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Video: Fire, Ice & Huge Quantity of Potential Energy - Researchers at the Jackson School of Geosciences are leading a project to learn more about frozen methane under the Gulf of Mexico

Video: Fire, Ice & Huge Quantity of Potential Energy

Researchers at the Jackson School of Geosciences are leading a project to learn more about frozen methane under the Gulf of Mexico

Video: New Stash of Ice Age Fossils

Video: New Stash of Ice Age Fossils

The Miracle of Flight - A graduate student discovers the largest flying animal in history: the Texas Pterosaur

The Miracle of Flight

A graduate student discovers the largest flying animal in history: the Texas Pterosaur

A Classroom at the Edge of the World - Follow students on the Arctic trip of a lifetime

A Classroom at the Edge of the World

Follow students on the Arctic trip of a lifetime

Risk of Amazon Rainforest Dieback is Higher Than IPCC Projects

Risk of Amazon Rainforest Dieback is Higher Than IPCC Projects

  AUSTIN, Texas — A research team led by The University of Texas at Austin has been awarded approximately $58 million to analyze deposits of frozen methane under the Gulf of Mexico that hold enormous potential to increase the world’s energy...

OCT
24

UTIG Seminar Series: Dave Schneider, NCAR
10:30 AM

UTIG Seminar Series: Dave Schneider, NCAR

  Start: October 24, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: October 24, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Yuko Okumura, Yukoo@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0383
 URL:Event Link
“Understanding Antarctic climate change in the context of global warming”

Abstract:

The Antarctic Ice Sheet and circumpolar Southern Ocean play unique roles in the climate system, strongly regulating the distribution of energy. The Antarctic Ice Sheet surface reflects 80% or more of the solar radiation it receives in the summer, and in winter it emits to space much of the heat received from lower latitudes. The Southern Ocean accounts for an estimated 40% of the global oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon, and absorbs excess heat from greenhouse gasses. However, predicting the role and response of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean in global climate change has proven very challenging, due in part to the complex nature of atmosphere-ocean-ice sheet interactions and in part due to sparse observations. For example, there is no agreed-upon explanation for the modest increase in Antarctic sea ice extent since 1979, and differing interpretations on the roles of stratospheric ozone depletion and tropical sea surface temperatures in the strengthening of the westerly winds over the Southern Ocean. Furthermore, our work has shown that sea ice has increased amidst cooling Southern Ocean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and cooling or unchanging coastal East Antarctic air temperatures. These trends are remarkable against the backdrop of global warming, and this talk will interpret the roles of natural variability as well forcing by ozone depletion and tropical SSTs in driving these trends. We will use traditional climate observations as well as ice core proxies to characterize natural variability, and a series of atmospheric model simulations to investigate the causes of recent trends, with a focus on the wind trends.

OCT
27

Soft Rock Seminar: Kim Miller
12:00 PM

UTIG Seminar Series: Dave Schneider, NCAR

  Start: October 24, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: October 24, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Yuko Okumura, Yukoo@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0383
 URL:Event Link
“Understanding Antarctic climate change in the context of global warming”

Abstract:

The Antarctic Ice Sheet and circumpolar Southern Ocean play unique roles in the climate system, strongly regulating the distribution of energy. The Antarctic Ice Sheet surface reflects 80% or more of the solar radiation it receives in the summer, and in winter it emits to space much of the heat received from lower latitudes. The Southern Ocean accounts for an estimated 40% of the global oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon, and absorbs excess heat from greenhouse gasses. However, predicting the role and response of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean in global climate change has proven very challenging, due in part to the complex nature of atmosphere-ocean-ice sheet interactions and in part due to sparse observations. For example, there is no agreed-upon explanation for the modest increase in Antarctic sea ice extent since 1979, and differing interpretations on the roles of stratospheric ozone depletion and tropical sea surface temperatures in the strengthening of the westerly winds over the Southern Ocean. Furthermore, our work has shown that sea ice has increased amidst cooling Southern Ocean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and cooling or unchanging coastal East Antarctic air temperatures. These trends are remarkable against the backdrop of global warming, and this talk will interpret the roles of natural variability as well forcing by ozone depletion and tropical SSTs in driving these trends. We will use traditional climate observations as well as ice core proxies to characterize natural variability, and a series of atmospheric model simulations to investigate the causes of recent trends, with a focus on the wind trends.

Soft Rock Seminar: Kim Miller

  Start: October 27, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: October 27, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Kealie Goodwin, kealiegoodwin@utexas.edu

OCT
28

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Anna Svartman, Kevin Befus
4:00 PM

UTIG Seminar Series: Dave Schneider, NCAR

  Start: October 24, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: October 24, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Yuko Okumura, Yukoo@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0383
 URL:Event Link
“Understanding Antarctic climate change in the context of global warming”

Abstract:

The Antarctic Ice Sheet and circumpolar Southern Ocean play unique roles in the climate system, strongly regulating the distribution of energy. The Antarctic Ice Sheet surface reflects 80% or more of the solar radiation it receives in the summer, and in winter it emits to space much of the heat received from lower latitudes. The Southern Ocean accounts for an estimated 40% of the global oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon, and absorbs excess heat from greenhouse gasses. However, predicting the role and response of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean in global climate change has proven very challenging, due in part to the complex nature of atmosphere-ocean-ice sheet interactions and in part due to sparse observations. For example, there is no agreed-upon explanation for the modest increase in Antarctic sea ice extent since 1979, and differing interpretations on the roles of stratospheric ozone depletion and tropical sea surface temperatures in the strengthening of the westerly winds over the Southern Ocean. Furthermore, our work has shown that sea ice has increased amidst cooling Southern Ocean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and cooling or unchanging coastal East Antarctic air temperatures. These trends are remarkable against the backdrop of global warming, and this talk will interpret the roles of natural variability as well forcing by ozone depletion and tropical SSTs in driving these trends. We will use traditional climate observations as well as ice core proxies to characterize natural variability, and a series of atmospheric model simulations to investigate the causes of recent trends, with a focus on the wind trends.

Soft Rock Seminar: Kim Miller

  Start: October 27, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: October 27, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Kealie Goodwin, kealiegoodwin@utexas.edu

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Anna Svartman, Kevin Befus

  Start: October 28, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: October 28, 2014 at 5:00 pm

OCT
28

Alumni Networking Reception in conjunction with SEG
6:00 PM

UTIG Seminar Series: Dave Schneider, NCAR

  Start: October 24, 2014 at 10:30 am     End: October 24, 2014 at 11:30 am
 Location:PRC, 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg 196, Rm 1.603, Austin, TX 78758
 Contact:Yuko Okumura, Yukoo@ig.utexas.edu, 512-471-0383
 URL:Event Link
“Understanding Antarctic climate change in the context of global warming”

Abstract:

The Antarctic Ice Sheet and circumpolar Southern Ocean play unique roles in the climate system, strongly regulating the distribution of energy. The Antarctic Ice Sheet surface reflects 80% or more of the solar radiation it receives in the summer, and in winter it emits to space much of the heat received from lower latitudes. The Southern Ocean accounts for an estimated 40% of the global oceanic uptake of anthropogenic carbon, and absorbs excess heat from greenhouse gasses. However, predicting the role and response of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean in global climate change has proven very challenging, due in part to the complex nature of atmosphere-ocean-ice sheet interactions and in part due to sparse observations. For example, there is no agreed-upon explanation for the modest increase in Antarctic sea ice extent since 1979, and differing interpretations on the roles of stratospheric ozone depletion and tropical sea surface temperatures in the strengthening of the westerly winds over the Southern Ocean. Furthermore, our work has shown that sea ice has increased amidst cooling Southern Ocean sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and cooling or unchanging coastal East Antarctic air temperatures. These trends are remarkable against the backdrop of global warming, and this talk will interpret the roles of natural variability as well forcing by ozone depletion and tropical SSTs in driving these trends. We will use traditional climate observations as well as ice core proxies to characterize natural variability, and a series of atmospheric model simulations to investigate the causes of recent trends, with a focus on the wind trends.

Soft Rock Seminar: Kim Miller

  Start: October 27, 2014 at 12:00 pm     End: October 27, 2014 at 1:00 pm
 Location:JGB 3.222
 Contact:Kealie Goodwin, kealiegoodwin@utexas.edu

Tech Sessions Speaker Series: Anna Svartman, Kevin Befus

  Start: October 28, 2014 at 4:00 pm     End: October 28, 2014 at 5:00 pm

Alumni Networking Reception in conjunction with SEG

  Start: October 28, 2014 at 6:00 pm     End: October 28, 2014 at 8:00 pm
 Location:Bubba Gump Shrimp Co., Denver CO
 Contact:Kristen Tucek, ktucek@jsg.utexas.edu, 512-775-6745

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Find a Supervisor - Grad students work with over 70 scientists in 9 research disciplines
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