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Read the 2014 Newsletter - A tradition since 1950, the Newsletter highlights research, news and achievements by Jackson School faculty, students, scientists and alumni

Read the 2014 Newsletter

A tradition since 1950, the Newsletter highlights research, news and achievements by Jackson School faculty, students, scientists and alumni

Video: Fire, Ice & Huge Quantity of Potential Energy - Researchers at the Jackson School of Geosciences are leading a project to learn more about frozen methane under the Gulf of Mexico

Video: Fire, Ice & Huge Quantity of Potential Energy

Researchers at the Jackson School of Geosciences are leading a project to learn more about frozen methane under the Gulf of Mexico

Video: Unveiling Earth's Surface - Airborne lidar at the Jackson School's Bureau of Economic Geology

Video: Unveiling Earth's Surface

Airborne lidar at the Jackson School's Bureau of Economic Geology

Video: New Stash of Ice Age Fossils

Video: New Stash of Ice Age Fossils

The Miracle of Flight - A graduate student discovers the largest flying animal in history: the Texas Pterosaur

The Miracle of Flight

A graduate student discovers the largest flying animal in history: the Texas Pterosaur

Risk of Amazon Rainforest Dieback is Higher Than IPCC Projects

Risk of Amazon Rainforest Dieback is Higher Than IPCC Projects

  AUSTIN, Texas — A research team led by The University of Texas at Austin has been awarded approximately $58 million to analyze deposits of frozen methane under the Gulf of Mexico that hold enormous potential to increase the world’s energy...

OCT
30

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Jessica Warren
4:00 PM

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Jessica Warren

  Start: October 30, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: October 30, 2014 at 5:00 pm

OCT
31

UTIG Seminar Series: Rodrigo Fernandez-Vasquez, UTIG
10:30 AM

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Jessica Warren

  Start: October 30, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: October 30, 2014 at 5:00 pm

UTIG Seminar Series: Rodrigo Fernandez-Vasquez, UTIG

  Start: October 31, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: October 31, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Sean Gulick, sean@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0483
 URL:Event Link
"Deglaciation of Marine Environments, Lessons and Questions from Patagonia and the Antarctic Peninsula"

Abstract:

Retreat of marine ice bodies from continental shelves and fjords is a complex process where internal ice dynamics is affected by atmospheric, oceanic and geological factors. During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) ice extended to the edge of the continental shelf in the Antarctic Peninsula (AP). The maximum western extent of what constituted the second largest ice body in the southern hemisphere, the Patagonian Ice Sheet (PIS; or Patagonian Ice Cap for some) is still unknown although partial evidence suggest that it might have reached the shelf break in some areas while others might have terminated on land. Geographic proximity, coupling of ocean and atmospheric systems, and some glacial history evidence suggest a certain level of connection between the ice sheets of Patagonia and the AP at least during the last few thousand years before the deglaciation of the continental shelf.

Variable levels of detail exist about the history of deglaciation along the western Antarctic Peninsula. About three decades of marine surveys have resulted on the collection of large amounts of bathymetric and multibeam data, and of hundreds of sediment cores. Today, there is a good understanding of sea floor geomorphological features related to ice retreat dynamics but age control of these features or post glacial sediments is still a methodological challenge. On the other hand, the knowledge of the deglaciation history of the Patagonian continental shelf and fjords is restricted to a handful of fjords with virtually nothing known about the continental shelf.

I will present results of seismic data, sediment cores and bathymetry collected over several cruises, along with results of well cited publications to provide an overview of what is known and what we still need to understand respect to the deglaciation of these regions. I will discuss the possible meaning of early post-glacial sedimentary facies and mechanisms acting during initial grounding line retreat, including the role of sediment flux to the ice/bed interface, the influence of climate and ocean changes and sea level rise. I will also introduce research ideas included in submitted and in-preparation proposals that will drive my research over the next years.

OCT
31

BEG Friday Seminar Series
9:00 AM

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Jessica Warren

  Start: October 30, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: October 30, 2014 at 5:00 pm

UTIG Seminar Series: Rodrigo Fernandez-Vasquez, UTIG

  Start: October 31, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: October 31, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Sean Gulick, sean@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0483
 URL:Event Link
"Deglaciation of Marine Environments, Lessons and Questions from Patagonia and the Antarctic Peninsula"

Abstract:

Retreat of marine ice bodies from continental shelves and fjords is a complex process where internal ice dynamics is affected by atmospheric, oceanic and geological factors. During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) ice extended to the edge of the continental shelf in the Antarctic Peninsula (AP). The maximum western extent of what constituted the second largest ice body in the southern hemisphere, the Patagonian Ice Sheet (PIS; or Patagonian Ice Cap for some) is still unknown although partial evidence suggest that it might have reached the shelf break in some areas while others might have terminated on land. Geographic proximity, coupling of ocean and atmospheric systems, and some glacial history evidence suggest a certain level of connection between the ice sheets of Patagonia and the AP at least during the last few thousand years before the deglaciation of the continental shelf.

Variable levels of detail exist about the history of deglaciation along the western Antarctic Peninsula. About three decades of marine surveys have resulted on the collection of large amounts of bathymetric and multibeam data, and of hundreds of sediment cores. Today, there is a good understanding of sea floor geomorphological features related to ice retreat dynamics but age control of these features or post glacial sediments is still a methodological challenge. On the other hand, the knowledge of the deglaciation history of the Patagonian continental shelf and fjords is restricted to a handful of fjords with virtually nothing known about the continental shelf.

I will present results of seismic data, sediment cores and bathymetry collected over several cruises, along with results of well cited publications to provide an overview of what is known and what we still need to understand respect to the deglaciation of these regions. I will discuss the possible meaning of early post-glacial sedimentary facies and mechanisms acting during initial grounding line retreat, including the role of sediment flux to the ice/bed interface, the influence of climate and ocean changes and sea level rise. I will also introduce research ideas included in submitted and in-preparation proposals that will drive my research over the next years.

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: October 31, 2014 at 9:00 am     End: October 31, 2014 at 10:00 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
Venkat Lakshmi
Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences
University of South Carolina

Studies of the land surface hydrological cycle using
modeling, observations and remote sensing

Abstract:
Land surface hydrology is comprised of complex processes. Precipitation is partitioned into infiltration and runoff depending on antecedent soil moisture conditions, the properties of the soil and its abilities to conduct water away from the surface, the slope of the land surface and the amount of atmospheric demand for evapotranspiration.The observed solar radiation and the computed downward longwave radiation drive the energy budget and evapotranspiration. However in reality the spatial variability both the land surface properties (soil and vegetation) as well as the meteorological inputs (precipitation and radiation) are not accurately known. This incurs errors in the computer simulations of water and energy budgets. Satellite remote sensing has broad spatial view of the land surface and is able to average the heterogeneities and provide data for use in hydrology such as soil moisture, surface temperature and vegetation density.

In the first part of my talk, I will use an established land surface model (Variable Infiltration Capacity) to study the simulations of the vertical profile of the land surface soil moisture and the surface temperature on a 1/8 degree grid in the Upper Mississippi River Basin over a period of 50 years from 1950-1999 on a daily time step. I have used vegetation densities from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument. The hydrological balance is checked with the observed stream flows at the various gauging stations and the distributed model response of surface temperature is compared to the surface temperature derived from the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS).

In the second part of my talk I will use an innovative change detection algorithm based on active radar observations to downscale soil moisture obtained by a lower resolution passive radiometer. In hydrological studies dealing with catchment hydrology we require high resolution data sets and satellite remote sensing is unable to provide these data sets. Therefore combining information from satellite sensors will help us to achieve our targets. I will use data from the Soil Moisture Experiment 2002 (SMEX02) held in Ames Iowa and SMAPVEX12 held in Manitoba Canada to demonstrate this approach.

NOV
03

Soft Rock Seminar: Jasmine Mason
12:00 PM

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Dr. Jessica Warren

  Start: October 30, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: October 30, 2014 at 5:00 pm

UTIG Seminar Series: Rodrigo Fernandez-Vasquez, UTIG

  Start: October 31, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: October 31, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Sean Gulick, sean@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0483
 URL:Event Link
"Deglaciation of Marine Environments, Lessons and Questions from Patagonia and the Antarctic Peninsula"

Abstract:

Retreat of marine ice bodies from continental shelves and fjords is a complex process where internal ice dynamics is affected by atmospheric, oceanic and geological factors. During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) ice extended to the edge of the continental shelf in the Antarctic Peninsula (AP). The maximum western extent of what constituted the second largest ice body in the southern hemisphere, the Patagonian Ice Sheet (PIS; or Patagonian Ice Cap for some) is still unknown although partial evidence suggest that it might have reached the shelf break in some areas while others might have terminated on land. Geographic proximity, coupling of ocean and atmospheric systems, and some glacial history evidence suggest a certain level of connection between the ice sheets of Patagonia and the AP at least during the last few thousand years before the deglaciation of the continental shelf.

Variable levels of detail exist about the history of deglaciation along the western Antarctic Peninsula. About three decades of marine surveys have resulted on the collection of large amounts of bathymetric and multibeam data, and of hundreds of sediment cores. Today, there is a good understanding of sea floor geomorphological features related to ice retreat dynamics but age control of these features or post glacial sediments is still a methodological challenge. On the other hand, the knowledge of the deglaciation history of the Patagonian continental shelf and fjords is restricted to a handful of fjords with virtually nothing known about the continental shelf.

I will present results of seismic data, sediment cores and bathymetry collected over several cruises, along with results of well cited publications to provide an overview of what is known and what we still need to understand respect to the deglaciation of these regions. I will discuss the possible meaning of early post-glacial sedimentary facies and mechanisms acting during initial grounding line retreat, including the role of sediment flux to the ice/bed interface, the influence of climate and ocean changes and sea level rise. I will also introduce research ideas included in submitted and in-preparation proposals that will drive my research over the next years.

BEG Friday Seminar Series

  Start: October 31, 2014 at 9:00 am     End: October 31, 2014 at 10:00 am
 Location:BEG Main Conference Room; PRC Campus
 Contact:Sophia Ortiz, sophia.ortiz@beg.utexas.edu, 512.475.9588
 URL:Event Link
Venkat Lakshmi
Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences
University of South Carolina

Studies of the land surface hydrological cycle using
modeling, observations and remote sensing

Abstract:
Land surface hydrology is comprised of complex processes. Precipitation is partitioned into infiltration and runoff depending on antecedent soil moisture conditions, the properties of the soil and its abilities to conduct water away from the surface, the slope of the land surface and the amount of atmospheric demand for evapotranspiration.The observed solar radiation and the computed downward longwave radiation drive the energy budget and evapotranspiration. However in reality the spatial variability both the land surface properties (soil and vegetation) as well as the meteorological inputs (precipitation and radiation) are not accurately known. This incurs errors in the computer simulations of water and energy budgets. Satellite remote sensing has broad spatial view of the land surface and is able to average the heterogeneities and provide data for use in hydrology such as soil moisture, surface temperature and vegetation density.

In the first part of my talk, I will use an established land surface model (Variable Infiltration Capacity) to study the simulations of the vertical profile of the land surface soil moisture and the surface temperature on a 1/8 degree grid in the Upper Mississippi River Basin over a period of 50 years from 1950-1999 on a daily time step. I have used vegetation densities from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument. The hydrological balance is checked with the observed stream flows at the various gauging stations and the distributed model response of surface temperature is compared to the surface temperature derived from the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS).

In the second part of my talk I will use an innovative change detection algorithm based on active radar observations to downscale soil moisture obtained by a lower resolution passive radiometer. In hydrological studies dealing with catchment hydrology we require high resolution data sets and satellite remote sensing is unable to provide these data sets. Therefore combining information from satellite sensors will help us to achieve our targets. I will use data from the Soil Moisture Experiment 2002 (SMEX02) held in Ames Iowa and SMAPVEX12 held in Manitoba Canada to demonstrate this approach.

Soft Rock Seminar: Jasmine Mason

  Start: November 3, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: November 3, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Kealie Goodwin, kealiegoodwin@utexas.edu

more →

GeoFORCE Challenge Match - This endowment has launched to ensure the continuation of this critical program
This endowment has launched to ensure the continuation of this critical program
Geoscience Education - Summit on Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education: Summary Report & Survey
Summit on Future of Undergraduate Geoscience Education: Summary Report & Survey
Video: Marine Geology & Geophysics Field Course - UTIG runs one of the world's best
UTIG runs one of the world's best
Find a Career - Whether you're launching a career or hitting the reset button, we can help
Whether you're launching a career or hitting the reset button, we can help
Find a Supervisor - Grad students work with over 70 scientists in 9 research disciplines
Grad students work with over 70 scientists in 9 research disciplines
Alumni - Tailgates, reunions and continuing education with your fellow alums
Tailgates, reunions and continuing education with your fellow alums
 
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