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3:00 am - Climate Forum: Dr. Jonathon Wright, Tsinghua University

Climate Forum: Dr. Jonathon Wright, Tsinghua University

  Start: January 6, 2014 at 3:00 am     End: January 6, 2014 at 4:00 am
 Location:Barrow Conference Room, JGB 4.102
 Contact:Kai Zhang, kzkaizhang@gmail.com, 5125206902
"Does the Rainforest Initiate the Wet Season over the Southern Amazon?"

For more information about Dr. Wright and his research, please refer to his personal website: http://www.atm.damtp.cam.ac.uk/people/jw660/index.html; and his research site at: http://www.cess.tsinghua.edu.cn/publish/ess/7687/2012/20120619141317866273695/20120619141317866273695_.html.

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Future of Geoscience Undergraduate Education Summit

Future of Geoscience Undergraduate Education Summit

  Start: January 10, 2014     End: January 12, 2014
 URL:Event Link
We are hosting an NSF-sponsored summit on the Future of Geoscience Undergraduate Education to engage a broad spectrum of the geoscience community in a comprehensive review of geoscience curriculum, pedagogy, and use of technology with the ultimate, longer-term goal of creating a community vision for undergraduate geoscience education in the future.

Application deadline: Oct. 15, 2013

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Future of Geoscience Undergraduate Education Summit

Future of Geoscience Undergraduate Education Summit

  Start: January 10, 2014     End: January 12, 2014
 URL:Event Link
We are hosting an NSF-sponsored summit on the Future of Geoscience Undergraduate Education to engage a broad spectrum of the geoscience community in a comprehensive review of geoscience curriculum, pedagogy, and use of technology with the ultimate, longer-term goal of creating a community vision for undergraduate geoscience education in the future.

Application deadline: Oct. 15, 2013

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Future of Geoscience Undergraduate Education Summit

Future of Geoscience Undergraduate Education Summit

  Start: January 10, 2014     End: January 12, 2014
 URL:Event Link
We are hosting an NSF-sponsored summit on the Future of Geoscience Undergraduate Education to engage a broad spectrum of the geoscience community in a comprehensive review of geoscience curriculum, pedagogy, and use of technology with the ultimate, longer-term goal of creating a community vision for undergraduate geoscience education in the future.

Application deadline: Oct. 15, 2013

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12:00 pm - Soft Rock Seminar - Mauricio Perillo

Soft Rock Seminar - Mauricio Perillo

  Start: January 13, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: January 13, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Anastasia Piliouras, piliouras@utexas.edu

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12:00 pm - UTIG Seminar: Serge A. Shapiro, Freie Universitaet Berlin,Germany

UTIG Seminar: Serge A. Shapiro, Freie Universitaet Berlin,Germany

  Start: January 16, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: January 16, 2014 at 1:00 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Ian Dalziel, ian@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0431
 URL:Event Link
“Triggered versus Induced Earthquakes and Bounds of the Magnitude Probability”

Abstract:

Fluid-induced seismicity results from an activation of finite rock volumes. The finiteness of perturbed volumes influences frequency-magnitude statistics. We observe that induced large-magnitude events at geothermal and hydrocarbon reservoirs are frequently underrepresented in comparison with the Gutenberg-Richter law. This is an indication that the events are more probable on rupture surfaces
contained within the stimulated volume. Here we theoretically and numerically analyze this effect. We consider different possible scenarios of event triggering: rupture surfaces located completely within or intersecting only the stimulated volume, and derive lower and upper bounds of the probability to induce a given-magnitude event. The bounds depend strongly on the minimum principal size of the
stimulated volume. We compare the bounds with data on seismicity induced by fluid injections in boreholes. Fitting the bounds to the frequency-magnitude distribution provides estimates of a largest expected induced magnitude and a characteristic stress drop, in addition to improved estimates of the Gutenberg-Richter a and b parameters. The observed frequency-magnitude curves seem to follow mainly the lower bound. However, in some case studies there are individual large-magnitude events clearly deviating from this statistic. We propose that such events can be interpreted as triggered ones, in contrast to the absolute majority of the induced events following the lower bound.

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10:30 am - UTIG Seminar Series: Adrien Arnulf, UC San Diego

UTIG Seminar Series: Adrien Arnulf, UC San Diego

  Start: January 17, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: January 17, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Harm Van Avendonk, harm@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0429
 URL:Event Link
"Anatomy of an Active Submarine Volcano"

Abstract:

Most of the magma erupted at mid-ocean ridges is stored in a mid-crustal melt lens that lies at the boundary between sheeted dikes and gabbros. Nevertheless, images of the magmatic plumbing system linking the melt lens to the overlying eruption site have remained elusive. Here, we have combined full waveform inversion (FWI) and reverse time migration (RTM) of multichannel seismic (MCS) data to present accurate, high-resolution images of the magmatic system underlying Axial volcano that straddles the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Our results reveal a complex melt body beneath the summit caldera, which is approximately 14 km long, 3 km wide and up to 1 km thick. The estimated volume of the reservoir is 29.7 km3, more than two orders of magnitude greater than the erupted magma volumes of the 1998 and 2011 eruptions. Our images show a network of sub-horizontal to shallow dipping (<30?) features that we interpret as the plumbing system facilitating melt transport beneath the central volcano to the 1998 and 2011 eruption sites. These images also reveal a subsiding caldera floor that provides a near perfect trap for the ponding of lava flows, supporting a “trapdoor” mechanism for caldera formation as in some sub-aerial volcanoes.

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12:00 pm - iPGST Seminar: Ryan Anderson

iPGST Seminar: Ryan Anderson

  Start: January 22, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: January 22, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Michael Prior, mprior@utexas.edu

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8:30 am - JSG Research Symposium

JSG Research Symposium

  Start: January 25, 2014 at 8:30 am     End: January 25, 2014 at 4:30 pm
 Location:Texas Union Ballroom
 Contact:Mareen LeVoir, levoir@utexas.edu
 URL:Event Link
Each spring semester, Jackson School students present their research in a day-long poster competition. Throughout the day, judges comprised of faculty, research scientists, and industry representatives evaluate the posters. At the closing ceremony, 1st- and 2nd-place poster awards are presented in the following categories: Undergraduate, Early-Career Graduate, Late-Career Masters, and Late-Career Ph.D. Another award is given to the best represented research group(s). The goal of the Symposium is to provide cross-disciplinary collaboration among graduate students, undergraduate students, and faculty/research scientists at the Jackson School.

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9:00 am - Career Center Open House

Career Center Open House

  Start: January 27, 2014 at 9:00 am     End: January 27, 2014 at 12:00 pm
 Location:JGB 2.112
 Contact:Chelsea Ochoa, chelsea.ochoa@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-232-0893
Stop by the career center for coffee and bagels between 9-Noon and hear about what's coming up this semester.

12:00 pm - Soft Rock Seminar - Xiaoping Liu, China University of Petroleum

Soft Rock Seminar - Xiaoping Liu, China University of Petroleum

  Start: January 27, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: January 27, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Anastasia Piliouras, piliouras@utexas.edu

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12:00 pm - iPGST: Emily Hernandez-Goldstein

iPGST: Emily Hernandez-Goldstein

  Start: January 29, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: January 29, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Michael Prior, mprior@utexas.edu

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10:30 am - UTIG Seminar Series: Jeroen Tromp, Princeton University

UTIG Seminar Series: Jeroen Tromp, Princeton University

  Start: January 31, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: January 31, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Omar Ghattas, omar@ices.utexas.edu, 512-232-4304
 URL:Event Link
"Toward Exascale Seismic Imaging: Taming Workflow and I/O Issues"

Abstract:

Providing a better understanding of the physics and chemistry of Earth's interior through numerical simulations has always required tremendous computational resources. Post-petascale supercomputers are now available to solve complex scientific problems that were thought unreachable a few decades ago. They also bring a cohort of concerns tied to obtaining optimum performance. Several issues are currently being investigated by the HPC community. These include energy consumption, fault resilience, scalability of the current parallel paradigms, workflow management, I/O performance and feature extraction with large datasets. In this presentation, we focus on the last three issues.

In the context of seismic imaging, in particular for simulations based on adjoint methods, workflows are well defined. They consist of a few collective steps (e.g., mesh generation or model updates) and of a large number of independent steps (e.g., forward and adjoint simulations of each seismic event, pre- and postprocessing of seismic traces).
The greater goal is to reduce the time to solution, that is, obtaining a more precise representation of the subsurface as fast as possible. This brings us to consider both the workflow in its entirety and the parts comprising it. The usual approach is to speedup the purely computational parts by code tuning in order to reach higher FLOPS and better memory usage. This still remains an important concern, but larger scale experiments show that the imaging workflow suffers from a severe I/O bottleneck. This limitation occurs both for purely computational data and seismic time series. The latter are dealt with by the introduction of a new Adaptable Seismic Data Format (ASDF). In both cases, a parallel I/O library, ORNL's ADIOS, is used to drastically lessen the weight of disk access. Moreover, parallel visualization tools, such as VisIt, are able to take advantage of the metadata included in our ADIOS outputs to extract features and display massive datasets. As large parts of the workflow are embarrassingly parallel, we also investigate the possibility of automating the imaging process with the integration of scientific workflow management software, such as Pegasus, Kepler, or Swift.