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2017 Media Releases


Researchers studying marine fossil beds in Italy have found that the world’s worst mass extinction was followed by two other extinction events, a conclusion that could explain why it took ecosystems around the globe millions of years to recover. The extinction events are linked to climate change caused by massive volcanic activity, according to the…

Scientists from The University of Texas at Austin have found that high levels of methane in well water from two counties near Fort Worth are probably from shallow natural gas deposits, not natural gas leaks caused by hydraulic fracturing operations in the underlying Barnett Shale. The research, published in the journal Groundwater, builds on previous…

New research from The University of Texas at Austin reveals that the Earth’s unique iron composition isn’t linked to the formation of the planet’s core, calling into question a prevailing theory about the events that shaped our planet during its earliest years. The research, published in Nature Communications on Feb. 20, opens the door for…

By Monica Kortsha Beneath the glowing chandeliers of The University of Texas at Austin’s Union ballroom, people and ideas mixed among research posters. The sound of presentations and discussions, questions and anecdotes, advice and encouragement, created an amiable buzz that kept up throughout the Jackson School’s Sixth Annual Research Symposium, an event organized by the…

The Earth’s mantle—the layer between the crust and the outer core—is home to a primordial soup even older than the moon. Among the main ingredients is helium-3 (He-3), a vestige of the Big Bang and nuclear fusion reactions in stars. And the mantle is its only terrestrial source. Scientists studying volcanic hotspots have strong evidence…

A trove of exceptionally preserved Jurassic marine fossils discovered in Canada, rare for recording soft-bodied species that normally don’t fossilize, is expanding scientists’ view of the rich marine life of the period. The preservation of the fossils—which include soft body parts as well as shells and bones—ranks the site among the highest quality sources of…

The Bureau of Economic Geology of the Jackson School of Geosciences at The University of Texas at Austin has just announced the publication of a new book documenting the wonders of geology in Texas, Texas Through Time. Written by award-winning geologist Dr. Thomas E. Ewing, with contributions from a range of bureau geoscientists, its preparation…

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