. student, Jackson School of Geosciences Ben Smith,…

AUSTIN — Mexico’s reformers found a measure of early success with energy reform in 2015, but ahead of them lies what might be their toughest challenge yet: turning around the country’s bloated national oil company, Petróleos Mexicanos. Pemex is a stranger to competition, having enjoyed a 76-year monopoly over Mexico’s oil and gas industry that many experts say have eroded the…

You’d think scientists would be able to figure out for sure whether the rash of North Texas earthquakes in recent years has a definite link to oil and gas drilling activity, including waste injection wells. In fact, some scientists believe they have figured it out, and they say there is a link. But at least…

Researchers hope to begin locating a network of seismographs by March to help determine what’s causing the earth to move across the state, including under North Texas. Scott Tinker, director of the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology, on Tuesday said a vendor for providing the equipment has been selected and a new project director, Alex Savvaidis,…

Stock Prices Sink in a Rising Ocean of Oil

HOUSTON — The world is awash in crude oil, with enough extra produced last year to fuel all of Britain or Thailand. And the price of oil will not stop falling until the glut shrinks. The oil glut — the unsold crude that is piling up around the world — is a quandary and a source of…

California already gets a quarter of its electricity from clean sources, and Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill last year upping the state’s renewable energy mandate to 50 percent by 2030. For Golden State policymakers and activists, the question at this point isn’t how much energy the state should get from renewables: It’s how to get to as close…

Nature Controls Colorado River Outlook

The Colorado River Basin’s water supply is mainly affected by wet and dry weather cycles, not changes in human use, according to a study led by researchers from the University of Texas at Austin. The strained nature of the system is caused by the lack of enough precipitation between droughts to fully replenish what was consumed,…

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