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GEHA Meeting

GEHA Meeting

  Start: December 1, 2016     End: December 1, 2016
 Contact:Jenisha Patel, jenishapatel@utexas.edu
Meeting 4

4:00 pm - De Ford Lecture Series: Timothy A. Goudge

De Ford Lecture Series: Timothy A. Goudge

  Start: December 1, 2016 at 4:00 pm     End: December 1, 2016 at 5:00 pm
 Location:JGB2.324

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10:30 am - UTIG Seminar Series: UTIG Graduate Student Presentations

UTIG Seminar Series: UTIG Graduate Student Presentations

  Start: December 2, 2016 at 10:30 am     End: December 2, 2016 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC ROC Room 1.603
 Contact:Krista Soderlund, krista@ig.utexas.edu, 218-349-3006
 URL:Event Link
Benjamin Wagman:
A perturbed physics climate model ensemble for investigating equilibrium climate sensitivity

Daniel Lalich:
Using Ground Penetrating Radar to Read the Climate Record in the Martian North Polar Layered Deposits

Eric Petersen:
New constraints on surface debris layer composition for Martian glaciers

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12:00 pm - iPGST: Jon Major, UT Austin

iPGST: Jon Major, UT Austin

  Start: December 7, 2016 at 12:00 pm     End: December 7, 2016 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Emily H.G. Cooperdock, emilyhgoldstein@utexas.edu
Informal Petrology, Geochemistry, Structure and Tectonics Seminar

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10:30 am - UTIG Special Seminar: Tom Jordan, British Antarctic Survey

UTIG Special Seminar: Tom Jordan, British Antarctic Survey

  Start: December 9, 2016 at 10:30 am     End: December 9, 2016 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC ROC Room 1.603
 Contact:Ian Dalziel, ian@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0431
 URL:Event Link
Mapping the hidden mosaic of Antarctica; From microplate movement to continental assembly

Due to the blanketing ice sheet and remote location Antarctic is one of the least explored and poorly understood regions on our planet. The key geological division of Antarctica is between an ancient East Antarctica craton, once at the heart of the Gondwanan supercontinent, and the collage of fragments making up the tectonically more active West Antarctic province. Within West Antarctica geological studies suggest that as a pre-cursor to the breakup of Gondwana one of these fragments, the Haag Ellsworth Whitmore Mountains block, was translated 1500 km and rotated through 90° from a position between East Antarctica and South Africa. Geophysical data has been used to challenge this notion, and suggest little or no block motion. Here we use new regional compilations and analysis of magnetic and gravity data to discuss the feasibility and implications of an alternative tectonic model with significant (500 km) movement, but limited (30°) block rotation. In contrast to West Antarctica the East Antarctic craton has been seen as a monolithic block, split by simple linear geological boundaries extrapolated from sparse coastal outcrops. However, the most up to date geophysical data from the PolarGAP survey around the South Pole supports an alternative view that East Antarctica is also a composite structure, with a complex of sutures and boundaries resulting from continental assembly, which continue to influence the sub-ice topography to this day.

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12:00 pm - Alumni Reception in San Francisco in conjunction with AGU Meeting

Alumni Reception in San Francisco in conjunction with AGU Meeting

  Start: December 14, 2016 at 12:00 pm     End: December 14, 2016 at 2:00 am
 Location:ThristyBear Brewing Company, 661 Howard St. in San Francisco
 Contact:Kristen Tucek, ktucek@jsg.utexas.edu, 512.471.2223

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