Skip Navigation
The University of Texas at Austin

Blog


Taxidermy for Paleontologists

By Monica Kortsha The life of a paleontologist doesn’t always mean working with rock-encased fossils. Sometimes specimens can be downright fluffy. Last week Becky Desjardins, a preparator at the Naturalis Biodiversity Center in the Netherlands, taught Jackson School paleontology students how to preserve modern birds using specimens housed in the collections at the Jackson School…

UT Fossil Collections Bring Big Cat to Life

By Monica Kortsha Heroically posed men and horses commemorate the past 200 years of Texas history on The University of Texas at Austin campus. Go to the east edge of campus, near the Butler School of Music, and you’ll leave behind modern history—the kind documented by treaties, paintings, letters and newspapers—to see a monument to…

Digging up geology’s spooky side

The geosciences are spookier than your introduction to petrology class may have let on. Some geological formations are said to be haunted by ghosts, while others hold the bones of actual people. This Halloween we want to share with you our list of geological phenomena—from the macabre to the mysterious—that can make you shudder the…

Dino-sized Outreach

Jackson School Assistant Professor Rowan Martindale shares how her lab participated in the Hot Science, Cool Talks community science fair. Check out more posts from Rowan on her blog, Finding Fossils.   Last week the Martindale lab did something new: we did outreach with dinosaur shoes. The goal was to have children make a “fossil dinosaur…

This summer JSG Professor Rowan Martindale and graduate student Nick Ettinger traveled to Morocco and Slovenia to look for Early Jurassic rocks, specifically those from the Toarcian Oceanic Anoxic Event (~183 million years ago). She describes her travels below: In Morocco, I am starting a new collaboration with Dr. Stéphane Bodin (Aarhus University) so we were…

Some Thoughts from Back Home

I returned to Austin, Texas on Saturday night. But I want to write one more post to sum up my thoughts on reporting from Mexico on the Chicxulub expedition. First of all, I’m so glad I had the opportunity to report on the mission from the field. Geoscientists know the importance of fieldwork for collecting…

No Core Today, But Plenty of History

Today on the ferry  to L/B Myrtle the drill manager came to me and my co-travellers with bad news. The drill bit had worn out again and needed to be replaced – a task that requires pulling up over 860 feet of drill pipes, one by one, back up through the borehole. We weren’t going…

Cenote Descent

The Chicxulub impact’s biggest claim to fame is wiping out the dinosaurs. But, as I mentioned in my first post from Merida, the impact also played a role in shaping the hydrology of the Yucatan, including the region’s most distinctive hydrological feature–cenotes. A collection of at least 900 outline the land-based portion of the Chicxulub crater…

  When I’m not on the L/B Myrtle with the Chicxulub research team, I’m in Merida, Mexico, the capital of the Yucatan state. I found out on Monday that my neighbors in Merida include two Chicxulub expedition research scientists: Doug Schmitt, a researcher at the University of Alberta, and Chris Nixon, his graduate student. While…

Aboard the Good Ship L/B Myrtle

Yesterday I went to a museum in Merida to learn about the Chicxulub impact. Today I went right to the impact site by boarding the L/B Myrtle, the boat that’s homebase for scientists drilling into the crater. I had an amazing time learning about the research from the scientists on board, including the Jackson School’s…

Jackson School of Geosciences
IT Help  |  Profiles  |  Privacy Policy  |  Accessibility
© 2017 Jackson School of Geosciences, The University of Texas at Austin
2305 Speedway Stop C1160, Austin, TX 78712-1692
JSG YouTube ChannelJSG RSS News FeedJSG TwitterJSG FacebookMake a Gift to JSG